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colesy

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Date Signed Up:6/04/2012
Last Login:9/28/2016
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latest user's comments

#49 - Nero didn't have access to nuclear weapons.  [+] (2 replies) 09/20/2016 on Yteyttabum Ecide Peenyo +5
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#128 - absurdgoldfish (09/20/2016) [-]
I might be wrong here, but aren't there a fuckload of checks and different approvals needed to actually launch a nuke? It's not a big red button that the president can just press to fuck up some country.

And call me a optimist, but time and time again during the Cold War when hostilities were at their highest, human beings choose to not fire the nukes, and both candidates might have some crazy opinions, but I believe, and hope neither would use such weapons.

And from a political standpoint, no modern nation would allow us to fire a nuke unless provoked (ergo someone attempting to nuke us). We would have war with the whole world on our hands.

That said... I sometimes wonder if I will live to see a day when nukes are used on actual targets again. Hopefully not, but it's still something I think about. I mean, so far in history they've only been used on two actual targets.
#63 - anon (09/20/2016) [-]
O, I just said almost the exact same thing as you did.
#46 - Beckett keeps it vague to try and destroy the idea of a "…  [+] (2 replies) 09/20/2016 on Well, The Stanley Parable... +1
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#48 - questionableferret (09/20/2016) [-]
Eh, I'll give you that, though it is ironic that the Becket estate is so touchy about people performing Godot in any manner OTHER than the direct stage directions, thus almost giving it some nature of value and grandiosity not wanted by Becket himself.

The Stanley Parable as a concept, whilst it can not be set outside of an office, is still fairly ubiquitous based on the vagueness of it's concept.
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#49 - colesy (09/20/2016) [-]
There's deep set irony in Godot itself as a play; the whole point of them being strict with the stage directions etc is to stop people from trying to force a grand narrative onto the play, however, you can argue that by denying any interpretation of the play, apart from his philosophical beliefs, he is creating a grand narrative himself. That being said, Beckett seems aware of this and uses it as another layer of his weird comedy within the play.

I think vagueness is sort of necessary in order to create a satire that encompasses a whole genre to be fair.
#40 - I reckon it's got quite a lot of similarities to Godot. For a …  [+] (4 replies) 09/18/2016 on Well, The Stanley Parable... +1
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#45 - questionableferret (09/19/2016) [-]
Huh, I'll give you that, though it does lack Godot's lack of specificity. A friend once told me that Godot can be set anywhere and the characters can be anything, with the first two pages being interpretable as dialogue between spurned lovers, the last words of a dying man, etc, etc.

Still, there's only so vague a video game can really be.
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#46 - colesy (09/20/2016) [-]
Beckett keeps it vague to try and destroy the idea of a "grand narrative" there is no exposition or crisis or conclusion like in most plays because he saw it as pointless. The point being you could read into it any way you want but the truth is that Beckett didn't want a story behind the two characters; he didn't want the play to be set anywhere other than on a stage; Godot isn't a symbol for anything. Beckett even said in an interview when someone asked him if Godot was a metaphor for God: "If by Godot I had meant God I would have said God, and not Godot." that i It is all just Beckett mocking entertainment as literally just something to do to fill the time in between your birth and death. Everything in the play revolves around the idea that life is pointless and fleeting. Obviously this has nothing to do with stanley parable, but the way that they both strike out at the status quo with satire, using similar techniques is where i draw my comparisons. That being said, I'd argue that the exposition in the Stanley Parable is very minimal and vague and, if anything, only there to portray the game as a normal game up until the first choice.
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#48 - questionableferret (09/20/2016) [-]
Eh, I'll give you that, though it is ironic that the Becket estate is so touchy about people performing Godot in any manner OTHER than the direct stage directions, thus almost giving it some nature of value and grandiosity not wanted by Becket himself.

The Stanley Parable as a concept, whilst it can not be set outside of an office, is still fairly ubiquitous based on the vagueness of it's concept.
User avatar
#49 - colesy (09/20/2016) [-]
There's deep set irony in Godot itself as a play; the whole point of them being strict with the stage directions etc is to stop people from trying to force a grand narrative onto the play, however, you can argue that by denying any interpretation of the play, apart from his philosophical beliefs, he is creating a grand narrative himself. That being said, Beckett seems aware of this and uses it as another layer of his weird comedy within the play.

I think vagueness is sort of necessary in order to create a satire that encompasses a whole genre to be fair.
#20 - There's so many layers to it's satire as well. On the surface …  [+] (6 replies) 09/17/2016 on Well, The Stanley Parable... +2
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#21 - questionableferret (09/17/2016) [-]
I dunno if it's Godot, but I'd liken it to the Hitchiker's Guide. Where the Guide rips a fat, nasty one over the whole concept of Science Fiction by positing that actually the chances are the future is going to be just as tawdry and bureaucratic and mundane as modernity, if not more-so, the Stanley Parable posits that true choice isn't possible in games narrative, but that isn't a bad thing.
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#40 - colesy (09/18/2016) [-]
I reckon it's got quite a lot of similarities to Godot. For a start its a critical satire of it's own genre but also it has a looping never ending nature, as does Godot. Also like Godot, it constantly undermines the idea of a "grand narrative" by changing and breaking the 4th wall, stopping the playing from becoming too immersed in some sort of start, beginning and end and then, via this, explores the post-modernist ideas of purpose. Both are minimalistic, with two main characters only and each go through the same existential ordeals.

I can see what you mean about hitchiker's guide as well though.
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#45 - questionableferret (09/19/2016) [-]
Huh, I'll give you that, though it does lack Godot's lack of specificity. A friend once told me that Godot can be set anywhere and the characters can be anything, with the first two pages being interpretable as dialogue between spurned lovers, the last words of a dying man, etc, etc.

Still, there's only so vague a video game can really be.
User avatar
#46 - colesy (09/20/2016) [-]
Beckett keeps it vague to try and destroy the idea of a "grand narrative" there is no exposition or crisis or conclusion like in most plays because he saw it as pointless. The point being you could read into it any way you want but the truth is that Beckett didn't want a story behind the two characters; he didn't want the play to be set anywhere other than on a stage; Godot isn't a symbol for anything. Beckett even said in an interview when someone asked him if Godot was a metaphor for God: "If by Godot I had meant God I would have said God, and not Godot." that i It is all just Beckett mocking entertainment as literally just something to do to fill the time in between your birth and death. Everything in the play revolves around the idea that life is pointless and fleeting. Obviously this has nothing to do with stanley parable, but the way that they both strike out at the status quo with satire, using similar techniques is where i draw my comparisons. That being said, I'd argue that the exposition in the Stanley Parable is very minimal and vague and, if anything, only there to portray the game as a normal game up until the first choice.
User avatar
#48 - questionableferret (09/20/2016) [-]
Eh, I'll give you that, though it is ironic that the Becket estate is so touchy about people performing Godot in any manner OTHER than the direct stage directions, thus almost giving it some nature of value and grandiosity not wanted by Becket himself.

The Stanley Parable as a concept, whilst it can not be set outside of an office, is still fairly ubiquitous based on the vagueness of it's concept.
User avatar
#49 - colesy (09/20/2016) [-]
There's deep set irony in Godot itself as a play; the whole point of them being strict with the stage directions etc is to stop people from trying to force a grand narrative onto the play, however, you can argue that by denying any interpretation of the play, apart from his philosophical beliefs, he is creating a grand narrative himself. That being said, Beckett seems aware of this and uses it as another layer of his weird comedy within the play.

I think vagueness is sort of necessary in order to create a satire that encompasses a whole genre to be fair.
#119 - "accidents happen" -ogthegreat's mother  [+] (1 reply) 09/13/2016 on check yourself before you... +6
User avatar
#121 - ogthegreat (09/13/2016) [-]
Someone's mad they got called out.
#117 - [spoiler] What the **** did you just ******* say about me…  [+] (3 replies) 09/13/2016 on check yourself before you... +9
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#118 - ogthegreat (09/13/2016) [-]
Nice spoiler you got there.
#119 - colesy (09/13/2016) [-]
"accidents happen" -ogthegreat's mother
User avatar
#121 - ogthegreat (09/13/2016) [-]
Someone's mad they got called out.