The "Kind of Little Things". Animated Boromirs Death: www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZpmZyTK2dI Will be posting more depending on you guys..... The Wizards aren't humans with magic: They are five demi-gods placed in Middle Earth to guard and watch the living races. There are magicians, and sorcerers and facts list interesting LOTR rings lord books
x
Click to expand

The "Kind of Little Things"

The "Kind of Little Things". Animated Boromirs Death: www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZpmZyTK2dI Will be posting more depending on you guys..... The Wizards aren't humans with magic: They are five demi-gods placed in Middle Earth to guard and watch the living races. There are magicians, and sorcerers and

Animated Boromirs Death:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZpmZyTK2dI

Will be posting more depending on you guys...

  • Recommend tagsx
+402
Views: 27958
Favorited: 30
Submitted: 09/14/2013
Share On Facebook
Add to favorites Subscribe to trollypollyz submit to reddit
What do you think? Give us your opinion. Anonymous comments allowed.
User avatar #1 - cupcakecrusader (09/14/2013) [-]
The Wizards aren't humans with magic: They are five demi-gods placed in Middle Earth to guard and watch the living races. There are magicians, and sorcerers and enchanters that are mortal beings however. This is how Gandalf was able to come back to life; his "task" (guarding Middle Earth) was not complete.

The Dwarves were the first race on Middle Earth, but the Elves were the first alive. This is because the god that made the elves too so long making them perfect, that another got bored and made his own, but the elves were meant to be the "first people" so they dwarves weren't given life until later, which is the cause of the great rivalry between the two.

The Orthanc at Isengaurd was a fortress built by men in an age long past (it's older than Helmsdeep iirc), Saruman was given charge of it, as the greatest of the Five, so he could more effectively conduct his research and do his duties.

Minas Tirith (translates as "White Tower") was one of a pair: Minas Morgal ("Black Tower") was its twin. The two were designed to watch the pass to Harador, but Saron took Minas Morgal in the first War of the Ring.

The races of Middle Earth match up, roughly, to the various stereotypical cultures of that era in Europe (from a British perspective):

Hobbits - Irish
Elves - British
Dwarves - Nordic
Men of Ruhn/Harrad - Middle Easterners
Men - mostly Saxon and Teutonic/Germanic (the Gondorians show certain British traits, but this is justified as the Saxons are the main settling group of Britain)

There is almost a decade between when Frodo receives the Ring and when Gandolf finds out what the Ring is, sending him on his journey. Frodo sets out shortly after his fiftieth birthday.
User avatar #24 to #1 - demaciankael (09/14/2013) [-]
Okay, I really don't know where you get a large number of these facts. Honestly, a lot of them are wrong.

Calling the wizards demi-gods are a little off, they are called the Istari.
Minas Tirith translates to "Tower of Guard." The previous name was Minas Anor "Tower of the Sun" and Minas Morgul was Minas Ithil "Tower of the Moon"
The two statues are Isildur and his father, not Isildur and his brother.
#30 to #24 - anon (09/14/2013) [-]
I think it's also important to mention that Istari is the name of the five wizards, and they are of the race Maiar. The Maiar are very much like the Valar, the gods of the world, they are just weaker beings and they tend to serve one of the Valar, like Gandalf served Manwë, Saruman served Aulë and Sauron served Morgoth(Melkor). The Valar aren't supreme beings either, for they were made by Eru Illúvatar, the one supreme god of the LotR universe.

Something like that. I might have gotten some names wrong, if so, sorry about that.
User avatar #33 to #24 - cupcakecrusader (09/14/2013) [-]
Calling them gods and "Istari" is really a matter of semantics. By what measure is a god.
0
#31 to #24 - permass has deleted their comment [-]
User avatar #28 to #1 - huszti (09/14/2013) [-]
Minas Morgul actually translates to "Tower of Black Sorcery" and Minas Tirith is "Tower of Guard"
User avatar #44 to #28 - cupcakecrusader (09/15/2013) [-]
If I recall correctly (it's been a while since I did any research into LotR trivia), those are just colloquial names, given to them by the bards and the like.

They were originally the Black and White cities, as a reference to both their pairing and their stonework. I remember that much...
User avatar #10 to #1 - tkfourtwoone ONLINE (09/14/2013) [-]
Is that Minas Morgal or Minas Morgul?

Also, I'm pretty sure that Dwarves are inspire by Scotts, not Nordic people.
User avatar #14 to #10 - trollypollyz (09/14/2013) [-]
Nords are basically the same thing. Thick accents, heavy drinkers, live in cold weather, headstrong, etc...
User avatar #15 to #14 - cupcakecrusader (09/14/2013) [-]
Very similar, yes. But Nords are much more focused on kinship and bloodlines. The Scotts are more independent dwellers, but they are VERY similar.
User avatar #11 to #10 - cupcakecrusader (09/14/2013) [-]
Woops, typo on the first one

And it's a bit of both. Mostly Nordic, but there are some definite Scottish influences. I didn't really want to mention it, because well: The men of Dale and the like are the real Scotts of Middle Earth.
User avatar #12 to #11 - tkfourtwoone ONLINE (09/14/2013) [-]
It's okay man, thanks for the nice info anyways!
User avatar #13 to #12 - cupcakecrusader (09/14/2013) [-]
Cheers
User avatar #17 to #1 - Awesomenessniss ONLINE (09/14/2013) [-]
Don't forget that Minas Morgul was originally Minas Ithil.
User avatar #18 to #17 - cupcakecrusader (09/14/2013) [-]
I thought there was a name change somewhere in there, but I couldn't remember who got it, when or why. It's been a while since I've read up on my LotR trivia.
User avatar #27 to #18 - huszti (09/14/2013) [-]
i think it was named Minas Ithil while under control of the Men and renamed when the Orcs gained control.
fun fact: when Gondor conquers Minas Morgul in the medieval II: Total war total conversion mod "the third age: total war" it's renamed back to Minas Ithil.
#32 to #1 - covenantbubble (09/14/2013) [-]
Good bit of trivia that be. Thank you
Good bit of trivia that be. Thank you
User avatar #16 to #1 - dafukdude (09/14/2013) [-]
I dislike the fact that Hobbits were inspired by the Irish. We aren't short with hairy feet (well most of us aren't)
User avatar #21 to #16 - nandaaz (09/14/2013) [-]
Stereotype of the Irish: Always happy, drinking and like simple life. Pretty similar to the Hobbits
User avatar #43 to #21 - cupcakecrusader (09/15/2013) [-]
And that's precisely why the ring has such a small effect on Hobbits: The ring amplifies desires.

That's why Boromir demands to use to for the good of Gondor: His loyalty to Gondor and his desire to be a hero is exaggerated to the point where he would sacrifice everything for it.
Gandalf doesn't dare take it up, because he would become an unstoppable force, and an extremist; the cure would become worse than the disease.

However, most hobbits only desire quiet, calm, and peace.
The ring made Bilbo very content despite the adventurousness awakened in the Hobbit. Especially in his latter years.
And when Sam took up the ring to save Frodo, he was able to store a Orcish citadel without so much as a whimper. But once Frodo was saved, his desire to be admired and appreciated took over.
Frodo wants to do the right thing, he wants the Shire to be safe. It takes so long to corrupt him because it has to work on a relatively small desire (his possessiveness) and make it grow.
User avatar #46 to #43 - nandaaz (09/15/2013) [-]
You made me understand the movies a lot better. Thank you, kind sir!
#36 to #16 - theoddanon (09/15/2013) [-]
What's most confusing about this stereotype is that Irish Giants used to be an attraction in British circuses and where known for being quite tall.
User avatar #2 to #1 - trollypollyz (09/14/2013) [-]
I was gonna include that in my other post...
User avatar #3 to #2 - cupcakecrusader (09/14/2013) [-]
Oh you can still make it. There's plenty more out there too.
User avatar #4 to #3 - trollypollyz (09/14/2013) [-]
I already made it, it was supposed to be posted tomorrow. It's fine though..
User avatar #5 to #4 - cupcakecrusader (09/14/2013) [-]
Just post it. I'll even delete my comment if it makes you feel better about it.
#6 to #5 - trollypollyz (09/14/2013) [-]
It's your choice, you gave me some info too!
It's your choice, you gave me some info too!
User avatar #7 to #6 - cupcakecrusader (09/14/2013) [-]
Go, post it! You want me to delete my comment too?
User avatar #8 to #7 - trollypollyz (09/14/2013) [-]
Nope it's fine, posting it tomorrow to get more responses from people...
User avatar #9 to #8 - cupcakecrusader (09/14/2013) [-]
Okay, good luck bud!
#25 - uldification (09/14/2013) [-]
Sure, the second hole is for "hobbits".
User avatar #26 to #25 - cdsams (09/14/2013) [-]
Kinky LOTR!
#20 - bcsaint ONLINE (09/14/2013) [-]
Comment Picture
#22 - swizzll (09/14/2013) [-]
Why don't i remember the 4th one??
Why don't i remember the 4th one??
User avatar #23 to #22 - trollypollyz (09/14/2013) [-]
It was in the trailer for hobbit, but the cut out the actual scene...
User avatar #37 to #23 - vatra (09/15/2013) [-]
It wasn't cut, it was moved to the second movie after they decided to divide it into three movies instead of two like they originally planned.
User avatar #39 to #37 - trollypollyz (09/15/2013) [-]
Ah i see thanks for the info...
User avatar #41 to #39 - vatra (09/15/2013) [-]
No worries, yeah in the second one we will see Gandalf and Radagast investigating Dol Guldur.
#34 - jeezloxxy ONLINE (09/14/2013) [-]
I might be doing a grave mistake giving my opinion on the internet right now, but I always found Boromir's death in the movies to capture his character in the best and most touching way, even better than the books imo. The extended version of the Fellowship of the Ring gave Boromir much needed character development in the face of his past and present thoughts (not to mention the Osgiliath scene in The Two Towers), so I felt much more engaged when he died. His final moments in the movie made him look exactly like the books portrayed him, like a strong and proud warrior of Gondor. I mean for ***** sake, he kept slicing up Uruk-khai even with several arrows up in his chest. In the animated movies he just yelled at them.
At least for me the movies took a step further and gave Boromir a really thought-out character whose struggles were actually believable and to whom we could relate. That's why his death always gets me.
User avatar #35 to #34 - trollypollyz (09/15/2013) [-]
You're safe with us...
#45 - almostninja (09/15/2013) [-]
"The world of men will fall, and all will come to darkness. My city to ruin." - Some of Boromirs last words.   
   
He gave his life for a couple hobbits that he didn't even believe would succeed.
"The world of men will fall, and all will come to darkness. My city to ruin." - Some of Boromirs last words.

He gave his life for a couple hobbits that he didn't even believe would succeed.
User avatar #19 - Lepain (09/14/2013) [-]
LOTR (1978) - Boromir's death
User avatar #29 to #19 - thenewmaroi (09/14/2013) [-]
Watching this with Round and Round by Ratt playing made me think of Heavy Metal
User avatar #38 - kwanzalord (09/15/2013) [-]
The whole Thrain fact was confusing...
User avatar #40 to #38 - trollypollyz (09/15/2013) [-]
I was in a rush sorry. Basically after the loss of the Lonely Mountain he disapeared, everyone thought he was either dead or lost somewhere. But really he was captured by Sauron who was torturing him in Dol Gudur, after Sauron regained his strength he left the fortress. Gandalf went their to find Sauron but only found an old weak Dwarf chained and heavily wounded, the dwarf gave him a key and a map before muttering his last words "Give this to my son". Gandalf took both the items not knowing who his son was until he opened the map and realized it was Thorins father Thrain dead on the floor...
User avatar #42 to #40 - kwanzalord (09/15/2013) [-]
ah okay....that makes sense now.
 Friends (0)