German language. I guess it explains why when I go to a German pub outside of mother Bavaria and order me some beer in German it comes really fast.. How Germans German language I guess it explains why when go to a pub outside of mother Bavaria and order me some beer in comes really fast How Germans
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German language

 
German language. I guess it explains why when I go to a German pub outside of mother Bavaria and order me some beer in German it comes really fast.. How Germans

I guess it explains why when I go to a German pub outside of mother Bavaria and order me some beer in German it comes really ******* fast.

How Germans see Germans
talking to each other..
Language difference's
g ( Science
tank
Cy runs
It' s just "Panzer".
Nobody in Germany
says "Panzerkampfwagen".
Pauli
n (ily
ily Eula:
fill)
...
+1330
Views: 49103 Submitted: 02/01/2013
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37 comments displayed.
#5 - bchristman
Reply +148
(02/01/2013) [-]
The German word for Pen is Stift... The one you gave was for Ballpoint Pen
#9 to #5 - slackarn
Reply -6
(02/02/2013) [-]
Pen is usually ballpoint with ink, and pencil is the one you sharpen or refill with "stift". So technically he is right?
Pen is usually ballpoint with ink, and pencil is the one you sharpen or refill with "stift". So technically he is right?
#14 to #9 - pornoranger
Reply +8
(02/02/2013) [-]
no he isn't.
any conventional writing tool is referred to as "stift" in german.
#33 to #14 - anon
Reply 0
(02/02/2013) [-]
kugleschreiber litterally translated would be roughly ball-writer (makes sense to me) in danish its kuglepen which means ball-pen.. makes plenty of sense..
#112 to #5 - kampi
Reply 0
(02/02/2013) [-]
And in swedish it's "Kulspetspenna".
#31 to #5 - xncphd
Reply +6
(02/02/2013) [-]
I thought it was kuli.
#28 - mrhaihoang
Reply +116
(02/02/2013) [-]
mfw krankenwagen
#46 to #28 - hotschurl
Reply -4
(02/02/2013) [-]
"Krank" means "Sick/Ill" in English ;)
"Wagen" = "Car", not "Wagon"

"Krake" is the english "Kraken" (or "Tintenfisch" which literally translates to "Ink Fish")
#200 to #46 - aratedchris
Reply -1
(02/02/2013) [-]
dude you obviously didn't get the joke

I'm sick of all the germans trying to correct everyone here by translating it
#47 to #46 - hotschurl
Reply -4
(02/02/2013) [-]
eng. "wagon" is also "Wagon" in German (though prounounced like french, with a silent n, approximately "vug-oh")
#221 to #47 - anon
Reply 0
(02/02/2013) [-]
Genau wegen Leuten wie dir denken viele Menschen auf der Welt wir seien nervige Klugscheißer...
#135 - nastoy
Reply +70
(02/02/2013) [-]
This ******* lame..
Comparing languages with a teutonic origin with languages that are closer related with latin.
Of course they're not gonna sound like eachother...
You could just take some swedish/danish/norwegian words that sounds familiar that sound different in english...
So pointlesss... Ain't really funny...
#362 to #135 - expectation
Reply -1
(02/02/2013) [-]
EXACTLY! Actually one person who realizes why they're so different and doesn't think it's funny.
#333 to #135 - lolzordz
Reply 0
(02/02/2013) [-]
true but even comparing german to languages other than of latin origin, german is still a pretty ******* angry language i have to say
#22 - chuffberry
Reply +59
(02/02/2013) [-]
i am german. here is my german dog. her name is SCHAATZCHE!!! (which means sweetie pie)
inb4 i did not gas her
#207 to #22 - ferrum
Reply +3
(02/02/2013) [-]
Well of course you didn't, dogs can't be jewish.
#68 to #22 - sadaurkar
Reply +9
(02/02/2013) [-]
Wait, you did gas her? I don't think you know how to inb4
#87 to #68 - chuffberry
Reply +8
(02/02/2013) [-]
sorry, i'm still learning how to english.
#314 to #87 - rieskimo
Reply +1
(02/02/2013) [-]
It's OK, we all are.
#3 - thisisrarity
Reply +31
(02/01/2013) [-]
The german version is actually very descriptive and see-through.
The german version is actually very descriptive and see-through.
#318 to #3 - garymotherfinoak
Reply +2
(02/02/2013) [-]
This image has expired
Thus the invention of these pics
#66 - sausageparty
Reply +28
(02/02/2013) [-]
All these words make perfect sense if you know how to speak German.

Kugelschreiber: Kugel means ball, Schreiber means writer.
Gänseblümchen: Gänse means geese, Blümchen means flowers or small flowers
Krankenwagen: Krank means sick, Wagen means wagon or vehicle.
Panzerkampfwagen: Panzer means panzer, Kampf means battle, Wagen means vehicle.
#329 to #66 - iaminfactawizard
Reply +1
(02/02/2013) [-]
BUT WHAT THE **** DOES PANZER MEAN?
#378 to #329 - hairibar
Reply 0
(02/02/2013) [-]
It means panzer
#245 - darknemisis
Reply +24
(02/02/2013) [-]
KRAKENWAGEN!
#249 to #245 - happyyellow **User deleted account**
+4
has deleted their comment [-]
#148 - anaphase
Reply +23
(02/02/2013) [-]
Oop, better call the krankenwagen
Oop, better call the krankenwagen
#8 - farmermcguffen
Reply +21
(02/01/2013) [-]
krankenwagen sounds like a german 80's porno
#71 to #8 - srskate
Reply 0
(02/02/2013) [-]
it literally means sick wagon
#118 - blanc
Reply +12
(02/02/2013) [-]
The german speak really practical.
Gänseblümchen = goose flower, because it is white like a goose and i think those grow on fields where gooses like to be.
Krankenwagen = sick van (or something)
OP forgot to write what we say to science: WISSENSCHAFTEN (wissen means knowledge)
blüternblätter* without "n" = bloom leafes
urteilsvermögen* = judgement ability

you see, we like to put words together to create new words. And i know, you also like it, dickheads.

#122 to #118 - anon
Reply 0
(02/02/2013) [-]
I like German. Please teach me German Mr.Stranger.
#191 to #122 - blanc
Reply +2
(02/02/2013) [-]
what do you want to know, kind stranger?
what do you want to know, kind stranger?
#300 to #191 - anon
Reply 0
(02/02/2013) [-]
How do I order a beer politely?
#372 to #300 - jestersjake
Reply +1
(02/02/2013) [-]
"Ein Bier bitte" oder "Ich hätte gerne ein Bier"

You can remove the "ein" (one) for "zwei, drei,vier" and the sentence is still correct.
#384 to #300 - blanc
Reply 0
(02/02/2013) [-]
and if you get asked wich size you want "Groß" means big and "klein" small. Dont forget to say please = bitte and thank you = danke

also, we germans mix beer with sprite, tastes good - "Radler".
Our best beer is Radeberger, if you can have it.
#354 to #300 - chariot
Reply 0
(02/02/2013) [-]
Bier her, oder ich fall um!
#153 to #118 - anon
Reply 0
(02/02/2013) [-]
That is true untill you get to their grammar which is a 100 times more confusing than English and Spanish for example.