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> hey anon, wanna give your opinion?
asd
User avatar #77 - corundum
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/02/2013) [-]
What they don't show you is that real, 100% fruit juice typically has just as much sugar as an equal portion of soda.
User avatar #79 to #77 - colintiernan [OP]
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(02/02/2013) [-]
the difference is that that's natural sugar in juice
User avatar #80 to #79 - corundum
Reply -5 123456789123345869
(02/02/2013) [-]
How in the **** is natural sugar any better than fake sugar? All it does is give you "natural" fat rolls.
#207 to #80 - palmtoyourface
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(02/02/2013) [-]
This image has expired
User avatar #82 to #80 - colintiernan [OP]
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(02/02/2013) [-]
natural sugars burn off faster than added sugar.
#118 to #82 - anon id: 9aa500fd
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(02/02/2013) [-]
No they don't, find me a source where it says that natural sugars is burned off faster.
User avatar #83 to #82 - corundum
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(02/02/2013) [-]
According to whom? I was just counting calories on the side of the bottle and haven't really got into the molecular study of sugar.
User avatar #115 to #83 - srapture
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(02/02/2013) [-]
The natural sugar found in fruit is fructose. Glucose is the sugar added to sugary drinks.
User avatar #116 to #115 - corundum
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(02/02/2013) [-]
Isn't it sucrose? And see comment #94.
#122 to #116 - corundum
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has deleted their comment [-]
User avatar #121 to #116 - srapture
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(02/02/2013) [-]
Sucrose is a combination of fructose and glucose molecules.
User avatar #123 to #121 - corundum
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(02/02/2013) [-]
And?
User avatar #125 to #123 - srapture
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(02/02/2013) [-]
I'm not sure if that is in drinks like Coca Cola, but glucose is definitely the main sugar used.
User avatar #128 to #125 - corundum
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(02/02/2013) [-]
It's mostly high fructose corn syrup.

"..it appears unlikely that [high fructose corn syrup] contributes more to obesity of other conditions than sucrose." --The American Medical Association
www.ama-assn.org/ama1/pub/upload/mm/443/csaph3a08-summary.pdf
User avatar #129 to #128 - srapture
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/02/2013) [-]
...Damn internet. In real life, I can just say things and sound like I'm intelligent because people don't know enough about the subject to dispute it :(
#132 to #129 - corundum
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/02/2013) [-]
1. Go to wikipedia   
2. Find quote that supports your argument   
3. Click on the link that takes you to the actual source of said information   
4. Copy it from there   
   
INSTANT CREDIBILITY
1. Go to wikipedia
2. Find quote that supports your argument
3. Click on the link that takes you to the actual source of said information
4. Copy it from there

INSTANT CREDIBILITY
User avatar #85 to #83 - DoggyBouncer
Reply -2 123456789123345869
(02/02/2013) [-]
It's science you ********. Go back to high school and learn it.
#94 to #85 - corundum
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(02/02/2013) [-]
The differences between the various sugars are taken into account in the calorie tally.

Coca Cola: 100 calories/8 fl oz.
Grape Juice: 260 calories/12 fl oz.

(100 calories/8 fl oz) * (1.5/1.5) = 150 calories/12 fl oz.

260 > 150
User avatar #98 to #94 - DoggyBouncer
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(02/02/2013) [-]
More calories =/= more fat

More calories = more energy

GO BACK TO ******* HIGH SCHOOL **** FOR BRAINS
User avatar #101 to #98 - corundum
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/02/2013) [-]
More energy = more fat. Assuming there isn't some property of "natural" sugars that makes it more difficult to translate their full energy content into fat.
User avatar #108 to #101 - corundum
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(02/02/2013) [-]
Actually, there is a difference when it comes to that. But is it that great of a difference?
User avatar #104 to #101 - DoggyBouncer
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(02/02/2013) [-]
Also you aren't taking calories from fat into account. The soda has at least 70 calories from fat and the juice has none.
#106 to #104 - corundum
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(02/02/2013) [-]
#111 to #106 - DoggyBouncer
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(02/02/2013) [-]
You aren't even taking into account that the soda is processed like ****. It's not a significant source of ANYTHING needed in a daily diet. Fat is needed especially for exercise, not if you're going to sit down and do nothing. The juice has more carbohydrates (needed for exercise) and more calories (needed for exercise). Do you not understand the concept of exercise and healthy eating?
#126 to #111 - anon id: 9aa500fd
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(02/02/2013) [-]
No juice has the exact same type of energy as any soda does, it's C6H12O6 a simple carbohydrate, what makes juice better is usually the vitamins, minerals etc...
When it comes down to it juice is a lot better than soda but don't spout ******** about how they give different energy and carbohydrates needed for working out.
User avatar #127 to #126 - DoggyBouncer
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(02/02/2013) [-]
Yes because I'm going to drink a bottle of soda before I go for a run.
#136 to #127 - anon id: 9aa500fd
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(02/02/2013) [-]
I honestly I am not sure if you're trolling or not but I'll try to explain it to you. If the caloric content of a soda, juice, and pile of sugar are equal, your body will get equal energy out of each one. The energy will not be used differently, the difference comes in what is in addition to the caloric content, sugar would just be basic energy and would probably dehydrate you a bit, the soda will most likely have caffeine a diuretic which is why it's not useful for exercise, on the other hand juice has no diuretic and has additional vitamins and minerals.

Also at what point did I say having soda is a better alternative to juice?
User avatar #112 to #111 - corundum
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(02/02/2013) [-]
Yeah, fruit juices are great for you. It's just that soda is treated like it's ridiculously bad for you when it's just like any other sugary drink in its sugar content.
User avatar #117 to #112 - DoggyBouncer
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(02/02/2013) [-]
You were making it seem that soda is just as good for you, if not better, than fruit juice.
User avatar #102 to #101 - DoggyBouncer
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(02/02/2013) [-]
It means more fat if you sit down and don't do ****, which I assume you're doing right now. You seem like a fat person trying to justify sitting on your fat ass.
#103 to #102 - corundum
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(02/02/2013) [-]
User avatar #105 to #103 - DoggyBouncer
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(02/02/2013) [-]
Congratulations. I'm glad you like your award.
User avatar #97 to #94 - DoggyBouncer
Reply -1 123456789123345869
(02/02/2013) [-]
Calories are a source of energy and heat. There is a reason it has more calories. Because you're supposed to exercise afterwards, and not sit on your fat ass. Seriously, you don't ******* understand anything do you.
User avatar #84 to #83 - colintiernan [OP]
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(02/02/2013) [-]
i took culinary nutrition in high school. apples have natural sugar that is good for you. it has fructose which burns faster then added sugar. so if you drink 100% juices and work out you will be burning calories a lot faster then if you drank a redbull which is Sucrose or table sugar.
#145 to #84 - anon id: 9aa500fd
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(02/02/2013) [-]
If they both have the same caloric content you will not burn off either faster as long as you expend the same amount of energy. Of course you wouldn't drink redbull because of the caffeine and other stuff in it act as a diuretic. Also regardless of what your teachers say do some research of your own, trust me the "facts" they taught you in highschool are not what you want to be basing your arguments off of.

tl;dr you were lied to in highschool
User avatar #99 to #84 - corundum
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(02/02/2013) [-]
An apple is mainly fructose in its sugar composition. Studies comparatively measuring the long term effects between sucrose and fructose in the human body have yet to be conducted.