Upload
Login or register

pokemonstheshiz

Last status update:
-
Date Signed Up:4/14/2012
Stats
Content Ranking:#5111
Comment Ranking:#194
Highest Content Rank:#620
Highest Comment Rank:#70
Content Thumbs: 21905 total,  25565 ,  3660
Comment Thumbs: 101086 total,  108718 ,  7632
Content Level Progress: 39.2% (392/1000)
Level 220 Content: Mind Blower → Level 221 Content: Mind Blower
Comment Level Progress: 85% (850/1000)
Level 383 Comments: Arch Mage → Level 384 Comments: Arch Mage
Subscribers:5
Content Views:1138644
Times Content Favorited:1364 times
Total Comments Made:23215
FJ Points:12610
Favorite Tags: is (5) | crashes (4) | my (4) | no (4) | the (4) | You (4) | a (3) | i (3) | lemon (3) | liz (3) | all (2) | Cars (2) | colbert (2) | dead (2) | Dog (2) | here (2) | it (2) | Just (2) | me (2) | movies (2)

latest user's comments

#124 - "Wow, we're selling more of our product lately. Let's lo…  [+] (4 replies) 08/14/2016 on Common sense prevails -1
User avatar
#142 - thefates (08/14/2016) [-]
Why would they lower the price of their product if they're already selling at a higher price? Most companies would consider doing the opposite, or better yet, nothing at all. Take Apple for instance, they have a market of consumers that they know will keep on coming back as long as they don't directly insult them. So they've just been raising prices for the past few years.
User avatar
#150 - pokemonstheshiz (08/14/2016) [-]
To sell more of the product?
Also, I definitely said "or at least retain the same price"
Certain luxury goods retain or raise prices to retain their image of prosperity, this does not apply to all non-essential goods necessarily.
I said luxury goods before, but I meant non-essential. Luxury goods function differently.

The important point is that essential goods likely won't naturally rise by enough to counteract wage increases. It will hurt some small businesses, but there's always a tradeoff
User avatar
#161 - Kanoah (08/14/2016) [-]
I don't think you're understanding the concept of supply and demand, mate, at least not completely. A business isn't going to lower its prices after they start making sales, it's going to begin with the lowest prices they can afford and raise them until they hit the point where people don't want to buy their product any more.If people suddenly start making more money and go out and buy goods, be they basic or luxury, the companies that sell them are going to notice the spike in demand and adjust their prices accordingly. Even luxury goods, which tend to be pretty elastic, aren't going to stay at about the same price. It's called a demand curve.
User avatar
#158 - thefates (08/14/2016) [-]
Well there you go then, the only reason I responded is because you said that stuff about luxury goods. Even still, with nonessentials they would probably just maintain their current price if they're selling. The incentive to lower price in a free economy is only ever a lack of sales.
#109 - >> #13 , If people have more money, the price of luxury …  [+] (6 replies) 08/14/2016 on Common sense prevails -1
User avatar
#110 - xgokaru (08/14/2016) [-]
But if that were true why would it not be lower right now? I don't think that when everyone has more money people think "Hey everyone is suddenly richer, let's lower the cost of our stuff so we make less money."
User avatar
#124 - pokemonstheshiz (08/14/2016) [-]
"Wow, we're selling more of our product lately. Let's lower the prices on some goods to attract more buyers and take advantage of this"
User avatar
#142 - thefates (08/14/2016) [-]
Why would they lower the price of their product if they're already selling at a higher price? Most companies would consider doing the opposite, or better yet, nothing at all. Take Apple for instance, they have a market of consumers that they know will keep on coming back as long as they don't directly insult them. So they've just been raising prices for the past few years.
User avatar
#150 - pokemonstheshiz (08/14/2016) [-]
To sell more of the product?
Also, I definitely said "or at least retain the same price"
Certain luxury goods retain or raise prices to retain their image of prosperity, this does not apply to all non-essential goods necessarily.
I said luxury goods before, but I meant non-essential. Luxury goods function differently.

The important point is that essential goods likely won't naturally rise by enough to counteract wage increases. It will hurt some small businesses, but there's always a tradeoff
User avatar
#161 - Kanoah (08/14/2016) [-]
I don't think you're understanding the concept of supply and demand, mate, at least not completely. A business isn't going to lower its prices after they start making sales, it's going to begin with the lowest prices they can afford and raise them until they hit the point where people don't want to buy their product any more.If people suddenly start making more money and go out and buy goods, be they basic or luxury, the companies that sell them are going to notice the spike in demand and adjust their prices accordingly. Even luxury goods, which tend to be pretty elastic, aren't going to stay at about the same price. It's called a demand curve.
User avatar
#158 - thefates (08/14/2016) [-]
Well there you go then, the only reason I responded is because you said that stuff about luxury goods. Even still, with nonessentials they would probably just maintain their current price if they're selling. The incentive to lower price in a free economy is only ever a lack of sales.
#107 - A large percentage make less than 15 Even skilled fie…  [+] (9 replies) 08/14/2016 on Common sense prevails 0
User avatar
#112 - herrdoktah (08/14/2016) [-]
Which goes right back to the same argument. Raising minimum wage isn't going to stop higher paid workers from being taken advantage of. A worker that should be paid $20 an hour can still be underpaid to $15. It wouldn't solve the problem while causing new ones as previously more skill intensive jobs also receive a wage increase as well, which in the market can be catastrophic since it would happen in an incredibly short amount of time. There are also some jobs that just are not worth $15 an hour no matter how you look at it.

The better way is to, again, combat corporatism, labor outsourcing, and destructive subsidies, as well as runaway inflation and foreign competition that no country with a standard of living as high as the US could ever hope to compete with.
User avatar
#126 - pokemonstheshiz (08/14/2016) [-]
If higher skilled jobs pay the same, there's little reason to not work lower skilled jobs. When there's less potential employees, they'll either have to raise the salary or lower the entry requirements.

Raising minimum wage in itself won't solve a bunch of problems, but it's at least something positive, since no one wants to/can't impose any laws to prevent the other stuff. Increasing fees on companies that manufacture outside the US would increase costs for the lower class just as much as raising minimum wage.
User avatar
#135 - herrdoktah (08/14/2016) [-]
Which is why raising minimum wage should be a lower priority. It SHOULD be increased slowly and at a better time. Accounted for inflation minimum wage should be in the $20-25 range. Raising minimum wage now would do nothing but make the labor outsourcing problem worse and make current minimum wage jobs illegal. Instantaneously doubling it in the state that the market is would simply cause a catastrophic shift in the economy.
User avatar
#138 - pokemonstheshiz (08/14/2016) [-]
Isn't that the plan though? Raising it to 12 over the next 5-6 years is the plan I've heard
User avatar
#139 - herrdoktah (08/14/2016) [-]
The thing that's covered by the mainstream media and that people are advocating for is to simply raise it to $15 in one day. No matter how well the economy is doing that would be disastrous. Raising it to $12 over the next 5-6 years, so long as other measures are taken to reduce the impact of the things that landed us in this situation in the first place, would be both feasible and healthy for the market as a whole. If that's the only thing done by the legislative branch in that time, though, it would just slowly kill the market or cause year after year of a crawl in economic growth.
User avatar
#151 - pokemonstheshiz (08/14/2016) [-]
Well I'm going off the assumption that if it were to be implemented, the details wouldn't be decided by idiots. When I first heard it, the over 5 years thing was a part of the plan, and likely they'll stick with something like that.
User avatar
#153 - herrdoktah (08/14/2016) [-]
Two things, 1. Murphy's Law. And 2. when it comes to Washington assume nobody has any clue in the slightest what they're talking about or cares in the slightest.
User avatar
#154 - pokemonstheshiz (08/14/2016) [-]
True and true.
This thead's gotten quite out of hand, but I don't know what I was expecting.
User avatar
#156 - herrdoktah (08/14/2016) [-]
Care should be taken when talking about stigmatized political movements. The people we see flaunting the "Raise the minimum wage" policy are usually people hunting for votes and people who look and act like they shouldn't even have a job. Naturally, the worse is assumed.
#6 - Picture 08/14/2016 on Anime Gif Dump +15
#93 - >wages naturally go up Yeah, because places paying mini…  [+] (11 replies) 08/14/2016 on Common sense prevails +9
User avatar
#102 - herrdoktah (08/14/2016) [-]
You do realize the majority of Americans don't work minimum wage jobs, right? The economy won't be fixed just by increasing the minimum wage. Promotions, raises, and more valuable forms of labor also exist. People should be more concerned with combating corporatism, labor outsourcing, and subsidies that keep costs high than making a minute number of jobs illegal.

If skilled and high value labor with a low entry ceiling like most manufacturing jobs were more abundant in the United States the problem would be far less present and severe.
User avatar
#107 - pokemonstheshiz (08/14/2016) [-]
fortune.com/2015/04/13/who-makes-15-per-hour/
A large percentage make less than 15
Even skilled fields are taken advantage of, with incredibly high entry barriers for "entry level jobs" in many fields, even college educated ones.

User avatar
#112 - herrdoktah (08/14/2016) [-]
Which goes right back to the same argument. Raising minimum wage isn't going to stop higher paid workers from being taken advantage of. A worker that should be paid $20 an hour can still be underpaid to $15. It wouldn't solve the problem while causing new ones as previously more skill intensive jobs also receive a wage increase as well, which in the market can be catastrophic since it would happen in an incredibly short amount of time. There are also some jobs that just are not worth $15 an hour no matter how you look at it.

The better way is to, again, combat corporatism, labor outsourcing, and destructive subsidies, as well as runaway inflation and foreign competition that no country with a standard of living as high as the US could ever hope to compete with.
User avatar
#126 - pokemonstheshiz (08/14/2016) [-]
If higher skilled jobs pay the same, there's little reason to not work lower skilled jobs. When there's less potential employees, they'll either have to raise the salary or lower the entry requirements.

Raising minimum wage in itself won't solve a bunch of problems, but it's at least something positive, since no one wants to/can't impose any laws to prevent the other stuff. Increasing fees on companies that manufacture outside the US would increase costs for the lower class just as much as raising minimum wage.
User avatar
#135 - herrdoktah (08/14/2016) [-]
Which is why raising minimum wage should be a lower priority. It SHOULD be increased slowly and at a better time. Accounted for inflation minimum wage should be in the $20-25 range. Raising minimum wage now would do nothing but make the labor outsourcing problem worse and make current minimum wage jobs illegal. Instantaneously doubling it in the state that the market is would simply cause a catastrophic shift in the economy.
User avatar
#138 - pokemonstheshiz (08/14/2016) [-]
Isn't that the plan though? Raising it to 12 over the next 5-6 years is the plan I've heard
User avatar
#139 - herrdoktah (08/14/2016) [-]
The thing that's covered by the mainstream media and that people are advocating for is to simply raise it to $15 in one day. No matter how well the economy is doing that would be disastrous. Raising it to $12 over the next 5-6 years, so long as other measures are taken to reduce the impact of the things that landed us in this situation in the first place, would be both feasible and healthy for the market as a whole. If that's the only thing done by the legislative branch in that time, though, it would just slowly kill the market or cause year after year of a crawl in economic growth.
User avatar
#151 - pokemonstheshiz (08/14/2016) [-]
Well I'm going off the assumption that if it were to be implemented, the details wouldn't be decided by idiots. When I first heard it, the over 5 years thing was a part of the plan, and likely they'll stick with something like that.
User avatar
#153 - herrdoktah (08/14/2016) [-]
Two things, 1. Murphy's Law. And 2. when it comes to Washington assume nobody has any clue in the slightest what they're talking about or cares in the slightest.
User avatar
#154 - pokemonstheshiz (08/14/2016) [-]
True and true.
This thead's gotten quite out of hand, but I don't know what I was expecting.
User avatar
#156 - herrdoktah (08/14/2016) [-]
Care should be taken when talking about stigmatized political movements. The people we see flaunting the "Raise the minimum wage" policy are usually people hunting for votes and people who look and act like they shouldn't even have a job. Naturally, the worse is assumed.
#92 - They already have to innovate to thrive. They have no way to …  [+] (1 reply) 08/14/2016 on Common sense prevails 0
User avatar
#103 - herrdoktah (08/14/2016) [-]
Right, and because the existence of a small business alone is already so difficult, doubling labor costs doesn't help them, and can sink them.
#12 - Pepper on macaroni is the **** though  [+] (1 reply) 08/14/2016 on These Monsters Must Be Stopped +3
User avatar
#21 - leonhardt (08/14/2016) [-]
Especially cayenne pepper