possitivity everywhere. support repost research tinyurl.com/nenkvna . trying to be mare positive ‘sheds electrons and becomes highly unstable‘. Yay, science!
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possitivity everywhere

trying to be mare positive ‘sheds electrons and becomes highly
unstable‘
...
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Views: 46052
Favorited: 35
Submitted: 07/14/2013
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#22 - anonymous (07/15/2013) [-]
So apparently FJ is now tumblr.

they don't even have replies anymore. they're just the status and that's it.
No comedic value whatsoever.
#20 - fallenoffacliff (07/15/2013) [-]
I'm just going to leave this here
#19 - spacelubber (07/15/2013) [-]
But what if he's lithium?
User avatar #11 - popkornking (07/15/2013) [-]
How does shedding electrons make it unstable?
User avatar #12 to #11 - wienersack (07/15/2013) [-]
Let me try to explain it the best I can,but I'll still probably be wrong, so someone can correct me all they want.
You need a certain number of protons, neutrons, and electrons for something to be stable, so too few of any of these will result in instability.
Again, I welcome anyone to correct me.
#21 to #12 - ajweston (07/15/2013) [-]
The element is always named by the number of protons in the nucleus. The charge and generally the re-activity of the particle is usually based on the ratio of protons to electrons (the more negative the charge, the more reactive the particle, usually)

The number of neutrons also affects the stability of the particle, the differing amounts for a set number of protons being called isotopes and the isotopes can be very different, for example, carbon 14 is radioactive whereas the more common isotopes are not.

User avatar #15 to #12 - popkornking (07/15/2013) [-]
As far as I know, instability is only related to the removal of neutrons, removing electrons will only change the overall charge as well as increasing it's electron affinity
User avatar #25 to #15 - dawdawdwa (07/15/2013) [-]
Yes, but not that kind. Here you mean core instability.
The other guy means compound instability.

You`re both correct though, just there`s two kinds of instability.
User avatar #26 to #25 - popkornking (07/15/2013) [-]
I've never heard of compound instability, must be beyond my current knowledge
User avatar #13 to #12 - leonstar (07/15/2013) [-]
The electrons being missing will increase the re-activity of the element, making it bond more easily than it normally would. For example iron spontaneously rusting. You're mostly right about the certain number of protons and neutrons though. I thumbed
User avatar #14 to #13 - wienersack (07/15/2013) [-]
I thank you for the correction.
I thumbed back.
User avatar #7 - supercaptainlarry (07/15/2013) [-]
Trying to loose weight? Go on the neutron diet...
0
#2 - aerius has deleted their comment [-]
#1 - chaosnazo (07/14/2013) [-]
Yay, science!
Yay, science!
#18 to #1 - sightlysuperset (07/15/2013) [-]
here take this
User avatar #9 to #1 - priestoftheoldones (07/15/2013) [-]
Is that two stars crashing together, deflecting, then pulling one another in and creating a new, larger star? Fukken saved.
User avatar #16 to #9 - notstill (07/15/2013) [-]
I don't know what universe you came from to think that those look like stars.
User avatar #17 to #16 - priestoftheoldones (07/15/2013) [-]
Do you know what a newborn star looks like? A mini galaxy.
#10 to #9 - anonymous (07/15/2013) [-]
Galaxies, not stars.
User avatar #3 to #1 - clifford (07/14/2013) [-]
And that is going in my funnyjunk folder! Now all I know is that it looks cool, can you tell me what the hell it is (if something interests me I must find out more about it) ? If you tell me I'll tell you why obsidian is the best material to use when flint knapping.
User avatar #6 to #3 - chaosnazo (07/14/2013) [-]
It's an simulation of two galaxies colliding
User avatar #8 to #6 - clifford (07/15/2013) [-]
Okay did not know that and now it is even more interesting!
The best material for flint knapping is obsidian, when lava contacts a large enough body of water it cools down forming obsidian, it is cooled down so quickly that it gives it a fine crystalline structure, much finer than any other "rock" that you can knap and thus has the ability to be sharper.
User avatar #4 to #3 - killinkyle (07/14/2013) [-]
that is what is going to happen when the milky way collides with Andromeda in a couple million years.
User avatar #5 to #4 - killinkyle (07/14/2013) [-]
billion* whatever
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