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UnoSkullmanx

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Date Signed Up:8/08/2010
Last Login:12/22/2014
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#31 - daily reminder that this is a was shopped it may be o…  [+] (3 new replies) 12/19/2014 on For once he doesn't sound... +15
#151 - psykobear (12/19/2014) [-]
"daily reminder"
What is this tumblr shit?
User avatar #51 - moorgar (12/19/2014) [-]
i just take a huge leap here and say: it was supposed to say Romney?
User avatar #182 - itsmewaffle (12/19/2014) [-]
BITCH YOU GUESSED IT
whoop
YOU WAS RITE
#21 - people still think that's real? 12/14/2014 on I can fap to this +7
#11 - #1, #3, the one to the right of #3, the one on the top right, … 11/21/2014 on And? 10 is flat. Your point? 0
#619 -    ▲ ▲  ▲ 11/03/2014 on A Secret revealed 0
#616 - Comment deleted 11/03/2014 on A Secret revealed 0
#36 - I don't see how the kid did anything wrong. The cops broke in…  [+] (9 new replies) 10/23/2014 on bullshit you a nigga +12
User avatar #266 - capricore (10/23/2014) [-]
And on this topic.

We can go and argue about if the cops did not go in,even if the door was open.Because they be trespassing.And someone was being burgled.
Who to blame?
The cops ofc.
User avatar #145 - TheExile (10/23/2014) [-]
3/3

I'm not saying they handled the situation perfectly. They had there faults, there is no denying that. But to say they were 100% in the wrong? Not at all.
They got a call (from someone who actually probably knew the family, a neighbor) and responded.
They saw pictures of a white family, and saw the kid was black. That was possibly racist, yes. However they saw no proof of him living in the house at all, regardless of race.
We can't speak on the gun thing, because there is no proof either way. It's just his word vs. theirs.
As for entering the home, that's up to personal opinion I'd say. You obviously don't want the police in your home at all. However if it were me in this scenario, I'd rather have had the police come in to be sure that somebody wasn't breaking into my home. I'd rather deal with the police reasonably for an hour or two than worry that had someone broken into my house, they'd stand around like jackasses outside and eventually leave or some stupid shit.
Finally, the neighbors. This is the biggest piece of information anyone had. The police could reasonably assume that the neighbors knew the family. They probably lived next door for years, and knew the family. The kid had only lived in the house for a couple days, so the neighbors didn't know anything yet. So when they saw this kid breaking in, even if the police talked to them first when they arrived, they would have told the officers that an all white family just had a black person enter their home when they're not there. It would have literally created the exact same scenario, except possibly a little worse with the police more sure that he was an intruder.
User avatar #141 - TheExile (10/23/2014) [-]
Don't get me wrong, I'm not one of those guys that support police 100% of the time no matter what they do. I just know that in this scenario (which I mentioned in the other post), I personally know how it should have played out. I was out with friends, came back home at 1 in the morning. Our neighbors saw me looking around for the spare key (I had forgotten where my parents put it) and called the cops. By the time they got there I was inside with the door closed. One officer talked to the neighbors while the other knocked on my front door. He explained they had received a report of a break in, asked me to come outside so they could figure out what happened. Sitting out there I explained the situation and called my parents to come home. Then, I took the officers inside to the photos on the wall and showed them I had proof I lived there. They really only had our best interests in mind, and they only waited for my parents to get home because I was obviously buzzed/underage, so they didn't want to leave me alone like that.

I can tell you that had I not cooperated, or that I had antagonized them, they would have cuffed me. I think pepper spraying was drastic. As for the gun thing, that's just standard procedure in some area. I mean, there's no way to tell what happened. It's just his word vs. theirs. If they really were pointing the guns in his face, then they were definitely in the wrong. If they did what they normally do, which is draw weapons but keep them pointed towards suspects lower extremities for ease of access if needed, then they were just following procedure.

So now, like I said before. I think that in this particular scenario, the police were in the right. Yes, they went too far with the pepper spray. Yes, they should have talked to the neighbors first to see what happened (in which case they would have heard he just walked through the door, and they probably would have thought something else was up; like maybe he wasn't breaking in)
User avatar #137 - TheExile (10/23/2014) [-]
Are you forgetting that the neighbors reported a break in? All this information by itself is not reasonable suspicion, I will 100% agree with you on that. However, with the combination of the door being open and neighbors reporting a break in, there's no denying they had reasonable cause for suspicion. Shit, I had this happen to me when I was younger. Any reasonable cop inb4 "most cops are bad" would detain you on the spot (just put handcuffs on for their protection) and have you sit on the front porch/curb and explain what was going on. Unless, of course, you do something stupid like antagonize the police who are just trying to do their job and protect your home.

So tell me this. If your neighbors called in and reported a break in at your house, would you just want the cops to not show up? Would you want them to ignore it? I'm really not understanding what you wanted to happen here. Even if they were to have knocked on the door, wait and see what was going on and talked to the tenant (who would have been the boy), they would have asked the neighbors (which they should have done to begin with.) When the neighbors told them a white family lived there, they would have still most likely detained the kid because he's not white. Once he could produce proof (family photos, a call to mom to come home, anything) it could have been cleared up in no time at all.

Yes, it can be considered wrong of them to assume a white family didn't adopt a black kid. Even though it is more common today than it was before, that doesn't mean it's something you see every day, or even think about. Neighbors opinions and "facts" are weighed in heavily by the police, as they usually know who the family next door is.

TL;DR I think the cops were in the right. They should have talked to the neighbors first, but it would have resulted in nearly the same scenario.
User avatar #81 - fatmanxxxx (10/23/2014) [-]
Ok how would you handle the situation in the shoes of a cop of a report of a break in by the neighbors. You get there the door is opened.
User avatar #205 - fishandkids (10/23/2014) [-]
Well you ask the guy in the house who he is. When he says he lives there, you ask for evidence while maybe escorting him to the evidence. If there is no evidence you contact the owners of the house and ask if they have a black kid.
User avatar #280 - fatmanxxxx (10/23/2014) [-]
That would come after you would secure the suspect. The cops did what every cop would have done the kid was being stubborn and getting mad and made the situation a lot worse.
User avatar #37 - falbwuh (10/23/2014) [-]
Well I don't know what to tell you buddy, you seem to be looking at the issue technically, whereas I am looking at it pragmatically. I don't think we're ever going to agree with each other on the subject because we have fundamentally different opinions on law enforcement.
#62 - bbobwithtwobs (10/23/2014) [-]
he's not your buddy, pal
#23 - I will blame the cops. They had no reason to enter the house b…  [+] (3 new replies) 10/23/2014 on bullshit you a nigga +1
User avatar #79 - fatmanxxxx (10/23/2014) [-]
Ok let me run this through as the cop. Get called for a burglary by neighbors. They report a black man breaking in. Go to house door is opened. Don't know if there is an innocent in there with the suspect. Procced into house come upon the suspect he claims he lives there look around for pictures of family see white couple call bullshit.

If you were the cop tell me what would you have done. Would you have just stayed outside and let a potential criminal rummage in the house and do nothing. Because i'm pretty sure if this was a situation where it was a criminal and not justa case of mistaken idendity by the neighbor, the people who owned the house would fucking sue the shit out of the police department because they just sat outside while criminal rummaged through their shit and trashed the place.
User avatar #93 - haroldsaxon (10/23/2014) [-]
The kid didn't run, or do anything wrong at all. There was no reason to assault him. The American police is taught to shoot first, ask questions later. If they asked him to stay calm, and try to get to the bottom of this, the problem would be solved without an incident.

Things like this happen in my country all the time, without anyone getting hurt. It is not hard to do. Adoption is fairly common anyways.
User avatar #284 - fatmanxxxx (10/23/2014) [-]
The kid resisted attempts multiple times to secure him so cops could get to the bottom of this. In a situation where you have a suspect in a house where there are no pictures of him with him saying he lives there while resisting to be secured the cops did everything they were supposed to do.
#21 - That is 100% ******** . They had no right to enter…  [+] (37 new replies) 10/23/2014 on bullshit you a nigga +432
User avatar #285 - gammajk (10/23/2014) [-]
>cops get called to a house for a murder in progress
>cops arrive
>they hear gunshots
>they see dead bodies through windows, blood everywhere
>guy inside holding a gun and a knife stabbing and shooting people
>WELP LOOKS LIKE WE CAN'T GO IN, WE DON'T HAVE A WARRANT, LET'S GO HOME GUYS

You're a fucking retard
#273 - Corncob (10/23/2014) [-]
False. Totality of the circumstances allow police to enter the home without a warrant because of the exigency of the crime. For instance. Call for a burglary in progress, open door, and subject inside that the caller described. Police can make entry into the home given the totality of the facts that a reasonable person would assume that the house is currently being burglarized.

Under your logic it would be the same as a hostage situation where police see the subject but cant enter without asking permission because it may be his house. lol

Now when I go to a call with an open door i usually yell inside the residence several times and explain who I am and that if someone is inside the location please identify themselfs. But if I see a subject as described by the caller and he is not listening to commands the good faith doctrinaire allows me to enter. Because if a family is inside at risk and we do not make entry an officer would be fired for failure to do their duty of protecting innocents.

-4 years LE experience
#263 - anonymous (10/23/2014) [-]
... How would you describe reasonable suspicion? A reported break in and an open door? Naaah man, we need at least 3 guys in prison garment carrying loot to their car
User avatar #254 - traelos (10/23/2014) [-]
TL;DR: Cops shouldn't be allowed to do their jobs
#247 - theXsjados (10/23/2014) [-]
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exigent_circumstance_in_United_States_law

Exigent circumstances allow police to enter a home if people are in imminent danger, evidence is at risk of being destroyed, or a suspect is at risk of escaping. If someone reported that a random person they never seen before just entered a home and they think it's burglary an officer will arrive on scene, secure the site, and establish suspect point of entry, and search the outside to see if there's movement in the house. Once back up arrives they go in; there is no knocking first, you don't want to alert a potentially dangerous suspect that people are here to take him into custody. They sweep the house shouting "police", giving the suspect ample opportunity to give up but not enough time to escape or prepare for an attack. Once you find the suspect you take him into custody. You don't try to figure out what's going on right then and there; you secure the scene and the suspect.

Yeah it's bullshit because the neighbors called probably cause the dude was black, but white, chinese, indian, it doesn't matter they would have all been approached in this manner by the police if the neighbors called and said "I think I'm witnessing a burglary."
User avatar #244 - fizzor (10/23/2014) [-]
"hurr unpopular opinion durr"
Shut the fuck up
#236 - mebbid (10/23/2014) [-]
So then it would be better if no cop was able to enter a house that somebody reported a burglary on? A report of a burglary is 100% within reasonable suspicion.
User avatar #234 - sinonyx (10/23/2014) [-]
Probable cause
"In the supreme court case Brinegar v. United States, the Supreme Court defines probable cause as “where the facts and circumstances within the officers' knowledge, and of which they have reasonably trustworthy information, are sufficient in themselves to warrant a belief by a man of reasonable caution that a crime is being committed.”

as far as the cops know, the neighbor would have no reason to lie about someone breaking into a house.

now sense they weren't going after one specific person or searching a home for stolen property, they didn't need a warrent


Exigent Circumstances (applies to circumstances where getting a search/arrest warrant would compromise evidence or the safety of someone)
"An emergency situation requiring swift action to prevent imminent danger to life or serious damage to property, or to forestall the imminent escape of a suspect, or destruction of evidence."
they legally didn't have to wait for a warrant in order to enter that house
User avatar #226 - grogovic (10/23/2014) [-]
Unpopular opinion? Hahahaha. You think hating cops that crash in houses without a search warrant is uncommon and an ''unpopular opinion''?
#224 - anonymous (10/23/2014) [-]
**anonymous rolled image**

911 call warrants inspection because there is a testimony for crime occurring.

An open door DOES give reasonable suspicion; a neighbor reports a B&E and the door is wide open; too coincidental? The cop was doing his job by going inside because a 911 call warrants entry, especially since it was described as an emergency.

Of course you're not supposed to do everything they say, but you are under every obligation to do what a cop says when you are detained for questioning. Your rights are suspended and you act as if though you are under arrest.

The cop doesn't need a warrant because he was called by 911. He can do everything within the powers of the call by the report e.g. cannot search for drugs, only search for suspects of B&E in the house.
User avatar #214 - themanoffewwords (10/23/2014) [-]
Says he is prepared for red thumbs

gets 275 thumbs up
User avatar #207 - lelennysensei (10/23/2014) [-]
Disagree...if the cops get called in for a robbery, I wouldn't expect them to say, "Oh door's open, but that's not enough evidence to prove a robbery so everything is cool here." They were just doing their job.
#200 - hopskotch (10/23/2014) [-]
As far as legality issues go, this is very accurate. I'm a paralegal

In fact, you don't even have to give an officer your identification if there's no cause.
#169 - anonymous (10/23/2014) [-]
A door being left open is an "invitation" for police to enter your home, the same is true if its unlocked. Furthermore, if a random person decides to try and open your door to find that it is unlocked and then subsequently enter you home, that person is not breaking and entering.

The police had every right to enter that home, just know that you don't quite understand the legal power that the police, or a random person, has.
#239 - ainise (10/23/2014) [-]
What? No. You're wrong. That's called Trespassing. Walking into someones house is trespassing.

Also, No it's not. The police can only enter private property for one of 4 reasons without a warrant. Consent(You invite them in), Plain view(They see something illegal), Searc incident to arrest(AKA Hot Pursuit), Exigent circumstances(AKA a burglary reported and signs of B&E found at the scene). This obviously falls under #4, Exigent Circumstances. However, an unlocked door does not give police, nor random people on the street, the right to enter your property.
#167 - anonymous (10/23/2014) [-]
The police didn't "break" into your house if you left the door open.
User avatar #160 - becauseoprahsaidso (10/23/2014) [-]
"So apparently there's a possible robbery in progress. Oh wait I don't have a warrant. Let me just go get one and I'll come back. Don't get murdered now ya hear! haha"

There's the law and then there's the more sensible thing that could be done that could save someone's life. When shit is going down you don't have time to ask too many questions and to get all the necessary paperwork. How do you suppose they should've handled the situation as they approached the house?
#154 - CXJokerXD (10/23/2014) [-]
Amen my nigga
#152 - nosensephenom (10/23/2014) [-]
That is the most ridiculous line of logic I have ever heard. "Cops called, told the house was being broken into, see an open door and go home." That's what you want? Are you that dense? You're so stupid I literally refuse to finish your comment. All I can surmise is that there are at least 160 other fucking idiots out there too.
#262 - anonymous (10/23/2014) [-]
Okay so if you leave your door open and somebody doesn't recognize you and calls the cops, would you like to be berated and told you're "not in the right house"? Leaving the door open shouldn't be an invitation for the cops to be complete retards and forget even the simplest forms of identification. They literally could have had one officer watch him while the other got ID and called the parents.

But I guess you're all for a fucking police state where leaving the door ajar means being berated by police officers in your own fucking house without a warrant.
#148 - anonymous (10/23/2014) [-]
Your opinion isn't unpopular, it's just wrong. They got a call saying there was a burglary. Cops don't need a warrant if they feel a life could be in danger, it's as simple as that. They didn't know if the guy lived there or not. You can get all "muh freedoms" and "cops are dicks" but in the end if it was me or you the outcome would be the same.... well actually I'd probably have an easier time because I'd cooperate with the guys who have more of a right to be "on edge" in today's world than anyone else, second to soldiers.

Seriously, how many people say "fuck cops" or "all pigs should die?"

The answer is a lot. In a workforce your number 1 goal is going to protect yourself and others. That is all they were attempting to do.
#144 - ncsutroll (10/23/2014) [-]
enjoy your pepper spray
#140 - anonymous (10/23/2014) [-]
That's the single dumbest thing I've read this morning.
The cops get a report of a break in in progress and the only description they have of the suspect is black male.
They arrive at the address of the reported incident to find a door wide open and a subject fitting the description of the alleged perpetrator. That is reasonable suspicion and they are well within the scope of their duties to enter the residence.
Everything that happened inside the home was a direct result of the behaviors of everyone involved. Perhaps the police were aggressive (they are trained to behave that way) and perhaps the teen was belligerent (it was his house after all) but the real culprits, the real assholes are the neighbors that didn't bother to get to know who lived next to them.
This whole mentality thT the cops need a warrant to do anything is absurd and it's getting people hurt by giving them the confidence to act like assholes to the police. Even when they're wrong you should treat them with respect
User avatar #90 - haroldsaxon (10/23/2014) [-]
If a cop asks you to jump, you answer: "how high?"
If you don't jump high enough, it's reasonable for the cop to shoot you.
#76 - anonymous (10/23/2014) [-]
So what is rasonable suspiscion to you? The cops seeingthe burglar walk out of the house with stolen goods after he may havealready harmed the tenants? Pretend you are a cop, you get a call saying there is a break-in in the neighbors house. You assume this is half-way credible because neighbors tend to know who lives next to them, they normally woulndt be asshats like these guys. You get to the house, normally you would knockon the door and ask if everything was alright, but you see that the door is open, a textbook sign of a B&E. So what do you do? If you arent a retard you go in to investigate.

Now, from that point on I think the cops could have handled the situation better. However, saying they had no cause for suspiscion is bullshit. The situation was suspicous as fuck.
#43 - anonymous (10/23/2014) [-]
I don't really care but i'm just sayin the "kid" looks like he's old enough to be carrying an ID card with his address on it.
you're the burglar
nah i live here
can i have some id
k
dunno if the cops thought i didn't live in my own house i would probably just do whatever they say if i were black. don't want a rodney king part 2.
Worst comes to worse you get arrested and your parents get your out within 2 hours unless traffic is way too fucking bad. Parents show ID with their address on it and you're out in fuckin no time m8
#34 - falbwuh (10/23/2014) [-]
If my neighbor called the cops and said a guy just broke into my house, and they showed up to find the door wide open, I would want them to check inside. Believe it or not, not all cops are evil racist assholes who look for ways to piss on your rights 24/7.

If it was me in my house, they I thought I was the burglar, and put me under arrest, I would be probably be pissed, but it would be sorted out quickly and I would realize they were just doing their job.

I can see now this whole thing is really dependent on whether or not they were in the right for entering the house, I say they were, but hey, I'm not a lawyer. You can disagree with me on that if you want, but I still think the cops didn't have any bad intentions, and the black kid handled it in the worst way possible.

And for the record, the opinion that makes the cops the bad guys is ALWAYS the popular opinion.
#36 - UnoSkullmanx (10/23/2014) [-]
I don't see how the kid did anything wrong. The cops broke into the house illegaly. They were trespassers, intruders. Cops don't automatically have the right to go on private property; they need either a warrant or a good reason to suspect that an illegal activity is taking place. If I find strangers inside my house, whether or not they have a uniform is irrelevant; I'll demand they get out of my house. And yes, you are allowed to use physical force to remove a police officer off your property, just like any other trespasser. if they provide a warrant, then that's a different story.

On that note, again, seeing an open door is NOT reasonable suspicion. This can't be argued, people leave doors open and garage doors open all the time. These obviously poorly trained cops made a huge assumption thinking there was anything fishy about that. Yeah, no shit the door was open, the fuckin' guy lived there.

Basically, I'm completely against the cops on this one. They showed very poor judgment and they clearly don't know what they have the legal authority to do.
User avatar #266 - capricore (10/23/2014) [-]
And on this topic.

We can go and argue about if the cops did not go in,even if the door was open.Because they be trespassing.And someone was being burgled.
Who to blame?
The cops ofc.
User avatar #145 - TheExile (10/23/2014) [-]
3/3

I'm not saying they handled the situation perfectly. They had there faults, there is no denying that. But to say they were 100% in the wrong? Not at all.
They got a call (from someone who actually probably knew the family, a neighbor) and responded.
They saw pictures of a white family, and saw the kid was black. That was possibly racist, yes. However they saw no proof of him living in the house at all, regardless of race.
We can't speak on the gun thing, because there is no proof either way. It's just his word vs. theirs.
As for entering the home, that's up to personal opinion I'd say. You obviously don't want the police in your home at all. However if it were me in this scenario, I'd rather have had the police come in to be sure that somebody wasn't breaking into my home. I'd rather deal with the police reasonably for an hour or two than worry that had someone broken into my house, they'd stand around like jackasses outside and eventually leave or some stupid shit.
Finally, the neighbors. This is the biggest piece of information anyone had. The police could reasonably assume that the neighbors knew the family. They probably lived next door for years, and knew the family. The kid had only lived in the house for a couple days, so the neighbors didn't know anything yet. So when they saw this kid breaking in, even if the police talked to them first when they arrived, they would have told the officers that an all white family just had a black person enter their home when they're not there. It would have literally created the exact same scenario, except possibly a little worse with the police more sure that he was an intruder.
User avatar #141 - TheExile (10/23/2014) [-]
Don't get me wrong, I'm not one of those guys that support police 100% of the time no matter what they do. I just know that in this scenario (which I mentioned in the other post), I personally know how it should have played out. I was out with friends, came back home at 1 in the morning. Our neighbors saw me looking around for the spare key (I had forgotten where my parents put it) and called the cops. By the time they got there I was inside with the door closed. One officer talked to the neighbors while the other knocked on my front door. He explained they had received a report of a break in, asked me to come outside so they could figure out what happened. Sitting out there I explained the situation and called my parents to come home. Then, I took the officers inside to the photos on the wall and showed them I had proof I lived there. They really only had our best interests in mind, and they only waited for my parents to get home because I was obviously buzzed/underage, so they didn't want to leave me alone like that.

I can tell you that had I not cooperated, or that I had antagonized them, they would have cuffed me. I think pepper spraying was drastic. As for the gun thing, that's just standard procedure in some area. I mean, there's no way to tell what happened. It's just his word vs. theirs. If they really were pointing the guns in his face, then they were definitely in the wrong. If they did what they normally do, which is draw weapons but keep them pointed towards suspects lower extremities for ease of access if needed, then they were just following procedure.

So now, like I said before. I think that in this particular scenario, the police were in the right. Yes, they went too far with the pepper spray. Yes, they should have talked to the neighbors first to see what happened (in which case they would have heard he just walked through the door, and they probably would have thought something else was up; like maybe he wasn't breaking in)
User avatar #137 - TheExile (10/23/2014) [-]
Are you forgetting that the neighbors reported a break in? All this information by itself is not reasonable suspicion, I will 100% agree with you on that. However, with the combination of the door being open and neighbors reporting a break in, there's no denying they had reasonable cause for suspicion. Shit, I had this happen to me when I was younger. Any reasonable cop inb4 "most cops are bad" would detain you on the spot (just put handcuffs on for their protection) and have you sit on the front porch/curb and explain what was going on. Unless, of course, you do something stupid like antagonize the police who are just trying to do their job and protect your home.

So tell me this. If your neighbors called in and reported a break in at your house, would you just want the cops to not show up? Would you want them to ignore it? I'm really not understanding what you wanted to happen here. Even if they were to have knocked on the door, wait and see what was going on and talked to the tenant (who would have been the boy), they would have asked the neighbors (which they should have done to begin with.) When the neighbors told them a white family lived there, they would have still most likely detained the kid because he's not white. Once he could produce proof (family photos, a call to mom to come home, anything) it could have been cleared up in no time at all.

Yes, it can be considered wrong of them to assume a white family didn't adopt a black kid. Even though it is more common today than it was before, that doesn't mean it's something you see every day, or even think about. Neighbors opinions and "facts" are weighed in heavily by the police, as they usually know who the family next door is.

TL;DR I think the cops were in the right. They should have talked to the neighbors first, but it would have resulted in nearly the same scenario.
User avatar #81 - fatmanxxxx (10/23/2014) [-]
Ok how would you handle the situation in the shoes of a cop of a report of a break in by the neighbors. You get there the door is opened.
User avatar #205 - fishandkids (10/23/2014) [-]
Well you ask the guy in the house who he is. When he says he lives there, you ask for evidence while maybe escorting him to the evidence. If there is no evidence you contact the owners of the house and ask if they have a black kid.
User avatar #280 - fatmanxxxx (10/23/2014) [-]
That would come after you would secure the suspect. The cops did what every cop would have done the kid was being stubborn and getting mad and made the situation a lot worse.
User avatar #37 - falbwuh (10/23/2014) [-]
Well I don't know what to tell you buddy, you seem to be looking at the issue technically, whereas I am looking at it pragmatically. I don't think we're ever going to agree with each other on the subject because we have fundamentally different opinions on law enforcement.
#62 - bbobwithtwobs (10/23/2014) [-]
he's not your buddy, pal
#23 - They're fantastic pets, and every pug is at least a little dif… 10/22/2014 on grounded 0
#12 - Yeah, pugs aren't very smart, this coming from the owner of 3 …  [+] (4 new replies) 10/22/2014 on grounded +5
User avatar #16 - ciacheczko (10/22/2014) [-]
I intend to get a pug somewhere in the nearing future, they seem friendly and fun. Are they okay to handle?
User avatar #18 - phunkyzilla (10/22/2014) [-]
They're easy and fun. and strangely easy to train mine took about 4 or so months to potty train at half a year old. they also do great around people and chicks love em cause they're cute. They do have a lot of breathing problems and later on in life have a slight problem with their eyes falling out of their head. (they can be pushed back in by a vet I know because my uncle is a vet, they then sew the eye shut for a bit)
User avatar #19 - ciacheczko (10/22/2014) [-]
Shit... I think that eye-popping part may create a serious trauma for my potential children. Thanks for your input, I'll remember this for the future use.
#23 - UnoSkullmanx (10/22/2014) [-]
They're fantastic pets, and every pug is at least a little different from another. All 3 of my pugs had completely different personalities, and I think that's a great quality.

Yes, they're pretty easy to train. They really aren't the sharpest tools in the shed, but when they learn to do something, you can rest assured that they won't forget it for a long time.

A serious note of warning, don't physically stress them out. Their cute noses are actually very shitty for respiration. More pugs die of heat exhaustion than anything else, I'd wager. If you walk it for exersise, either walk it on at least mild days only, or go at an easy pace and stop for breaks.

The eye popping out thing does happen, but it's very rare; I've never seen it, and my alst 2 pugs got to be very old to the point where they were falling apart. That's another thing, they really do fall apart. If it clearly looks like it function in life without immense pain, then you gotta put it down. I regret keeping my previous 2 alive as long as I did, they clearly didn't enjoy life at that age.

As morbid as that got, Pugs are fantastic dogs, but they do require special maintenance, especially as they get older.

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User avatar #2 - GabeAsher (05/08/2013) [-]
Hey, I was just wondering, if you don't play items anymore, could I have yours?
I understand if you say no, just figured I would ask anyways :)
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