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DiabloStrawhat

Last status update:
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Gender: male
Date Signed Up:10/05/2010
Last Login:7/26/2016
FunnyJunk Career Stats
Comment Ranking:#1985
Highest Content Rank:#4816
Highest Comment Rank:#598
Content Thumbs: 471 total,  567 ,  96
Comment Thumbs: 25892 total,  29362 ,  3470
Content Level Progress: 90% (9/10)
Level 46 Content: Sammich eater → Level 47 Content: Sammich eater
Comment Level Progress: 64.3% (643/1000)
Level 323 Comments: Covered In Thumbs → Level 324 Comments: Covered In Thumbs
Subscribers:0
Content Views:44900
Times Content Favorited:26 times
Total Comments Made:5922
FJ Points:16805

First2[ 7 ]

latest user's comments

#33 - Go back to 2013 5 hours ago on Skyrim Security +1
#41 - This guys' information is faulty as well. The only way circumc… 07/23/2016 on Fresh 4chan comp! 0
#13 - I haven't gone to the gyms even once, I'm too busy catching th… 07/22/2016 on Pokemon go 0
#218 - Geez guy, way to be rude for no real reason. I was just sharin…  [+] (1 new reply) 07/22/2016 on It Will Never Happen 0
#229 - Kkrelk (07/23/2016) [-]
Watching a Charter School go from one of the highest scoring schools in Kansas to one of the worst within about the span of two months of the local School District forcing a hostile takeover and enforcing common core standards is why I hate fucking Common core.
#199 - Teacher speaking: Anyone who complains about the common core s…  [+] (3 new replies) 07/21/2016 on It Will Never Happen -1
#216 - Kkrelk (07/22/2016) [-]
gr8 b8 m8 I r8 8/8. or you're just a particularly stupid teacher. It's not like they're hard to find.
User avatar
#218 - DiabloStrawhat (07/22/2016) [-]
Geez guy, way to be rude for no real reason. I was just sharing my perspective. What do you have against CC that has you so incensed about it?
#229 - Kkrelk (07/23/2016) [-]
Watching a Charter School go from one of the highest scoring schools in Kansas to one of the worst within about the span of two months of the local School District forcing a hostile takeover and enforcing common core standards is why I hate fucking Common core.
#24 - If he doesn't play with that puppy more, I will.  [+] (1 new reply) 07/19/2016 on Quality Time With My Dog 0
#26 - autumnanubis (07/19/2016) [-]
#112 - Glad you think so! I think it provides a way more positive env… 07/18/2016 on chills 0
#110 - Well yeah, if it's not supervised, but you could say that abou…  [+] (2 new replies) 07/18/2016 on chills +1
User avatar
#111 - timmywankenobi (07/18/2016) [-]
hmm I see , well as long as it is supervised properly it would work.
User avatar
#112 - DiabloStrawhat (07/18/2016) [-]
Glad you think so! I think it provides a way more positive environment and encourages good behavior beyond just fear of consequences.
#108 - I'll go ahead and assume you don't actually know what it is. …  [+] (4 new replies) 07/18/2016 on chills 0
User avatar
#109 - timmywankenobi (07/18/2016) [-]
hmm sound like a system that could easily be abused and turned into peer pressure mob justice.
User avatar
#110 - DiabloStrawhat (07/18/2016) [-]
Well yeah, if it's not supervised, but you could say that about anything.

Here, I'll give you an example. At the school I performed my student teaching at, Restorative Justice was often applied in the form of "Restorative Circles." Those affected would form a circle, led by an administrator, and they would all answer questions. Usually we'd start off with some ice breaker questions, don't wanna jump right into things, and only the person whose turn it is to talk may talk. That person would be holding a ball or some other object to indicate that it is their turn. Then, we'd get into the issue, and going around in the circle, each student would answer the following questions, from their own perspective:

1. What happened?
2. What did you think when you realized what had happened?
3. What impact has this incident had on you and others?
4. What has been the hardest thing for you regarding this incident?
5. What do you think needs to happen to make things right?

From what I've seen, this setup encourages all students to be completely honest with themselves and others, even those who caused trouble. And it encourages a hell of a lot more helpful discussion than, "Go to the principals' office."
User avatar
#111 - timmywankenobi (07/18/2016) [-]
hmm I see , well as long as it is supervised properly it would work.
User avatar
#112 - DiabloStrawhat (07/18/2016) [-]
Glad you think so! I think it provides a way more positive environment and encourages good behavior beyond just fear of consequences.
#44 - As a teacher, I resent your opinion but understand where it's …  [+] (7 new replies) 07/18/2016 on chills +4
User avatar
#82 - timmywankenobi (07/18/2016) [-]
" Restorative Justice" - this sounds like Neo-Marxist territory to me .
User avatar
#108 - DiabloStrawhat (07/18/2016) [-]
I'll go ahead and assume you don't actually know what it is.

It's a replacement for the Zero Tolerance discipline policy that exists in most schools. Just punishing bad behavior doesn't work, and in fact can encourage more bad behavior. Instead, Restorative Justice addresses the cause of bad behaviors, has the perpetrator consider the consequences of their actions, and as a group composed of the victim, perpetrator, and their peers, a decision is made of how to best resolve the conflict in a way that benefits everyone.

I've seen it implemented, and it works. Certain schools known for having a difficult student population started using Restorative Justice, and not only did discipline issues greatly decrease, student achievement skyrocketed and graduation rates went up into the 90% category.
User avatar
#109 - timmywankenobi (07/18/2016) [-]
hmm sound like a system that could easily be abused and turned into peer pressure mob justice.
User avatar
#110 - DiabloStrawhat (07/18/2016) [-]
Well yeah, if it's not supervised, but you could say that about anything.

Here, I'll give you an example. At the school I performed my student teaching at, Restorative Justice was often applied in the form of "Restorative Circles." Those affected would form a circle, led by an administrator, and they would all answer questions. Usually we'd start off with some ice breaker questions, don't wanna jump right into things, and only the person whose turn it is to talk may talk. That person would be holding a ball or some other object to indicate that it is their turn. Then, we'd get into the issue, and going around in the circle, each student would answer the following questions, from their own perspective:

1. What happened?
2. What did you think when you realized what had happened?
3. What impact has this incident had on you and others?
4. What has been the hardest thing for you regarding this incident?
5. What do you think needs to happen to make things right?

From what I've seen, this setup encourages all students to be completely honest with themselves and others, even those who caused trouble. And it encourages a hell of a lot more helpful discussion than, "Go to the principals' office."
User avatar
#111 - timmywankenobi (07/18/2016) [-]
hmm I see , well as long as it is supervised properly it would work.
User avatar
#112 - DiabloStrawhat (07/18/2016) [-]
Glad you think so! I think it provides a way more positive environment and encourages good behavior beyond just fear of consequences.
User avatar
#55 - thelastamerican (07/18/2016) [-]
The way I see it, the easiest way to remove the teachers that are non load bearing is to not allow them to be unionized. And I say that as both a current union member, and a future teacher.