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SheWolfie

Last status update:
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Gender: female
Age: 20
Date Signed Up:1/29/2010
Last Login:11/30/2016
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Level 176 Content: Soldier Of Funnyjunk → Level 177 Content: Soldier Of Funnyjunk
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Times Content Favorited:110 times
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latest user's comments

#158 - Yes, but what did they do? I read the gouging but was that eve…  [+] (1 reply) 10/22/2016 on /POL/ STOPS ANIMAL ABUSE 0
User avatar
#159 - infinitereaper (10/22/2016) [-]
I'm not looking at it again but it involves, live torture, mutilation, gore, and incites blood-lust and want for vengeance.
#131 - I'm scared to click the link What did they do?  [+] (3 replies) 10/22/2016 on /POL/ STOPS ANIMAL ABUSE 0
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#132 - infinitereaper (10/22/2016) [-]
the pics are censored
and they're still horrible
User avatar
#158 - SheWolfie (10/22/2016) [-]
Yes, but what did they do? I read the gouging but was that everything?
I don't mean that by an "Is that all" i just want to know what these people did but i don't want to see lil pupper
User avatar
#159 - infinitereaper (10/22/2016) [-]
I'm not looking at it again but it involves, live torture, mutilation, gore, and incites blood-lust and want for vengeance.
#40 - Not really starting a company, more of seeing what happens with this.  [+] (3 replies) 09/22/2016 on Finished my first animation 0
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#49 - poruku (09/22/2016) [-]
Keep me informed if you want, I'm also making a game with friends
#42 - sevensixfive (09/22/2016) [-]
Are you making the game with just friends or are you pulling outside people too?
User avatar
#68 - SheWolfie (09/23/2016) [-]
Depends. Mostly right now I'm working on the story with friends while i hone my modeling skills. I could look into outside help as well but I'm not even going into an animation engine without finishing the story.
#37 - lord no. I'm only using it because it pairs well with Unreal  [+] (8 replies) 09/22/2016 on Finished my first animation +3
User avatar
#43 - voidgangsta (09/22/2016) [-]
I have quite a few questions if you don't mind me asking? I'm interested in making video games but just want to get into the art and programming part of it. Is your role just making the 3D models? Blender and Maya are just for making 3D models, right? Is Blender better than Maya for that? How would you use it with Unity? Unity is basically the "programming" part, right? Got any tips on the knowledge and skills I need?
#55 - anon (09/22/2016) [-]
>but just want to get into the art and programming part of it
Game dev is a lot of hard work, and shouldn't be gotten into if you don't want to do hundreds of hours of unpaid and intensive (for the mind) work.
It's like having to eat cake everyday, and if you don't REALLY love cake; you're going to go eat something else (I.e. Do something else).

Moving on from that... Modeling is considered art, and requires one to know how to sculpt, perspective, modeling tricks of the trade, and such art things.
Programming requires logic, hard work, creative thinking, and for one to know their stuff in addition to knowing where to find stuff they don't know to be a proficient programmer.

Anything that deviates from those main roles is essentially an "idea guy," and is useless dead weight. As there's nothing more aggravating than someone saying, "code and art my idea," with skills you took many years to refine, "and you'll get a cut bcs it was my idea!"

>blender/maya
Look at my comment at >>#53
Also, each modeling program is just as good as the other when it comes to capabilities, but it's generally UI/controls that make the difference of opinion for what's "best" per modeler.

>Unity, programming side
Unity is the game engine, so that means a set of tools to design a game. Designing a game includes a majority of programming (programming mechanics, controller for movement, AI, etc), and next is arting (UI done in-engine, modeling/etc done in a modeling program), and last is the rest of the fluff.

My recommendation is to learn one of the skills above, become an asset, and do that one skill extremely well.
Also, please, don't go into game dev if you have the intention of making shovel ware, and just making money. Those devs are lower than scum imo, and this hobby should be gotten into because you love games.

Good luck!
User avatar
#62 - voidgangsta (09/22/2016) [-]
I love games. Loved them all my life. I love the art and detail that go into a game with a good story, like the Last of Us. Games like that really inspire me to be able to make a masterpiece like that. Even games like SOMA. Being able to make a masterpiece on story telling and horror alone, man oh man. I've always loved art, always loved computers, and always loved a good story. What else could I be except a game developer lol. Only problem I have is that I get lazy when I have to search for hard-to-find information in order to continue learning. I like all my learning material right there in front of my face, easily explained. I have no clue how to sculpt and I've never dabbled in programming. So my problems are 1) Getting better at art (and... sculpting?) and 2) Knowing what I actually need to study in programming.
#63 - anon (09/22/2016) [-]
>story centric games
Having a focus on story is an extremely hard thing to pull off with a game, as it's a game, and is meant to be interactive (or else it's technically not a game anymore).
Having a great story is certainly accomplishable and has been done, but one has to never forget they're making a game first and foremost. That means you need the focus on mechanics, gameplay, and such; which could backup a great story.
F.e. bad movie games: The Order... can't really remember others because they're that forgettable.
F.e. good games with great stories: TES: Morrowind, MGS series, Dark souls, blood borne, ev nova, FO:NV, etc.
Each of those has interesting, and well executed stories via different means, but, the main factor here is that they have fun mechanics that inspires the player to advance in the story. Or to even replay the game because both the mechanics are fun, and they want to discover more of the story or unlock more mechanics with an alternate route of decisions.

>Art + programming
Remember though, it's: "do one thing, and do it extremely well." Not: "do a few things mediocrely."
I'd first decide which suits you better, and which you want to spend hundreds, preferably thousands of hours, perfecting, before you start making the game you actually want to make.
As I spend about two years programming, just about everyday and sometimes a few days in a row without sleep, before I got to level where I knew I could make the game I actually wanted to make. During that time I was making mini games, tech demos, learning how to apply my programming to the engine, shaders, graphics pipeline, AI, and such relating to programming (as programming applies to quite a few things when making a game, and makes it all possible).

>I like all my learning material right there in front of my face, easily explained
Once you've decided on which skillset to pursue, then I'd look at some online courses, and learn from experienced teachers (learn the foundations); as this seems like the format you would prefer. You can do online courses from any of the many online course providers... linda, coursera, etc.

After refining your skills, and at least learning the foundations, plus doing some side projects to refine your skills further; I'd look into doing some mini-games to learn how to apply these skills in the engine you'll be using (be it with a partner, i.e. if you do art only you more than likely need a programmer, same doesn't apply the otherway around... although with UE there's blueprints (visual programming, i.e. half assing it) so an artist could get by with a simple to medium complexity game).
Only after you've created stuff, broken it, fixed it, and figured out what does/doesn't work for the myriad of situations you'll get into; I'd start making the game you actually want to make.
Or else what you're doing is crapping out a half baked version of a game you actually did want to play, and would probably have to remake it with all the skills you've learned making it into the half baked product it is (I've seen it happen many times on the various dev forums/boards I visit). So it's best to make mini-games that you don't mind breaking, experimenting with, and refining your skills with before diving into making a game you really want to see made.

Anyways, last piece of advice... dedication always trumps motivation.
Best of luck
User avatar
#64 - jellolicker (09/22/2016) [-]
What's "programming" in this case mean? Being able to use Unity? Like making the 3d model move and stuff?
#66 - anon (09/22/2016) [-]
>What's "programming" in this case mean
Well, there's a huge spectrum of what I mean for programming for unity.
Unity operates on a ECS (entity component system) programming/design paradigm.
Everything you see, I.e. not including outside stuff like external data done in a separate scope, is done using the ECS... And this is all programming (luckily unity has a large variety of templates).
So, for example there's the physics system (ECS), which has things like a rigid body component (ECS), and attaches to an in-game object (ECS).
The physics system manages things like the "ticks" (updating, per physics time step) all of the various components (rigid bodies, other phsics components) that are attached to various entities (characters, enemies, bullet projectiles, etc).
All these parts (except maybe the physics system core logic) can be edited, customized, and extended via programming. Or, using unity provided/custom editor tools to edit the settings that were programmed to be available to the editor, or to program your own components to interact with the physics system.

Now that's just one system, and you can even program your own entire system, with components, to attach to an in-game entity.

It also includes things like shaders (graphics, from fragment, vertex, to other parts of the graphics pipeline... So stuff like SSAO, FXAA, textures, shadows, etc).

Although, a core concept of programming is abstraction, and especially in this case is abstracting away the difficult stuff Into easier to digest pieces. So most tools/components and such are easy to use to make a working game with at least a working knowledge of programming, but the more advanced applications of those tools, extending them, optimizing them, or creating your own systems/components requires a bit higher level of knowledge.

So basically, it covers a lot stuff.
#45 - notyoume (09/22/2016) [-]
I'd like to know all of this too.
User avatar
#65 - voidgangsta (09/22/2016) [-]
>>#55
>>#63
#21 - Blender, I'm brushing up on skills because my friends and I ar…  [+] (19 replies) 09/21/2016 on Finished my first animation +10
User avatar
#35 - voidgangsta (09/22/2016) [-]
Is Blender better than Unity?
#53 - anon (09/22/2016) [-]
Blender has a game engine side, but is a hackey unmaintained mess.
Blender is the free alternative 3D modeling/texturing/UV mapping/animation/etc program, compared to say Maya, to import said modeling related things into a full engine (UE4, Unity, Lumberyard, Godot, etc).
User avatar
#54 - voidgangsta (09/22/2016) [-]
Well, that's half of my questions answered. Thanks based anon.
#57 - anon (09/22/2016) [-]
Happy to help m8, and I hope you try game dev out as it's an extremely fulfilling hobby
User avatar
#37 - SheWolfie (09/22/2016) [-]
lord no.
I'm only using it because it pairs well with Unreal
User avatar
#43 - voidgangsta (09/22/2016) [-]
I have quite a few questions if you don't mind me asking? I'm interested in making video games but just want to get into the art and programming part of it. Is your role just making the 3D models? Blender and Maya are just for making 3D models, right? Is Blender better than Maya for that? How would you use it with Unity? Unity is basically the "programming" part, right? Got any tips on the knowledge and skills I need?
#55 - anon (09/22/2016) [-]
>but just want to get into the art and programming part of it
Game dev is a lot of hard work, and shouldn't be gotten into if you don't want to do hundreds of hours of unpaid and intensive (for the mind) work.
It's like having to eat cake everyday, and if you don't REALLY love cake; you're going to go eat something else (I.e. Do something else).

Moving on from that... Modeling is considered art, and requires one to know how to sculpt, perspective, modeling tricks of the trade, and such art things.
Programming requires logic, hard work, creative thinking, and for one to know their stuff in addition to knowing where to find stuff they don't know to be a proficient programmer.

Anything that deviates from those main roles is essentially an "idea guy," and is useless dead weight. As there's nothing more aggravating than someone saying, "code and art my idea," with skills you took many years to refine, "and you'll get a cut bcs it was my idea!"

>blender/maya
Look at my comment at >>#53
Also, each modeling program is just as good as the other when it comes to capabilities, but it's generally UI/controls that make the difference of opinion for what's "best" per modeler.

>Unity, programming side
Unity is the game engine, so that means a set of tools to design a game. Designing a game includes a majority of programming (programming mechanics, controller for movement, AI, etc), and next is arting (UI done in-engine, modeling/etc done in a modeling program), and last is the rest of the fluff.

My recommendation is to learn one of the skills above, become an asset, and do that one skill extremely well.
Also, please, don't go into game dev if you have the intention of making shovel ware, and just making money. Those devs are lower than scum imo, and this hobby should be gotten into because you love games.

Good luck!
User avatar
#62 - voidgangsta (09/22/2016) [-]
I love games. Loved them all my life. I love the art and detail that go into a game with a good story, like the Last of Us. Games like that really inspire me to be able to make a masterpiece like that. Even games like SOMA. Being able to make a masterpiece on story telling and horror alone, man oh man. I've always loved art, always loved computers, and always loved a good story. What else could I be except a game developer lol. Only problem I have is that I get lazy when I have to search for hard-to-find information in order to continue learning. I like all my learning material right there in front of my face, easily explained. I have no clue how to sculpt and I've never dabbled in programming. So my problems are 1) Getting better at art (and... sculpting?) and 2) Knowing what I actually need to study in programming.
#63 - anon (09/22/2016) [-]
>story centric games
Having a focus on story is an extremely hard thing to pull off with a game, as it's a game, and is meant to be interactive (or else it's technically not a game anymore).
Having a great story is certainly accomplishable and has been done, but one has to never forget they're making a game first and foremost. That means you need the focus on mechanics, gameplay, and such; which could backup a great story.
F.e. bad movie games: The Order... can't really remember others because they're that forgettable.
F.e. good games with great stories: TES: Morrowind, MGS series, Dark souls, blood borne, ev nova, FO:NV, etc.
Each of those has interesting, and well executed stories via different means, but, the main factor here is that they have fun mechanics that inspires the player to advance in the story. Or to even replay the game because both the mechanics are fun, and they want to discover more of the story or unlock more mechanics with an alternate route of decisions.

>Art + programming
Remember though, it's: "do one thing, and do it extremely well." Not: "do a few things mediocrely."
I'd first decide which suits you better, and which you want to spend hundreds, preferably thousands of hours, perfecting, before you start making the game you actually want to make.
As I spend about two years programming, just about everyday and sometimes a few days in a row without sleep, before I got to level where I knew I could make the game I actually wanted to make. During that time I was making mini games, tech demos, learning how to apply my programming to the engine, shaders, graphics pipeline, AI, and such relating to programming (as programming applies to quite a few things when making a game, and makes it all possible).

>I like all my learning material right there in front of my face, easily explained
Once you've decided on which skillset to pursue, then I'd look at some online courses, and learn from experienced teachers (learn the foundations); as this seems like the format you would prefer. You can do online courses from any of the many online course providers... linda, coursera, etc.

After refining your skills, and at least learning the foundations, plus doing some side projects to refine your skills further; I'd look into doing some mini-games to learn how to apply these skills in the engine you'll be using (be it with a partner, i.e. if you do art only you more than likely need a programmer, same doesn't apply the otherway around... although with UE there's blueprints (visual programming, i.e. half assing it) so an artist could get by with a simple to medium complexity game).
Only after you've created stuff, broken it, fixed it, and figured out what does/doesn't work for the myriad of situations you'll get into; I'd start making the game you actually want to make.
Or else what you're doing is crapping out a half baked version of a game you actually did want to play, and would probably have to remake it with all the skills you've learned making it into the half baked product it is (I've seen it happen many times on the various dev forums/boards I visit). So it's best to make mini-games that you don't mind breaking, experimenting with, and refining your skills with before diving into making a game you really want to see made.

Anyways, last piece of advice... dedication always trumps motivation.
Best of luck
User avatar
#64 - jellolicker (09/22/2016) [-]
What's "programming" in this case mean? Being able to use Unity? Like making the 3d model move and stuff?
#66 - anon (09/22/2016) [-]
>What's "programming" in this case mean
Well, there's a huge spectrum of what I mean for programming for unity.
Unity operates on a ECS (entity component system) programming/design paradigm.
Everything you see, I.e. not including outside stuff like external data done in a separate scope, is done using the ECS... And this is all programming (luckily unity has a large variety of templates).
So, for example there's the physics system (ECS), which has things like a rigid body component (ECS), and attaches to an in-game object (ECS).
The physics system manages things like the "ticks" (updating, per physics time step) all of the various components (rigid bodies, other phsics components) that are attached to various entities (characters, enemies, bullet projectiles, etc).
All these parts (except maybe the physics system core logic) can be edited, customized, and extended via programming. Or, using unity provided/custom editor tools to edit the settings that were programmed to be available to the editor, or to program your own components to interact with the physics system.

Now that's just one system, and you can even program your own entire system, with components, to attach to an in-game entity.

It also includes things like shaders (graphics, from fragment, vertex, to other parts of the graphics pipeline... So stuff like SSAO, FXAA, textures, shadows, etc).

Although, a core concept of programming is abstraction, and especially in this case is abstracting away the difficult stuff Into easier to digest pieces. So most tools/components and such are easy to use to make a working game with at least a working knowledge of programming, but the more advanced applications of those tools, extending them, optimizing them, or creating your own systems/components requires a bit higher level of knowledge.

So basically, it covers a lot stuff.
#45 - notyoume (09/22/2016) [-]
I'd like to know all of this too.
User avatar
#65 - voidgangsta (09/22/2016) [-]
>>#55
>>#63
User avatar
#36 - voidgangsta (09/22/2016) [-]
Or Maya? (Not sure what Blender is besides 3D modeling)
User avatar
#28 - poruku (09/22/2016) [-]
Nice mate, you guys starting an indie company?
User avatar
#40 - SheWolfie (09/22/2016) [-]
Not really starting a company, more of seeing what happens with this.
User avatar
#49 - poruku (09/22/2016) [-]
Keep me informed if you want, I'm also making a game with friends
#42 - sevensixfive (09/22/2016) [-]
Are you making the game with just friends or are you pulling outside people too?
User avatar
#68 - SheWolfie (09/23/2016) [-]
Depends. Mostly right now I'm working on the story with friends while i hone my modeling skills. I could look into outside help as well but I'm not even going into an animation engine without finishing the story.
#17 - I didn't notice at first, but now that you've said it I notice…  [+] (1 reply) 09/21/2016 on Finished my first animation +2
User avatar
#41 - Plate (09/22/2016) [-]
Another idea might be to have every letter in "nudes" be carved out at the same time.

Several possibilities. Still, good animation though.