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SmilingJackSmyth

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Gender: male
Age: 27
Date Signed Up:11/22/2010
Last Login:7/24/2016
Location:Hungary
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Highest Comment Rank:#3276
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Content Views:69070
Times Content Favorited:170 times
Total Comments Made:976
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latest user's comments

#40 - Same old chingy-ass ****** ****, with something to prove and n… 07/18/2016 on Pokemon GO 0
#38 - I'm still not convinced, as both dictionaries said that it mea… 07/17/2016 on Cliff jumping world record... 0
#36 - Yeah, fair enough point on language changing and adapting. But…  [+] (2 new replies) 07/17/2016 on Cliff jumping world record... +1
User avatar
#37 - MonkeyFinger (07/17/2016) [-]
Even from a scholarly standpoint, lethal only denotes the ability to cause death or major damage. That is why fatal is death and lethal is likely death. Fatal is the extreme word. If someone said more fatal, I would agree with you 100%; however, lethal does not denote a guaranteed death only a high degree that death will probably occur. Thank you for your civil discussion of word meaning. It is always a pleasure to have a rational discussion that does not devolve into name calling.
User avatar
#38 - SmilingJackSmyth (07/17/2016) [-]
I'm still not convinced, as both dictionaries said that it means causing or highly likely to cause death. So we seem to be both right, and both wrong.

And I think this is what happens in the "lethal injection" example. It is lethal, 99% of the time. But the margin for error is so low, it is statistically irrelevant, so you omit one word from the whole sentence so it isn't such a mouthful.

What I mean is: he didn't survive a lethal injection, he survived a SUPPOSEDLY lethal injection, but that sounds stupid, and also writing it down like that would imply the injection isn't really lethal, rather than pointing to how unusual surviving one is.

While both adjectives, I think lethal is descriptive of an attribute, while fatal is descriptive of an outcome, which is why you can argue it is the more extreme word. But if you think about it, you don't describe an attribute as fatal, only lethal.

There are no fatal predators. There are fatal crashes, but that describes the end result, not an attribute. Just like there is lethalty, but no fatalty.

And yes, I'm aware of Mortal Kombat's existence, but fatality isn't a real word.
#34 - Note, that secondary meanings are a result…  [+] (4 new replies) 07/17/2016 on Cliff jumping world record... 0
User avatar
#35 - MonkeyFinger (07/17/2016) [-]
Well if you want to get all technical then it comes from the Latin meaning spiritual death. But I don't see you using it in that sense. Language changes and adapts. Anyone who does not understand the rate of change of a language is no linguist. Lethal, by your own provided definition, does not guarantee death. Thus, you proved yourself wrong by a simple google search. You lectured another human being and disseminated false information. You were wrong in doing that.
User avatar
#36 - SmilingJackSmyth (07/17/2016) [-]
Yeah, fair enough point on language changing and adapting. But the prinary meaning of lethal implis death in both results.

And yes, from here on, we could argue whether the official source, or the actually spoken way to go by, and how in the end, the speakers of a language in the majority determine what is wrong and what is alright to say.

The real reason this thing is starting to bug me is because words and expressions seem to become more interchangeable, less meaningful, less expressive. And since English is a world language, we all lose this ability to express ourselves to each other as it gets dumbed down.
User avatar
#37 - MonkeyFinger (07/17/2016) [-]
Even from a scholarly standpoint, lethal only denotes the ability to cause death or major damage. That is why fatal is death and lethal is likely death. Fatal is the extreme word. If someone said more fatal, I would agree with you 100%; however, lethal does not denote a guaranteed death only a high degree that death will probably occur. Thank you for your civil discussion of word meaning. It is always a pleasure to have a rational discussion that does not devolve into name calling.
User avatar
#38 - SmilingJackSmyth (07/17/2016) [-]
I'm still not convinced, as both dictionaries said that it means causing or highly likely to cause death. So we seem to be both right, and both wrong.

And I think this is what happens in the "lethal injection" example. It is lethal, 99% of the time. But the margin for error is so low, it is statistically irrelevant, so you omit one word from the whole sentence so it isn't such a mouthful.

What I mean is: he didn't survive a lethal injection, he survived a SUPPOSEDLY lethal injection, but that sounds stupid, and also writing it down like that would imply the injection isn't really lethal, rather than pointing to how unusual surviving one is.

While both adjectives, I think lethal is descriptive of an attribute, while fatal is descriptive of an outcome, which is why you can argue it is the more extreme word. But if you think about it, you don't describe an attribute as fatal, only lethal.

There are no fatal predators. There are fatal crashes, but that describes the end result, not an attribute. Just like there is lethalty, but no fatalty.

And yes, I'm aware of Mortal Kombat's existence, but fatality isn't a real word.
#32 - I don't much care how I'm seen as. And no, I don't think anybo…  [+] (6 new replies) 07/17/2016 on Cliff jumping world record... +1
User avatar
#33 - MonkeyFinger (07/17/2016) [-]
Lethal means capable of causing death. You are confusing lethal with fatal which means death occurs. There are numerous examples of people surviving lethal injection or lethal doses. Quick google search reveals this:

Man survives lethal injection.
www.rt.com/usa/335841-ohio-inmate-second-execution/
User avatar
#34 - SmilingJackSmyth (07/17/2016) [-]
www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lethal?utm_campaign=sd&utm_medium=serp&utm_source=jsonld

www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/lethal

Note, that secondary meanings are a result of this "laziness" in common parlance. Just like how I'm calling it laziness, even though it's more complex than that.
User avatar
#35 - MonkeyFinger (07/17/2016) [-]
Well if you want to get all technical then it comes from the Latin meaning spiritual death. But I don't see you using it in that sense. Language changes and adapts. Anyone who does not understand the rate of change of a language is no linguist. Lethal, by your own provided definition, does not guarantee death. Thus, you proved yourself wrong by a simple google search. You lectured another human being and disseminated false information. You were wrong in doing that.
User avatar
#36 - SmilingJackSmyth (07/17/2016) [-]
Yeah, fair enough point on language changing and adapting. But the prinary meaning of lethal implis death in both results.

And yes, from here on, we could argue whether the official source, or the actually spoken way to go by, and how in the end, the speakers of a language in the majority determine what is wrong and what is alright to say.

The real reason this thing is starting to bug me is because words and expressions seem to become more interchangeable, less meaningful, less expressive. And since English is a world language, we all lose this ability to express ourselves to each other as it gets dumbed down.
User avatar
#37 - MonkeyFinger (07/17/2016) [-]
Even from a scholarly standpoint, lethal only denotes the ability to cause death or major damage. That is why fatal is death and lethal is likely death. Fatal is the extreme word. If someone said more fatal, I would agree with you 100%; however, lethal does not denote a guaranteed death only a high degree that death will probably occur. Thank you for your civil discussion of word meaning. It is always a pleasure to have a rational discussion that does not devolve into name calling.
User avatar
#38 - SmilingJackSmyth (07/17/2016) [-]
I'm still not convinced, as both dictionaries said that it means causing or highly likely to cause death. So we seem to be both right, and both wrong.

And I think this is what happens in the "lethal injection" example. It is lethal, 99% of the time. But the margin for error is so low, it is statistically irrelevant, so you omit one word from the whole sentence so it isn't such a mouthful.

What I mean is: he didn't survive a lethal injection, he survived a SUPPOSEDLY lethal injection, but that sounds stupid, and also writing it down like that would imply the injection isn't really lethal, rather than pointing to how unusual surviving one is.

While both adjectives, I think lethal is descriptive of an attribute, while fatal is descriptive of an outcome, which is why you can argue it is the more extreme word. But if you think about it, you don't describe an attribute as fatal, only lethal.

There are no fatal predators. There are fatal crashes, but that describes the end result, not an attribute. Just like there is lethalty, but no fatalty.

And yes, I'm aware of Mortal Kombat's existence, but fatality isn't a real word.
#30 - I wouldn't know, I'm a linguist, not a philologist. My languag… 07/17/2016 on Cliff jumping world record... +1
#28 - I know this really doesn't seem that important, but I would ur…  [+] (2 new replies) 07/17/2016 on Cliff jumping world record... -1
User avatar
#29 - imagnetsux (07/17/2016) [-]
is that why we only have one word for "love" when the ancient greeks had like 3 different ones?
User avatar
#30 - SmilingJackSmyth (07/17/2016) [-]
I wouldn't know, I'm a linguist, not a philologist. My language has two words for love, though.
#26 - Are you a native speaker?  [+] (4 new replies) 07/17/2016 on Cliff jumping world record... -1
User avatar
#27 - Doomonyou (07/17/2016) [-]
I am. But as I said. As long as what I said makes sense that's all that really matters.
User avatar
#28 - SmilingJackSmyth (07/17/2016) [-]
I know this really doesn't seem that important, but I would urge you to choose your words better.

The reason being, that once you start using words that have a close enough meaning, eventually others will copy that laziness, everything will become a synonym, and because of that, words will lose their ability to express.
User avatar
#29 - imagnetsux (07/17/2016) [-]
is that why we only have one word for "love" when the ancient greeks had like 3 different ones?
User avatar
#30 - SmilingJackSmyth (07/17/2016) [-]
I wouldn't know, I'm a linguist, not a philologist. My language has two words for love, though.
#24 - More dangerous. Lethal means it kills you, 100%  [+] (6 new replies) 07/17/2016 on Cliff jumping world record... +1
User avatar
#25 - Doomonyou (07/17/2016) [-]
I guess. Other person understood what I meant so that's all that really matters.
User avatar
#26 - SmilingJackSmyth (07/17/2016) [-]
Are you a native speaker?
User avatar
#27 - Doomonyou (07/17/2016) [-]
I am. But as I said. As long as what I said makes sense that's all that really matters.
User avatar
#28 - SmilingJackSmyth (07/17/2016) [-]
I know this really doesn't seem that important, but I would urge you to choose your words better.

The reason being, that once you start using words that have a close enough meaning, eventually others will copy that laziness, everything will become a synonym, and because of that, words will lose their ability to express.
User avatar
#29 - imagnetsux (07/17/2016) [-]
is that why we only have one word for "love" when the ancient greeks had like 3 different ones?
User avatar
#30 - SmilingJackSmyth (07/17/2016) [-]
I wouldn't know, I'm a linguist, not a philologist. My language has two words for love, though.
#22 - The **** you mean, "more lethal". It's eith…  [+] (16 new replies) 07/17/2016 on Cliff jumping world record... +2
User avatar
#31 - MonkeyFinger (07/17/2016) [-]
Actually, Lethal means deadly or capable of death. The word lethal does not denote that death is guaranteed. There are numerous drug addicts who have survived lethal doses. What he was trying to suggest is that the waterfall broke the surface tension of the water, therefore, reducing risk of fatality. It is the same reason why high divers spray the surface of the water.

The real problem is why you feel the need to correct someone for using a word correctly. It is acceptable to say that something is more lethal. A quick check would have revealed this as true, and you wouldn't come across as so condescending for correcting someone who was right.
User avatar
#32 - SmilingJackSmyth (07/17/2016) [-]
I don't much care how I'm seen as. And no, I don't think anybody survived anything lethal, or it would not have been lethal.

And please tell me how do you think the concept of "more lethal" makes sense. "More easily lethal" sure, but if it kills you, it's lethal, if it doesn't then it was not lethal.

If something is more capable of killing than something else, even then, "more easily lethal" is what makes sense. More lethal implies it kills you deader than something else, which is stupid.
User avatar
#33 - MonkeyFinger (07/17/2016) [-]
Lethal means capable of causing death. You are confusing lethal with fatal which means death occurs. There are numerous examples of people surviving lethal injection or lethal doses. Quick google search reveals this:

Man survives lethal injection.
www.rt.com/usa/335841-ohio-inmate-second-execution/
User avatar
#34 - SmilingJackSmyth (07/17/2016) [-]
www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lethal?utm_campaign=sd&utm_medium=serp&utm_source=jsonld

www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/lethal

Note, that secondary meanings are a result of this "laziness" in common parlance. Just like how I'm calling it laziness, even though it's more complex than that.
User avatar
#35 - MonkeyFinger (07/17/2016) [-]
Well if you want to get all technical then it comes from the Latin meaning spiritual death. But I don't see you using it in that sense. Language changes and adapts. Anyone who does not understand the rate of change of a language is no linguist. Lethal, by your own provided definition, does not guarantee death. Thus, you proved yourself wrong by a simple google search. You lectured another human being and disseminated false information. You were wrong in doing that.
User avatar
#36 - SmilingJackSmyth (07/17/2016) [-]
Yeah, fair enough point on language changing and adapting. But the prinary meaning of lethal implis death in both results.

And yes, from here on, we could argue whether the official source, or the actually spoken way to go by, and how in the end, the speakers of a language in the majority determine what is wrong and what is alright to say.

The real reason this thing is starting to bug me is because words and expressions seem to become more interchangeable, less meaningful, less expressive. And since English is a world language, we all lose this ability to express ourselves to each other as it gets dumbed down.
User avatar
#37 - MonkeyFinger (07/17/2016) [-]
Even from a scholarly standpoint, lethal only denotes the ability to cause death or major damage. That is why fatal is death and lethal is likely death. Fatal is the extreme word. If someone said more fatal, I would agree with you 100%; however, lethal does not denote a guaranteed death only a high degree that death will probably occur. Thank you for your civil discussion of word meaning. It is always a pleasure to have a rational discussion that does not devolve into name calling.
User avatar
#38 - SmilingJackSmyth (07/17/2016) [-]
I'm still not convinced, as both dictionaries said that it means causing or highly likely to cause death. So we seem to be both right, and both wrong.

And I think this is what happens in the "lethal injection" example. It is lethal, 99% of the time. But the margin for error is so low, it is statistically irrelevant, so you omit one word from the whole sentence so it isn't such a mouthful.

What I mean is: he didn't survive a lethal injection, he survived a SUPPOSEDLY lethal injection, but that sounds stupid, and also writing it down like that would imply the injection isn't really lethal, rather than pointing to how unusual surviving one is.

While both adjectives, I think lethal is descriptive of an attribute, while fatal is descriptive of an outcome, which is why you can argue it is the more extreme word. But if you think about it, you don't describe an attribute as fatal, only lethal.

There are no fatal predators. There are fatal crashes, but that describes the end result, not an attribute. Just like there is lethalty, but no fatalty.

And yes, I'm aware of Mortal Kombat's existence, but fatality isn't a real word.
User avatar
#23 - Doomonyou (07/17/2016) [-]
If something has a 20% chance to kill you and another thing has a 30% chance to kill you. Would it not be considered more lethal?
User avatar
#24 - SmilingJackSmyth (07/17/2016) [-]
More dangerous. Lethal means it kills you, 100%
User avatar
#25 - Doomonyou (07/17/2016) [-]
I guess. Other person understood what I meant so that's all that really matters.
User avatar
#26 - SmilingJackSmyth (07/17/2016) [-]
Are you a native speaker?
User avatar
#27 - Doomonyou (07/17/2016) [-]
I am. But as I said. As long as what I said makes sense that's all that really matters.
User avatar
#28 - SmilingJackSmyth (07/17/2016) [-]
I know this really doesn't seem that important, but I would urge you to choose your words better.

The reason being, that once you start using words that have a close enough meaning, eventually others will copy that laziness, everything will become a synonym, and because of that, words will lose their ability to express.
User avatar
#29 - imagnetsux (07/17/2016) [-]
is that why we only have one word for "love" when the ancient greeks had like 3 different ones?
User avatar
#30 - SmilingJackSmyth (07/17/2016) [-]
I wouldn't know, I'm a linguist, not a philologist. My language has two words for love, though.