Speed of light. but which direction is the light coming from? Like alternate art? Want to check some out? Come on over here!!==>alternateartlives.blogspot.co
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Speed of light

but which direction is the light coming from?
Like alternate art? Want to check some out?
Come on over here!!==>alternateartlives.blogspot.com/

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Views: 48009
Favorited: 108
Submitted: 06/09/2013
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Comments(183):

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What do you think? Give us your opinion. Anonymous comments allowed.
#9 - blizzeh (06/09/2013) [+] (16 replies)
One trillion frames is a lot of frames. Imagine doing gif edits in that
#70 - pwnagraphy (06/09/2013) [+] (5 replies)
Just imagine someone recording porn with this....
User avatar #76 to #70 - afewasianbitches (06/09/2013) [-]
It'd probably take ten hours for the chick to order the pizza if not longer.


and nobody wants cold pizza
#103 - asdflower (06/09/2013) [+] (3 replies)
how can we be sure someone doesn't have a flashlight and moves it slowly over the bottle?
how can we be sure someone doesn't have a flashlight and moves it slowly over the bottle?
#117 - goofyplease (06/09/2013) [-]
Its a very interesting piece of technology, however the camera doesn't record a trillion frames per second. The same beam of light is being fired over and over again, and the same frame is recorded with slightly different timing each time with an incredibly fast shutterspeed.    
   
Mentioned in the video: If you were to watch an ordinary bullet travel the same distance, at the same slow motion factor the movie would take a year to watch.
Its a very interesting piece of technology, however the camera doesn't record a trillion frames per second. The same beam of light is being fired over and over again, and the same frame is recorded with slightly different timing each time with an incredibly fast shutterspeed.

Mentioned in the video: If you were to watch an ordinary bullet travel the same distance, at the same slow motion factor the movie would take a year to watch.
User avatar #77 - masdercheef (06/09/2013) [+] (5 replies)
Now, the question is.... why would we ever need a camera that can shoot one trillion frames per second?
User avatar #78 to #77 - killjoyIIII (06/09/2013) [-]
to record light
User avatar #111 - rushian (06/09/2013) [+] (1 reply)
www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y_9vd4HWlVA
The TED talk about it, if anyone is interested. It's really ******* cool.
#144 - EventHorizon (06/09/2013) [+] (2 replies)
One of the coolest aspects of this experiment is that you get to see an unprecedented example of the quantum duality of light. That is, its properties as both a wave and a particle. You can see it acting in particle form, shooting down the length of the bottle. But as it interacts with matter, you can see on the table below how the light radiates in waves. It's such bizarre behavior to see with the human eye. I don't think people realize the fact that this simple experiment with a flashlight and a coke bottle defines the modern contention between general relativity and quantum mechanics.
One of the coolest aspects of this experiment is that you get to see an unprecedented example of the quantum duality of light. That is, its properties as both a wave and a particle. You can see it acting in particle form, shooting down the length of the bottle. But as it interacts with matter, you can see on the table below how the light radiates in waves. It's such bizarre behavior to see with the human eye. I don't think people realize the fact that this simple experiment with a flashlight and a coke bottle defines the modern contention between general relativity and quantum mechanics.
#125 - shockstorm (06/09/2013) [+] (6 replies)
This looks like it would be a very fun camera to have. Also, I'm interested in how it can record so many Frames per Second. Can someone enlighten me on the subject?
#72 - rainbowhead (06/09/2013) [-]
Comment Picture
User avatar #3 - gidmp (06/09/2013) [+] (1 reply)
I've seen this from TED around half a year ago, it was awesome.
#162 - unclegrumpybastard (06/10/2013) [+] (3 replies)
well....sounds interesting but without seeing anything else as reference it could also be someone running an led torch along the other side of the bottle at an angle....
well....sounds interesting but without seeing anything else as reference it could also be someone running an led torch along the other side of the bottle at an angle....
#93 - redtooth (06/09/2013) [+] (1 reply)
Goddamit, the gif already ended before I saw it and won't loop properly. When I refresh, it's just stuck at the end again.
Goddamit, the gif already ended before I saw it and won't loop properly. When I refresh, it's just stuck at the end again.
User avatar #102 to #93 - desmondaltairezio (06/09/2013) [-]
>right click
>open image in new tab
annoying but it works
#52 - flyinarrow (06/09/2013) [+] (2 replies)
Ah hah, i have done this before, the process is quite simple, yet quite complicated, in a way.
The way that this is done is that it is all recorded by a single camera with an incredibly fast shutter speed, not a camcorder, but a camera...that takes still pictures.
And then you get something that generates a flash of light, a flash that is faster than can possibly be seen by human eyes, thus why the beam is so short.
And then you take pictures at different moments every time this flash happens, tens of thousands of times.
Then you stitch together the resulting pictures into a clip, and above would be the result.
I hope this clarifies to some on how it is done.
And also there is a video on YouTube demonstrating how it is done, thus how i was able to do it myself as well.
Again, this is not all done in one shot, rather done in many, many takes, like a scene in a movie
User avatar #121 - trchamp (06/09/2013) [-]
Damn coca-cola with their product placement
#37 - Zyklone (06/09/2013) [-]
This image has expired
#151 - Womens Study Major (06/09/2013) [+] (2 replies)
Imagine all the video games at 1 trillion fps.

Must be what heaven is like.
#160 to #151 - juha (06/10/2013) [-]
playing Quake III like a pro.
User avatar #142 - jesusthegardener (06/09/2013) [+] (3 replies)
or someone just walked past the ******* bottle with a flashlight
#40 - Womens Study Major (06/09/2013) [+] (2 replies)
i'm calling ******** . Why does the light just fade away afterwards?
User avatar #48 to #40 - SmuttyKage (06/09/2013) [-]
refraction. Light is absorbed by all objects. If the object is opaque, say like a bottle cap, the light fades as it is absorbed by the object. if it is traslucent or transparent like the plastic, light keep travelling.
#182 - gladiuss (06/10/2013) [+] (1 reply)
Light from a flashlight is a constant flow of photons, not a single quanta of visible light. The fact that the light source seems to move through the coke bottle while ILLUMINATING it's surroundings is in direct contradiction to the impossibility of a flashlight generating a SINGLE, detectable photon.

Youtube is a reliable source of consistently UN-reliable information. I call ******** .
#181 - wyldek ONLINE (06/10/2013) [-]
Speed of light through water ≈ 224900568 m/s
Length of a 24 oz coke bottle ≈ 10 inches (0.254 m)
Length of gif is ≈ 8 seconds
1 trillion frames per second means each frame is 0.000000001 s.
8 seconds= 8 trillion frames = 0.000000008 s


Total "real" time of gif in seconds ≈ 8e-9
Total time required for light to go .254 m through water = 10.29e-9

I had my doubts, but it looks legit.
Error is almost certainly caused by my counting the length of the gif poorly.
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