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angrytoilet

Last status update:
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Date Signed Up:9/25/2010
Last Login:9/02/2015
FunnyJunk Career Stats
Content Thumbs: 3284 total,  3836 ,  552
Comment Thumbs: 2050 total,  2332 ,  282
Content Level Progress: 80% (80/100)
Level 132 Content: Respected Member Of Famiry → Level 133 Content: Respected Member Of Famiry
Comment Level Progress: 88% (88/100)
Level 219 Comments: Comedic Genius → Level 220 Comments: Mind Blower
Subscribers:6
Content Views:118950
Times Content Favorited:340 times
Total Comments Made:822
FJ Points:5275
Favorite Tags: awkward (35) | lack (35) | tags (35) | meaningful (34) | of (34) | OC (8) | i (3) | lied (3) | theyre (3) | epiphany (2)

latest user's comments

#122 - Things would be too easy if everything made sense 03/06/2014 on Neckbeards, bow to your... 0
#116 - It sounds like circular logic because it kind of is. Unfortuna…  [+] (2 new replies) 03/05/2014 on Neckbeards, bow to your... 0
User avatar
#121 - jokeface (03/06/2014) [-]
I can understand that premise, but the problem I have with it is that the association is stemming from a minority, not a majority. Take tattoos for example. Most people with tattoos are generally decent human beings. But some of them are criminals. The internet doesn't wage a hate war on tattoos though, because they know that's absurd and ignorant.

I'm not looking to change the status quo. I know that's a lost cause. People are always gonna hate. I just wish their hate made more sense.
User avatar
#122 - angrytoilet (03/06/2014) [-]
Things would be too easy if everything made sense
#114 - You are misunderstanding. What is fashionable is defined by th…  [+] (4 new replies) 03/05/2014 on Neckbeards, bow to your... 0
User avatar
#115 - jokeface (03/05/2014) [-]
Sounds like circular logic to me. Baseball caps are fashionable because nobody makes fun of them, because they are fashionable.

It had to start somewhere. Something about trilbies and fedoras bothers the internet, and I'd like to know what it is. What was it that designated them as being mockable, that started the apparent mass-unpopularity?
User avatar
#116 - angrytoilet (03/05/2014) [-]
It sounds like circular logic because it kind of is. Unfortunately, that's how people work. That's not how a PERSON works. A person makes decisions based on facts. PEOPLE make decisions based on what other people are doing. It is a sort of mob mentality.

Fedoras and trilbies began receiving their latest series of flak when a zealous atheist posted a picture of himself in poor fashion, topped off with a fedora (or trilby, I don't remember). The picture was captioned with something about being euphoric for his intelligence and not being a sheeple and blah blah blah. What's important is that he violated social standards by being far too loud and far too vehement about being an atheist. People didn't like this, and began associating that bad social behavior with what he was wearing. The perfect symbol for this bad social behavior was found - his hat. After a while, a few other bad social behaviors were tacked onto this image - obese/overweight neckbeards, bronies, "The Friendzone", etc. Now, fedoras/trilbies are associated with these things in internet and pop culture. Just as fashion-forward and risky styles can be associated with good social behavior through the use of attractive models, so too can fedoras/trilbies be associated with bad social behavior.

In essence, there is nothing inherently wrong with the fedora or the trilby. But, mainstream fashion deems it unfashionable because many people don't like it. Many people don't like it because it is often associated with bad social behaviors.
User avatar
#121 - jokeface (03/06/2014) [-]
I can understand that premise, but the problem I have with it is that the association is stemming from a minority, not a majority. Take tattoos for example. Most people with tattoos are generally decent human beings. But some of them are criminals. The internet doesn't wage a hate war on tattoos though, because they know that's absurd and ignorant.

I'm not looking to change the status quo. I know that's a lost cause. People are always gonna hate. I just wish their hate made more sense.
User avatar
#122 - angrytoilet (03/06/2014) [-]
Things would be too easy if everything made sense
#112 - Baseball caps are accepted items of mainstream fashion, sweeti…  [+] (6 new replies) 03/05/2014 on Neckbeards, bow to your... 0
User avatar
#113 - jokeface (03/05/2014) [-]
Trilbies have a cult following, which seems to be unimpeded by the internet's mockery of them. They are immune to the approval/disapproval of the vox populi. With that in mind, surely baseball caps are equally immune. So your statement holds very little weight.
User avatar
#114 - angrytoilet (03/05/2014) [-]
You are misunderstanding. What is fashionable is defined by the majority of a population.

If we designate the population to be the internet (now at this point I'm going to redefine "the internet" as most social media websites with connections to internet culture and pop culture, e.g., facebook(barely), FJ, tumblr, reddit, etc), then what the majority of the internet deems acceptable can be termed "fashionable". As the majority of the internet takes part in making fun of fedoras and trilbies, then these items would not be considered "fashionable". The fact that their following can be described as a "cult following" only proves that it is not mainstream and therefore not "fashonable".

The original question above^ was "How come you don't make fun of people who wear baseball caps?". The reason is simple. Baseball caps are ubiquitous in modern culture and fashion. Because of this, nobody makes fun of them.

It's sad that this is how fashion and society work, but if you want to not be made fun of, you must fall within social standards. Unless you're incredibly attractive. This group of people have huge leeway when it comes to fashion, because their own attractiveness can be used to enhance the attractiveness of the clothing. This is why advertisements for clothing companies almost always include an attractive model.
User avatar
#115 - jokeface (03/05/2014) [-]
Sounds like circular logic to me. Baseball caps are fashionable because nobody makes fun of them, because they are fashionable.

It had to start somewhere. Something about trilbies and fedoras bothers the internet, and I'd like to know what it is. What was it that designated them as being mockable, that started the apparent mass-unpopularity?
User avatar
#116 - angrytoilet (03/05/2014) [-]
It sounds like circular logic because it kind of is. Unfortunately, that's how people work. That's not how a PERSON works. A person makes decisions based on facts. PEOPLE make decisions based on what other people are doing. It is a sort of mob mentality.

Fedoras and trilbies began receiving their latest series of flak when a zealous atheist posted a picture of himself in poor fashion, topped off with a fedora (or trilby, I don't remember). The picture was captioned with something about being euphoric for his intelligence and not being a sheeple and blah blah blah. What's important is that he violated social standards by being far too loud and far too vehement about being an atheist. People didn't like this, and began associating that bad social behavior with what he was wearing. The perfect symbol for this bad social behavior was found - his hat. After a while, a few other bad social behaviors were tacked onto this image - obese/overweight neckbeards, bronies, "The Friendzone", etc. Now, fedoras/trilbies are associated with these things in internet and pop culture. Just as fashion-forward and risky styles can be associated with good social behavior through the use of attractive models, so too can fedoras/trilbies be associated with bad social behavior.

In essence, there is nothing inherently wrong with the fedora or the trilby. But, mainstream fashion deems it unfashionable because many people don't like it. Many people don't like it because it is often associated with bad social behaviors.
User avatar
#121 - jokeface (03/06/2014) [-]
I can understand that premise, but the problem I have with it is that the association is stemming from a minority, not a majority. Take tattoos for example. Most people with tattoos are generally decent human beings. But some of them are criminals. The internet doesn't wage a hate war on tattoos though, because they know that's absurd and ignorant.

I'm not looking to change the status quo. I know that's a lost cause. People are always gonna hate. I just wish their hate made more sense.
User avatar
#122 - angrytoilet (03/06/2014) [-]
Things would be too easy if everything made sense
#110 - That works too.  [+] (8 new replies) 03/05/2014 on Neckbeards, bow to your... 0
User avatar
#111 - jokeface (03/05/2014) [-]
How come you don't make fun of people who wear baseball caps?
User avatar
#112 - angrytoilet (03/05/2014) [-]
Baseball caps are accepted items of mainstream fashion, sweetie. The fact that we don't make fun of them means that they are fashionable. Fashion is amorphous and strange, but it is entirely defined by social standards. Obviously, you have a few oddballs, but it is the majority that defines the trend, much like statistical analysis.
User avatar
#113 - jokeface (03/05/2014) [-]
Trilbies have a cult following, which seems to be unimpeded by the internet's mockery of them. They are immune to the approval/disapproval of the vox populi. With that in mind, surely baseball caps are equally immune. So your statement holds very little weight.
User avatar
#114 - angrytoilet (03/05/2014) [-]
You are misunderstanding. What is fashionable is defined by the majority of a population.

If we designate the population to be the internet (now at this point I'm going to redefine "the internet" as most social media websites with connections to internet culture and pop culture, e.g., facebook(barely), FJ, tumblr, reddit, etc), then what the majority of the internet deems acceptable can be termed "fashionable". As the majority of the internet takes part in making fun of fedoras and trilbies, then these items would not be considered "fashionable". The fact that their following can be described as a "cult following" only proves that it is not mainstream and therefore not "fashonable".

The original question above^ was "How come you don't make fun of people who wear baseball caps?". The reason is simple. Baseball caps are ubiquitous in modern culture and fashion. Because of this, nobody makes fun of them.

It's sad that this is how fashion and society work, but if you want to not be made fun of, you must fall within social standards. Unless you're incredibly attractive. This group of people have huge leeway when it comes to fashion, because their own attractiveness can be used to enhance the attractiveness of the clothing. This is why advertisements for clothing companies almost always include an attractive model.
User avatar
#115 - jokeface (03/05/2014) [-]
Sounds like circular logic to me. Baseball caps are fashionable because nobody makes fun of them, because they are fashionable.

It had to start somewhere. Something about trilbies and fedoras bothers the internet, and I'd like to know what it is. What was it that designated them as being mockable, that started the apparent mass-unpopularity?
User avatar
#116 - angrytoilet (03/05/2014) [-]
It sounds like circular logic because it kind of is. Unfortunately, that's how people work. That's not how a PERSON works. A person makes decisions based on facts. PEOPLE make decisions based on what other people are doing. It is a sort of mob mentality.

Fedoras and trilbies began receiving their latest series of flak when a zealous atheist posted a picture of himself in poor fashion, topped off with a fedora (or trilby, I don't remember). The picture was captioned with something about being euphoric for his intelligence and not being a sheeple and blah blah blah. What's important is that he violated social standards by being far too loud and far too vehement about being an atheist. People didn't like this, and began associating that bad social behavior with what he was wearing. The perfect symbol for this bad social behavior was found - his hat. After a while, a few other bad social behaviors were tacked onto this image - obese/overweight neckbeards, bronies, "The Friendzone", etc. Now, fedoras/trilbies are associated with these things in internet and pop culture. Just as fashion-forward and risky styles can be associated with good social behavior through the use of attractive models, so too can fedoras/trilbies be associated with bad social behavior.

In essence, there is nothing inherently wrong with the fedora or the trilby. But, mainstream fashion deems it unfashionable because many people don't like it. Many people don't like it because it is often associated with bad social behaviors.
User avatar
#121 - jokeface (03/06/2014) [-]
I can understand that premise, but the problem I have with it is that the association is stemming from a minority, not a majority. Take tattoos for example. Most people with tattoos are generally decent human beings. But some of them are criminals. The internet doesn't wage a hate war on tattoos though, because they know that's absurd and ignorant.

I'm not looking to change the status quo. I know that's a lost cause. People are always gonna hate. I just wish their hate made more sense.
User avatar
#122 - angrytoilet (03/06/2014) [-]
Things would be too easy if everything made sense
#108 - The people that defend fedoras against trilbies are generally …  [+] (10 new replies) 03/05/2014 on Neckbeards, bow to your... -1
User avatar
#109 - jokeface (03/05/2014) [-]
I thought the people you're making fun of were people who wear either one.
User avatar
#110 - angrytoilet (03/05/2014) [-]
That works too.
User avatar
#111 - jokeface (03/05/2014) [-]
How come you don't make fun of people who wear baseball caps?
User avatar
#112 - angrytoilet (03/05/2014) [-]
Baseball caps are accepted items of mainstream fashion, sweetie. The fact that we don't make fun of them means that they are fashionable. Fashion is amorphous and strange, but it is entirely defined by social standards. Obviously, you have a few oddballs, but it is the majority that defines the trend, much like statistical analysis.
User avatar
#113 - jokeface (03/05/2014) [-]
Trilbies have a cult following, which seems to be unimpeded by the internet's mockery of them. They are immune to the approval/disapproval of the vox populi. With that in mind, surely baseball caps are equally immune. So your statement holds very little weight.
User avatar
#114 - angrytoilet (03/05/2014) [-]
You are misunderstanding. What is fashionable is defined by the majority of a population.

If we designate the population to be the internet (now at this point I'm going to redefine "the internet" as most social media websites with connections to internet culture and pop culture, e.g., facebook(barely), FJ, tumblr, reddit, etc), then what the majority of the internet deems acceptable can be termed "fashionable". As the majority of the internet takes part in making fun of fedoras and trilbies, then these items would not be considered "fashionable". The fact that their following can be described as a "cult following" only proves that it is not mainstream and therefore not "fashonable".

The original question above^ was "How come you don't make fun of people who wear baseball caps?". The reason is simple. Baseball caps are ubiquitous in modern culture and fashion. Because of this, nobody makes fun of them.

It's sad that this is how fashion and society work, but if you want to not be made fun of, you must fall within social standards. Unless you're incredibly attractive. This group of people have huge leeway when it comes to fashion, because their own attractiveness can be used to enhance the attractiveness of the clothing. This is why advertisements for clothing companies almost always include an attractive model.
User avatar
#115 - jokeface (03/05/2014) [-]
Sounds like circular logic to me. Baseball caps are fashionable because nobody makes fun of them, because they are fashionable.

It had to start somewhere. Something about trilbies and fedoras bothers the internet, and I'd like to know what it is. What was it that designated them as being mockable, that started the apparent mass-unpopularity?
User avatar
#116 - angrytoilet (03/05/2014) [-]
It sounds like circular logic because it kind of is. Unfortunately, that's how people work. That's not how a PERSON works. A person makes decisions based on facts. PEOPLE make decisions based on what other people are doing. It is a sort of mob mentality.

Fedoras and trilbies began receiving their latest series of flak when a zealous atheist posted a picture of himself in poor fashion, topped off with a fedora (or trilby, I don't remember). The picture was captioned with something about being euphoric for his intelligence and not being a sheeple and blah blah blah. What's important is that he violated social standards by being far too loud and far too vehement about being an atheist. People didn't like this, and began associating that bad social behavior with what he was wearing. The perfect symbol for this bad social behavior was found - his hat. After a while, a few other bad social behaviors were tacked onto this image - obese/overweight neckbeards, bronies, "The Friendzone", etc. Now, fedoras/trilbies are associated with these things in internet and pop culture. Just as fashion-forward and risky styles can be associated with good social behavior through the use of attractive models, so too can fedoras/trilbies be associated with bad social behavior.

In essence, there is nothing inherently wrong with the fedora or the trilby. But, mainstream fashion deems it unfashionable because many people don't like it. Many people don't like it because it is often associated with bad social behaviors.
User avatar
#121 - jokeface (03/06/2014) [-]
I can understand that premise, but the problem I have with it is that the association is stemming from a minority, not a majority. Take tattoos for example. Most people with tattoos are generally decent human beings. But some of them are criminals. The internet doesn't wage a hate war on tattoos though, because they know that's absurd and ignorant.

I'm not looking to change the status quo. I know that's a lost cause. People are always gonna hate. I just wish their hate made more sense.
User avatar
#122 - angrytoilet (03/06/2014) [-]
Things would be too easy if everything made sense
#107 - It probably worked for those men because they were inherently … 03/05/2014 on Neckbeards, bow to your... 0
#10 - The actor playing the father is the same actor who played Math…  [+] (4 new replies) 02/27/2014 on Oh god! WHY YOU DO DIS?! +81
User avatar
#34 - hawaiianhappysauce (02/28/2014) [-]
Holy shit you are right...
User avatar
#30 - faithrider (02/27/2014) [-]
"mum"
#19 - wimwam (02/27/2014) [-]
Good catch- I didn't even notice
User avatar
#35 - hawaiianhappysauce (02/28/2014) [-]
Guy was the best character in that whole movie.
#27 - Forwards from grandma. 02/27/2014 on I wonder where the vegans are? 0
#119 - He would make a fine homosexual. Let's hope he's a homosexual.  [+] (1 new reply) 02/19/2014 on MOST BETA MAN ALIVE +1
#148 - sanguinesolitude (02/19/2014) [-]
dat gif... fuckin saved.