A paradox. i'm not sure which to choose.. It's a multiple choice question with 4 choices, stripping the choices A,B,C, & D of their values to choose one at random gives you a 25% chance of choosing  go hoos
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#133 - SilentRaver
Reply +91
(04/14/2012) [-]
It's a multiple choice question with 4 choices, stripping the choices A,B,C, & D of their values to choose one at random gives you a 25% chance of choosing correctly in any multiple choice question. There are two choices for 25%, you would have a 50% chance of choosing the right answer. So the answer is B.
You can't argue this, B is only one choice of 4, so you still have a 25% chance of choosing it at random. "So wouldn't that make the right answer 25%? That's why it's a paradox?" If the answer were 25%, you would have a 50% chance of choosing it at random. B is still the right answer.
The trick is that the question isn't asking you to actually choose on at random, in order to break out of the circle of fallacies you put yourself into you have to split your imagined situation into two dimensions so that you are a spectator watching another person answer the question at random. What is the chance they will answer correctly? Since it is initially 25% by default for any multiple choice, they have two choices for 25%, you now know that they have a 50% chance of answering correctly, thus YOUR answer is 50% while THEIRS is 25%. Any other speculation beyond this is redundant and will lead you to the same conclusion, answer B and continue with the test.

#367 to #133 - ViXi
Reply 0
(04/14/2012) [-]
I like what you did there
#498 to #133 - gronken
Reply 0
(04/14/2012) [-]
MAKE IT STOP!!!!!
#499 to #133 - gronken
0
has deleted their comment [-]
#520 to #133 - parcorninja
Reply 0
(04/14/2012) [-]
I just woke up 2 minutes ago, And now you made my head hurt
#645 to #133 - Fgner
Reply 0
(04/14/2012) [-]
Actually my good sir, by having two 25% answers, you then can eliminate one of them (assuming both are correct to select). This creates a 1/3 chance of getting it right at random, which is 33.333...% therefore none of these are correct, and it's a 0% chance.
#197 to #133 - lolwutlolwut
Reply +1
(04/14/2012) [-]
If the correct answer is 50%, then the chance of picking 50%(the correct answer in your eyes) is 25%, making it the wrong answer.
#251 to #133 - deltaforceadc
Reply +1
(04/14/2012) [-]
wouldn't "YOUR" answer be 33.3%?
#139 to #133 - tyronebrown
Reply +2
(04/14/2012) [-]
**tyronebrown rolled a random image posted in comment #1 at So true ** Like a sir ^^
#172 to #133 - mrjazzels **User deleted account**
+7
has deleted their comment [-]
#142 to #133 - mylazy
Reply +10
(04/14/2012) [-]
Sorry man. There is a slight problem with that argument. It says that "if you choose a question at random, what is the chance that you will be correct?" This would mean that the correct answer is 25% by default. But since there are two answers of 25% that makes 50% the correct answer right? But if 50% is the correct answer, then there is only one 50%. That makes 25% the correct answer. But there are two 25%'s. That makes 50% the right answer. But there is only one 50%. That means 25% has to be the correct answer. And so on and so on.
#624 to #142 - cjasper
Reply +5
(04/14/2012) [-]
#146 to #142 - SilentRaver
Reply +4
(04/14/2012) [-]
That is what makes splitting the imagined situation into two dimensions, in which you are the spectator of yourself answering this question at random, very crucial.
You have to envision the continued circular paradox until you reach a point where you realize, "Oh **** it actually is possible to stop here!". You have to take logic and try to throw it an entirely different direction than the one life requires it to go for the paradox to finally reach a conclusion.
#151 to #146 - mylazy
Reply +4
(04/14/2012) [-]
Logic cannot be changed. That is why it is logic. You cannot stop at any point and say it is the end because it is a circle. It has no ends. You can say it ends here, but that will never make it true. My conclusion remains the same.
#393 to #151 - adriano **User deleted account**
+4
has deleted their comment [-]
#38 - mrblues
Reply +26
(04/13/2012) [-]
42?
#307 - dogfinder
Reply +21
(04/14/2012) [-]
ITS B
BECAUSE EITHER YOU'RE RIGHT
OR YOU'RE WRONG
50%

#258 - fluffybunnyyellow
Reply +21
(04/14/2012) [-]
<--- Everyone in the comments, discussing this paradox
#391 - ripperrapper
Reply +19
(04/14/2012) [-]
#406 to #391 - OscartheKing
Reply +3
(04/14/2012) [-]
**** YOU WHORE . I hate when teachers do that
#535 - starbuckfrappuccin
Reply +18
(04/14/2012) [-]
MFW
#547 to #535 - supermangoman
Reply +4
(04/14/2012) [-]
Thanks, now there's coke all over the place..
Did you have to be so funny?
#719 to #547 - starbuckfrappuccin
Reply +1
(04/14/2012) [-]
ohstopityou.jpg

#677 to #547 - bellyjeans
Reply +1
(04/14/2012) [-]
Dude... there's coke all over the place?
#652 - lmaobutts
Reply +14
(04/14/2012) [-]
#676 to #652 - dubslao
Reply +1
(04/14/2012) [-]
HOW DID OP KNOW I FAILED MATH?
HOW DID OP KNOW I FAILED MATH?
#103 - magicalex
Reply +13
(04/14/2012) [-]
Four answers

If there is one correct answer, 1/4 = 25%

However, there are two choices for 25%. Therefore, if 25% is right, and there are two options for 25%, 50% is right. Both 25% and 50% cannot be right, so 25% cannot be right.

If the answer is 50%, then there are two possible correct answers, meaning there is another answer besides 50% that is correct. There cannot be two correct answers at the same time that are different, so 60% is left.

60% = 2.4/4. This means 2.4 of the answers are correct, which makes no sense.

Therefore, **** all, there is no correct answer.
#569 - vulpixxx
Reply +11
(04/14/2012) [-]
Okay so actually, it's like this: If we are allowed to make the assumption that the answers A) B) C) D) are the only responses to be picked in a random then the "chance" of picking the right answer is 0% because the correct answer would be 'does not exist' because there is no logical basis to make the assumption that one of the four answers is correct. In reality it's a question hidden behind a misleading question. Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky earned the Nobel prize in 2002 for their models showing that intuitive reasoning is flawed in predictable ways and this is a prime example.
#572 to #569 - demideus
Reply +2
(04/14/2012) [-]
**demideus rolled a random image posted in comment #344 at you want? ** you sounded awesome. Thumb for you
#174 - wisdomtooth
Reply +10
(04/14/2012) [-]
The answer is C

Because **** everything
#207 to #174 - anon
Reply 0
(04/14/2012) [-]
If im not mistaken, i think this is missing the bottom half of the image where the exam is beneath it stating that the test is a true/false test
#185 to #174 - anthonyh
Reply +3
(04/14/2012) [-]
18. C
19. C
20. A
No, wait..
C, yeah we'll go with C again.