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#352 - anon
Reply 0
(06/26/2014) [-]
It's a shame weaboos will deny this and instead think Japan is just like in anime .
#353 to #352 - bizengaust [OP]
Reply +1
(06/26/2014) [-]
ah well what can you do. I hope the comps at least give some insight.
#365 to #353 - citizenofnecrocity ONLINE
Reply 0
(06/26/2014) [-]
My only experience with Japan comes from anime, but only a fool holds Japan as a promised land. No, I do want to visit, and depending on that visit, I may move there, but it's more of the fact that I enjoy their polite attitudes most. Americans are freaking rude...
#302 - kschmidty
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(06/19/2014) [-]
Do you have any advice for learning how to read the language?
#307 to #302 - bizengaust [OP]
Reply +1
(06/19/2014) [-]
I took classes on it. Some people can learn by books also but I found having an instructor to be best.
#354 to #302 - testaburger
Reply +1
(06/26/2014) [-]
Start by memorizing hiragana/katakana, then take classes.
#357 to #302 - dapperclapper
Reply +1
(06/26/2014) [-]
www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZEA54VJEdE

Watch this. It's a Japanese course by an American guy who teaches English in Japan. He is wasted off his ass roughly 100% of the time, but his videos are surprisingly good for somebody who drinks his own weight in alcohol.
#286 - ytzion
Reply 0
(06/19/2014) [-]
Have you ever been called or considered a "gajin"?I've heard that some japanese are racist toward the foreigners
#296 to #286 - bizengaust [OP]
Reply +1
(06/19/2014) [-]
I've only been called that once when I was on a train to Tokyo.
#298 to #296 - ytzion
Reply 0
(06/19/2014) [-]
Can I ask you why?
#299 to #298 - bizengaust [OP]
Reply +1
(06/19/2014) [-]
I'm not totally sure but I think they thought I was going to be another otaku foreigner
#311 to #299 - ironsoul
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(06/19/2014) [-]
Isn't it actually a slur? I've heard it means "moon eye" or something along those lines
#314 to #311 - bizengaust [OP]
Reply 0
(06/19/2014) [-]
It translates to outside person or foreingner
#283 - bingleshmink
Reply +1
(06/19/2014) [-]
I heard Japan just outlawed child pornography.
#342 to #283 - anon
Reply 0
(06/20/2014) [-]
must have been a very hard decision for them
#262 - nucularwar
Reply +1
(06/19/2014) [-]
Quick question OP, do you know the meaning of the word "myth?"
#274 to #262 - spidahridah
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(06/19/2014) [-]
#260 - chimpaflimp
Reply +1
(06/19/2014) [-]
Do Japanese people believe vaginas do, in fact, look like mosaics?
#243 - Awesomecarrot
Reply 0
(06/19/2014) [-]
This was really informative.
I'd LOVE to go one day but I'm just afraid of seeming ignorant or rude!
#249 to #243 - livefromtokyo
Reply +1
(06/19/2014) [-]
I sure you will be fine. It depends on where you go (I live in tokyo) but they do give a lot of leeway to gaijin (or foreigners).
I think I'm going to try to make a comp. on the Do's and Dont's for gaijin coming to Japan since people seem interested though...
#271 to #249 - smokekusheveryday
Reply +1
(06/19/2014) [-]
gaijin ........ first thought of company that owns war thunder
then the realization hit
#250 to #249 - Awesomecarrot
Reply 0
(06/19/2014) [-]
Ah please do so!
#257 to #250 - livefromtokyo
Reply 0
(06/19/2014) [-]
well alrighty then
#226 - azraelthemage
Reply 0
(06/19/2014) [-]
I've heard that they view the "Peace" sign a little differently than we do here in the states. Someone once told me that they view it the same way we do the "Middle Finger". Is this true? And why is that?

Another question I have is, whenever they make any work of fiction based on a foreign country (I'll use the states as an example), do they really have any idea how things work here? No seriously, in the video game "Catherine", everything about it screams "He lives in a Japanese town", but they pass it off as being set in an American city. Normally, I'd just write it off as bad localization, but that's hard to say when every characters is anything but Japanese. Do they even have a clue as to what other countries' cultures are really like?
#238 to #226 - livefromtokyo
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(06/19/2014) [-]
No, no no no- that is not at all true. Everyone does the peace sign- although i don't think they would understand what you meant if you said "peace sign".
Actually, i think it's pretty darn fascinating the way japanese view pictures.
1) they take them all the time: when they get their food, when they see something cute, when they want to be in the picture with said cute thing, when they are all hanging out together. (you should google "purikura" and look up the whole culture behind that)

2) Although the peace sign is the most common hand gesture to do in japan (Ive seen even toddlers produce a peace sign when they see a camera) It is not the only hand gesture that people make for pictures. There are around 20 gestures that people make to look cute. (mostly girls although guys are expected to be cute too)
More examples :
izismile.com/2012/01/24/this_is_how_asians_pose_96_pics.html
#276 to #238 - drainbramage
Reply 0
(06/19/2014) [-]
I just understood it as the peace sign in Japan is like a toned down thumbs up or something to that affect
#285 to #276 - livefromtokyo
Reply +1
(06/19/2014) [-]
Well, the peace sign photo pose could be compared to the tradition of saying "cheese" before a photo (in the Untied States).

Saying "cheese" for a photo tends to make people smile. In Japan, the peace sign has become a visual "cheese" — a cue to the photographer that you're ready for the photo. Like saying cheese — it makes them feel more photogenic somehow.
#331 to #285 - drainbramage
Reply 0
(06/19/2014) [-]
Thank you very much Japanese knowledge person
Thank you very much Japanese knowledge person
#341 to #331 - livefromtokyo
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(06/20/2014) [-]
haha- not a problem.

Im actually living in Tokyo right now making documentaries about japanese culture- so most definitely not a problem. If you have anymore question don't be shy
#264 to #226 - livefromtokyo
Reply 0
(06/19/2014) [-]
And sorry that I didn't answer your second question:

Hmm.. I would say that the Japanese , in general, are as globally aware as most southern americans. Japan is pretty insular.
#221 - silkisberg
Reply -1
(06/19/2014) [-]
*roll image* japan
#222 to #221 - silkisberg
Reply 0
(06/19/2014) [-]
what. the. ****.
#236 to #222 - bloopzoop
Reply 0
(06/19/2014) [-]
**bloopzoop rolled image** say "*roll picture* instead
#247 to #236 - silkisberg
Reply +1
(06/19/2014) [-]
**silkisberg rolled image** Been a while..
#230 to #222 - bestfoxgirl
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(06/19/2014) [-]
**bestfoxgirl rolled image**

it's 'picture' instead of 'image'
#132 - exarzero
Reply +1
(06/19/2014) [-]
Thank you.
#114 - saltyfries
Reply +1
(06/19/2014) [-]
I remember back in college actually meeting a Japanese girl, well she was born in Japan and had the look of a Japanese girl, but her father was born in my hometown who lives in Japan now, she came to my hometown for a sweet reason, to see her father's home. You would be amazed what I learned just from her!
2 things, one, most Americans (including myself) do not identify themselves as American in background, we tend to include our European ancestors or something to that effect instead, her father had a Swedish background. So it's actually curious to say I'm American instead of talking about our ancestry that we're German, Swedish, or English.
2nd, most Japanese (including herself) still haven't heard of extremely popular places, rides, shows, or stuff like that! I'm a roller coaster buff and I showed this to our class, she had never heard of it and she didn't know it was in Japan!
Steel Dragon 2000 POV World's Longest Roller Coaster Nagashima Spaland Japan
The best part of Japan imo, is how they've actually accepted 2 American sports into their culture, Baseball and Pro Wrestling, and they REALLY treat the latter as an art and with respect! It's insane! Watch any Japanese pro wrestling match and you can see a huge difference between them and WWE.

Pic related, New Japan Pro Wrestling's Hiroshi Tanahashi, 2 time Pro Wrestler of the Year!
#82 - somethingpants
Reply +1
(06/19/2014) [-]
I would guess the thing about perversion would be more like being suppressed for so long that when you eventually let the metaphorical floodgates open, it comes out like a big wave unlike when you aren't suppressed and you can express it little by little.
Also, sex not being discussed as openly in media and public as it is in the US--mainly saying what is and isn't accepted, like fetishes and whatnot--and therefor not knowing what would be seen as 'right'. Like tentacle porn or enemas.
#72 - mastercolossus
Reply +1
(06/19/2014) [-]
**mastercolossus rolled image**
for one thing japanese porn is censored, and because of that the quality of the other stuff beyond the size of the penis and the appearance of the vagina like plot and acting is so much more important because of that.
#50 - anon
Reply 0
(06/19/2014) [-]
9) They can speak English very good.
*well
#52 to #50 - bizengaust [OP]
Reply +1
(06/19/2014) [-]
I wrote it that way on purpose. When you ask someone in Japan if they can speak English , they will say they speak it good because that's how it translates to them.
#53 to #52 - anon
Reply 0
(06/19/2014) [-]
#47 - davemill
Reply +1
(06/19/2014) [-]
#45 - dribble
Reply 0
(06/19/2014) [-]
From your comp, I got the impression that English is becoming more and more common throughout Japan. I was wondering, in your opinion, do you think there is a future for English Teachers (I mean a high demand) in Japan within the next 5-10 years? In your last comp, I asked about JET programs and Amity I think it was. I'm learning both Chinese and Japanese, and may be looking to teach in one of those countries.

Also, do the Japanese dress their dogs up? I've been to Taiwan quite a few times, and I can say that dressing a dog up is quite popular. Not quite like this though...
#49 to #45 - bizengaust [OP]
Reply +1
(06/19/2014) [-]
Since Japan does a lot of trade with English speaking countries I think there will always be a demand for English speaking teachers.  Also, since it opens you up to more options as far as working in the country or abroad, parents will pay a decent amount for their children to be exposed to the language.   
I have seen people dress up their dogs here. My boss, who is an elderly Japanese lady of 50, has a dachshund that she constantly in little sweaters. I have also seen a lot of young girls in Harajuku dress up their tiny dogs and walk about with them.
Since Japan does a lot of trade with English speaking countries I think there will always be a demand for English speaking teachers. Also, since it opens you up to more options as far as working in the country or abroad, parents will pay a decent amount for their children to be exposed to the language.
I have seen people dress up their dogs here. My boss, who is an elderly Japanese lady of 50, has a dachshund that she constantly in little sweaters. I have also seen a lot of young girls in Harajuku dress up their tiny dogs and walk about with them.
#17 - angelusprimus
Reply 0
(06/18/2014) [-]
I asked this the last time, so I'm trying again.
Did you have problems for being russian descent? During my visits I noticed that Russians have a very bad reputation for being loud and rude and not following the rules.
#23 to #17 - bizengaust [OP]
Reply +1
(06/18/2014) [-]
I'm sorry I meant to work this one in but it got lost in the cracks. When I first came to Japan and they saw on my application that I was Russian-American I was introduced to this stereotype. The funny thing is that in Russia people are very polite. Men carry bags for woman,people give up their seats for the elderly, woman help out around the house,ect. We are also a very stubborn people though and most Russians hate when you try to tell them what to do. I think this is where that notion was birthed from, and the fact that when we party we party loud and have fun.
As long as you respect them and their culture they will be understanding and do the same to you so I don't get treated any different then my other teachers. Except for a few awkward questions about communism but I get that anywhere.
#35 to #23 - angelusprimus
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(06/18/2014) [-]
I'm from Bosnia, I find Russians great company.
#12 - evilredmuffin
Reply +1
(06/18/2014) [-]
Comment Picture
#11 - icewizardftw
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(06/18/2014) [-]
I'm curious as to how women stand in Japanese society. I know they have equal rights but are still stuck to stricter social standards than men. What was your experience like? Also congrats on your engagement
#15 to #11 - bizengaust [OP]
Reply +1
(06/18/2014) [-]
Woman have gone a long way in Japan as far as equal rights go. It used to be that you would just stay home and be an okusan (housewife) and even if you chose to go to work, you'd just be a simple office lady. Now woman can be CEO's if they want to or run for political positions. My own experience was that of a lot of my other female teachers both Japanese and other, and that is you have to work extra hard to show you're able to do just as well as the male workers.
My own experiences have been pretty good and there have only been a few circumstances where I've had to explain that despite being a woman, I could still work just as hard and handle myself just fine. Sexual harassment is still a bit of an issue but companies crack down on it a lot harder then they used to. Thank you for the congrats ^_^
#20 to #15 - icewizardftw
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(06/18/2014) [-]
What about certain social etiquette like women not being able to open their mouth's wide. I also heard women showing cleavage is frowned upon but skirt length isn't. I'm Also curious as to whether women are trying to changes these or are just accepting of them. I ask seeing as Feminism is a hot topic of the internet and I am under the impression that women might have it worse in Japan than America.
#25 to #20 - bizengaust [OP]
Reply +1
(06/18/2014) [-]
Woman are still expected to be ladies here so things like a loud voice,rude manners,can really make people think less of you. I've never understood the whole, "don't show your boobs but leg is ok" thing myself really. Woman are trying very much for changes here even now. They want the freedom to act like normal people without being deemed social garbage if they don't fit into the stereotypical view of what woman should be. They want to be able to dress casually at work without their professionalism being taken into question and they want to be able to act like people instead of robots.
#34 to #25 - icewizardftw
Reply +1
(06/18/2014) [-]
Thank you for answering my questions! I look forward to the next comp.