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What do you think? Give us your opinion. Anonymous comments allowed.
User avatar #3383 - zealotgold (11/30/2014) [-]
so how deadly is krokodil? and what do you think is the worlds worst drug? and why?
User avatar #3382 - drastronomy (11/29/2014) [-]
Is there a limit to how hot an item can be

Does it stop when the particles vibrate at lightspeed, if they can do that at all?
User avatar #3387 to #3382 - frikandelspeciaal (11/30/2014) [-]
I'm not an expert on the matter, but i looked it up and apperently there is a theoretical maximum temperatured called "absolute hot" which is about 1.416785 × 10^32.

This is 14167850000000000000000000000000K or 7871027777800000000000000000000°F

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absolute_hot
#3373 - anonymous (11/29/2014) [-]
Yo when they say the sun is 27 million degrees, do they actually know that, or is that just they way of saying "really fuckin hot"? Like how the fuck would they figure that out.
User avatar #3389 to #3373 - iridium (11/30/2014) [-]
There's usually scales you can use to project it based on analyzing the light waves. 27,000,000 is more of an estimate, it's not set in stone and the temperature changes all the time, though it's still always too fuckin hot.
User avatar #3376 to #3373 - magnuskasparov (11/29/2014) [-]
Well first scientists calculate how far the sun is and then they use a device to break up the light into the light spectrum, like those prisms. Then they look at the absorption lines which every element has and calculate the heat based on chemical properties of elements. If you took a chemistry course in college you will understand what black lines I'm referring to
#3374 to #3373 - anonymous (11/29/2014) [-]
science bitch

think its more an rough estimate, can't really prove it wrong
#3369 - anonymous (11/29/2014) [-]
anyone know where those cancer monies goes, haven't there been like 10 giga millions donated, are they all buying mansions doing cocaine on hookers butts and drinking premium whiskey til dawn just to repeat it over again
anyone know where those cancer monies goes, haven't there been like 10 giga millions donated, are they all buying mansions doing cocaine on hookers butts and drinking premium whiskey til dawn just to repeat it over again
User avatar #3390 to #3369 - iridium (11/30/2014) [-]
Depends on the charity. For instance, the ALS Association puts about 28% of their donations towards the actual research with the rest going towards marketing, education, community services, administration (about 7%) and fundraising. Most of them, even if not-for-profit, still have to pay their workers.

You can usually read their tax records on their website as any non-profit company is required to publish their tax records.
User avatar #3380 to #3369 - magnuskasparov (11/29/2014) [-]
half goes to advertising, the other half goes to the ceo
#3358 - hauntzor (11/28/2014) [-]
I just thought about this today.

My friend was talking to me about emetophilia (becoming sexually aroused by vomit) and linked me to a picture drawn by a vomit fetishist. I immediately stopped desiring the milk that I was drinking.

Is there an evolutionary reason as to why we lose our appetite after seeing something morbid and/or unpleasant?
User avatar #3391 to #3358 - iridium (11/30/2014) [-]
Basically what everyone else said for gross stuff.

As for something Morbid though, it's something else. Morbid stuff (blood and gore) would typically mean in the wild that danger was present. Usually when something dangerous happens it activates the sympathetic nervous system which slows digestion considerably and constricts the digestive system (also making you sort of lose your appetite). Also seeing something severely wounded would probably create an empathetic mental response sort of like "ugh, imagine if that happened to me." It's kind of similar.
#3375 to #3358 - anonymous (11/29/2014) [-]
If people ate communally, and one person started vomiting, that would mean that the food is most likely not good to eat.
#3367 to #3358 - anonymous (11/29/2014) [-]
Did you really need the backstory

fuck man that's gross
User avatar #3368 to #3367 - hauntzor (11/29/2014) [-]
I wanted to share my pain.
User avatar #3359 to #3358 - christmouth (11/28/2014) [-]
Appearance of food might indicate if it is rotten or not, and we might have developed to disdain things that appear to be rotten, giving us an advantage over the ones that were not grossed over food which might have been spoiled.
#3356 - logickid (11/27/2014) [-]
For some reason all of my main body parts are all different, head is chubby, torso is fat, arms are skinny, and legs are stronk
User avatar #3377 to #3356 - magnuskasparov (11/29/2014) [-]
everyone's body deposits fat in one's body differently
This is why spot-fat reduction does not usually work and why sometimes it may seem like it did. This is also why some people can't lose manhandles even though they've been working out a lot.
#3355 - lawlzanimeguy (11/26/2014) [-]
Can anybody tell me how to calculate the area of this shape, please ?
User avatar #3357 to #3355 - skrasnic (11/27/2014) [-]
Area of big circle minus area of little circle multiplyed by the angle of the section over 360

A1-A2 x angle/360
User avatar #3346 - cognosceteipsum (11/25/2014) [-]
What is the first something to ever have been ever in the existence of everything(not just this jewniverse)?
User avatar #3414 to #3346 - mvtjets (12/02/2014) [-]
Gawd and jeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeezzaus
User avatar #3392 to #3346 - iridium (11/30/2014) [-]
It's very theoretical.

Personally I feel that we human beings believe too much in the concept of "beginning" and "end", as though something has to be created. I think the theory that makes the most sense is the one of "everything that ever was and ever will be has and always has been here in some form or another". It most fits in with the laws of physics.

In the end though it's a fairly pointless question in science.
User avatar #3378 to #3346 - magnuskasparov (11/29/2014) [-]
No one knows, all theories break down at the exact moment the universe was created. The big bang is based off the small amount of time after it happened which might not seem like much to us, but to the creation of a universe it is a lot. The big bang theory is the most accepted because it explains a lot about our universe and even then it can't explain anything before it. That's the question scientists are trying to answer, what came before? what was first? how will it end?
#3370 to #3346 - anonymous (11/29/2014) [-]
some superior praying mantis god created a black space. no way all this nonsene we call ourself the world wasn't made up

a football? beer? fuck you i want my checks
User avatar #3372 to #3370 - cognosceteipsum (11/29/2014) [-]
Anyone can decode what this anon is trying to say?
User avatar #3351 to #3346 - sciencexplain (11/26/2014) [-]
If you mean the first thing to appear when the universe created, I'm not sure how to answer that. I mean, the start of the universe in theory was a singularity of everything compressed to a point, expanding outwards with incomprehensible amounts of energy. The start of the universe was mainly a lot of very hot gases. I, personally, choose to believe that it was all basic hydrogen atoms in suspended gas, and the extreme energy caused particle collisions, which made reactions that created atoms of new elements. Push came to shove, and eventually we had fuckton big asteroids and rocks that smashed together, a giant mass of hydrogen started burning, gravity came into play and that's basically our solar system.
User avatar #3349 to #3346 - sugoi ONLINE (11/26/2014) [-]
Probably a hydrogen atom iunno.
User avatar #3348 to #3346 - theguywithaplan (11/25/2014) [-]
We have no proof that there was anything before our universe. So the first thing ever was the universe.
User avatar #3350 to #3348 - cognosceteipsum (11/26/2014) [-]
What was the first thing ever in the universe then?


and what will be the last?
User avatar #3352 to #3350 - theguywithaplan (11/26/2014) [-]
You're asking questions no one can answer.
User avatar #3353 to #3352 - cognosceteipsum (11/26/2014) [-]
Which one of them
User avatar #3354 to #3353 - theguywithaplan (11/26/2014) [-]
both of them.
User avatar #3340 - Conquistador ONLINE (11/24/2014) [-]
It's a detriment to society that we allow subhumanity to exist.
User avatar #3393 to #3340 - iridium (11/30/2014) [-]
So someone with a Nazi Tails avatar?
#3341 to #3340 - anonymous (11/24/2014) [-]
Then kill yourself.
User avatar #3343 to #3341 - Conquistador ONLINE (11/25/2014) [-]
Make me, goy.
#3325 - idgafdude (11/20/2014) [-]
recently had oral surgery, Monday to be exact, on the roof of my mouth to extract a tooth that never grew out. To make a long story short, I masterbated, (excuse me for my vulgarity) and my father told me that this could cause a blood clot where the wound is, which could lead to a serious infection. I am extremely scared, and my face is feeling rather strange, what can I do, or what can you tell me!
User avatar #3336 to #3325 - ribocoon (11/23/2014) [-]
No
Just wasted time
And a little internalized guilt and self hatred
Your dad is a dick
User avatar #3324 - niimajneb ONLINE (11/19/2014) [-]
I have a tank of helium, and I was wondering if anyone knew how to tell if there's still helium inside of it.
User avatar #3338 to #3324 - thewizsam (11/23/2014) [-]
puy a match in front of it
User avatar #3344 to #3338 - jsereturns (11/25/2014) [-]
Helium doesn't burn
User avatar #3347 to #3344 - thewizsam (11/25/2014) [-]
stfu this was 2 days ago
User avatar #3360 to #3347 - jsereturns (11/29/2014) [-]
Well, not much is posted on /science/
I was just saying though...
User avatar #3361 to #3360 - thewizsam (11/29/2014) [-]
BRO 2 DAY AGAIN SERIOUSLY?!?!?
User avatar #3362 to #3361 - jsereturns (11/29/2014) [-]
Yeah.... well, see you on monday.
#3363 to #3362 - thewizsam (11/29/2014) [-]
**thewizsam rolled image** YES I FUCKING WIN FUCK YOU!!!!!!!! IT HASEN'T BEEN 2 DAYS BITCH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!111
User avatar #3364 to #3363 - jsereturns (11/29/2014) [-]
yeah... but helium still doesn't burn...
User avatar #3366 to #3365 - jsereturns (11/29/2014) [-]
You will... when i remind you monday
User avatar #3326 to #3324 - frikandelspeciaal (11/20/2014) [-]
Is it pressurized?

Try filling a balloon with it
User avatar #3327 to #3326 - niimajneb ONLINE (11/20/2014) [-]
I don't have a balloon, it's for 'scientific' purposes.
User avatar #3328 to #3327 - frikandelspeciaal (11/20/2014) [-]
Do you know it there is still pressure in the tank?

Does t have a pressure gage?
Does it make a small noise of gas escaping when you open it up?
User avatar #3329 to #3328 - niimajneb ONLINE (11/20/2014) [-]
It doesn't have a gauge, but when I tried to open it then I heard and felt nothing, but maybe I didn't open it properly. I'll try again next time I need it.
User avatar #3330 to #3329 - misticalz ONLINE (11/22/2014) [-]
dont kill yourself
User avatar #3331 to #3330 - niimajneb ONLINE (11/22/2014) [-]
I've made up my mind, sorry.
User avatar #3337 to #3331 - wallbuilder (11/23/2014) [-]
pls no
#3320 - redbread (11/16/2014) [-]
Hey guys, is there anyone here who knows (or knows where to find) concrete informations on how the human body and brain react to music? I lurked a bit, but the essential things that I find are basically some shit you find on facebook like "Top ten cool stuff that music does to you" which isn't very serious.

So if anyone wants to share his science or his sources I'd be happy to read them and discuss about it.
#3317 - kristofe (11/16/2014) [-]
hey i don't really know where to ask this but does anyone know a website with just cool little science toys or not toys just cool little science things i am trying to get my nephew interested in science and he loves my little plasma ball and what not
User avatar #3379 to #3317 - magnuskasparov (11/29/2014) [-]
instead of being a dick like that other guy, I will give you links to the channels I've watched that specialize in science toys

www.stevespanglerscience.com/collections.html
www.grand-illusions.com/
www.thinkgeek.com/geektoys/science/
#3381 to #3379 - kristofe (11/29/2014) [-]
cool thanks man
#3316 - enderyoshi (11/16/2014) [-]
when the world ends
when the world ends
0
#3315 - cliffordlover has deleted their comment [-]
#3314 - anonymous (11/15/2014) [-]
Is there a field of science on utilizing microscopic organism for things other then medicine?
User avatar #3342 to #3314 - ribocoon (11/24/2014) [-]
do like batteries and stuff
User avatar #3321 to #3314 - dudeheit (11/16/2014) [-]
Well scientifically spoken it's still microbiology but with an industrial use, not medicin.
User avatar #3318 to #3314 - dudeheit (11/16/2014) [-]
Yes there is. For example enzymes which split proteins, fat or carbs (proteases, lipases and amylases) are used in washing products.
#3319 to #3318 - anonymous (11/16/2014) [-]
what's the field?
User avatar #3323 to #3319 - Mortuus ONLINE (11/19/2014) [-]
That'd probably fall under "Applied Microbiology"
User avatar #3309 - vashford (11/15/2014) [-]
Just wanted to share this video with you all.

In my AP Chem class one of my classmates made a rap pertaining to the solubility rules.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=5adgmtvYK4Y

Pretty sick.



#3306 - cheastnut ONLINE (11/14/2014) [-]
I have to do a Monroe's motivation persuasive speech. I want my thesis to be something along the lines of "we should have more effort/interest in space exploration"   
for those who don't know Monroe's motivation persuasive speech has 5 steps : attention, the need (what kind of problem exists), satisfaction (how to fix the problem),visualization (what will happen after we fix or don't the problem), conclusion/ call to action (motivate people to help fix the problem)   
what I need is what kind of problem is there in space exploration? I'm thinking that if you take into account the quantity of minerals (like iron) thus the price of building the ships would drop and the money can instead go to fuel.   
then there are things like solar power farms. things that can make a monetary return.   
types of problems I'm thinking of is that nobody feels there's money in space. especially sense there's is a document signed that says every one has a right to space or something about how no one can own property beyond earth.   
if there's anything you can say to help with ideas that'd be great.
I have to do a Monroe's motivation persuasive speech. I want my thesis to be something along the lines of "we should have more effort/interest in space exploration"
for those who don't know Monroe's motivation persuasive speech has 5 steps : attention, the need (what kind of problem exists), satisfaction (how to fix the problem),visualization (what will happen after we fix or don't the problem), conclusion/ call to action (motivate people to help fix the problem)
what I need is what kind of problem is there in space exploration? I'm thinking that if you take into account the quantity of minerals (like iron) thus the price of building the ships would drop and the money can instead go to fuel.
then there are things like solar power farms. things that can make a monetary return.
types of problems I'm thinking of is that nobody feels there's money in space. especially sense there's is a document signed that says every one has a right to space or something about how no one can own property beyond earth.
if there's anything you can say to help with ideas that'd be great.
User avatar #3307 to #3306 - sciencexplain (11/14/2014) [-]
The main problem I've been studying in space, at the moment, is safety measures. Humans are so bad with pollution that they're killing the Earth. Whilst Mars has potential, it's not too good for life and support. We should be looking elsewhere for opportunities to start a new human race on that planet, which can sustain human life and holds many minerals and resources. The problem is, none are close to us, and they're all so far away that it's too long for us. What we need is research into wormholes and space travel, and find a way to study it to discover space travel by traversing dimensions. Your work sounds more financial/business/economic based, which I'm going to assume is your strong point, so I would say to you that you could look into the implications of expanding our knowledge of space travel for financial and resource purposes. If we can understand space travel better, we can harvest resources from other planets and transport them to Earth, and there are possibilities for things like discovery of new elements and materials, so it's quite promising. There is, of course, the matter of saving the human race if it's in danger, but I think there's enough for you to pick a topic to work on.
#3310 to #3307 - simplify (11/15/2014) [-]
Hello Sciencexplain, I have to agree with you on some points, while disagree with many others. While mars is (at the moment ) impossible to live on, with terraformation of the surface of Mars, humans have a great chance of extending the lifespan of the species. We have little to no idea what minerals lay beneath the surface of Mars, and in relation to space-travel to other possibly habitable planets, mars seems to be a match made in hea SCIENCE!!! ven.   
Putting an end to pollution is not an easy task, it may be the hardest thing man kind will ever have to do( If ever ). We have recently found comments and asteroids filled with precious metals and elements, and with recent events (Rosetta's spacecraft landing) we have very little need to mine the earth any further, will this happen within our lifetime? Its is unlikely. The way I see humanity's future in the next millenium is to conquer space travel and be able to planet hop and gather resources till the very last star in the nearly infinite universes dies out. We are a highly destructive species and a n infinite power source with zero cons is a mad man's delusion.   
   
Please feel free to reply .
Hello Sciencexplain, I have to agree with you on some points, while disagree with many others. While mars is (at the moment ) impossible to live on, with terraformation of the surface of Mars, humans have a great chance of extending the lifespan of the species. We have little to no idea what minerals lay beneath the surface of Mars, and in relation to space-travel to other possibly habitable planets, mars seems to be a match made in hea SCIENCE!!! ven.
Putting an end to pollution is not an easy task, it may be the hardest thing man kind will ever have to do( If ever ). We have recently found comments and asteroids filled with precious metals and elements, and with recent events (Rosetta's spacecraft landing) we have very little need to mine the earth any further, will this happen within our lifetime? Its is unlikely. The way I see humanity's future in the next millenium is to conquer space travel and be able to planet hop and gather resources till the very last star in the nearly infinite universes dies out. We are a highly destructive species and a n infinite power source with zero cons is a mad man's delusion.

Please feel free to reply .
User avatar #3311 to #3310 - sciencexplain (11/15/2014) [-]
Well, you certainly raise a few good points. I feel I must retort with what is probably one of the most heard of things of the human race: We have an insatiable lust for knowledge and exploration. We could planet hop and drill comets and such for minerals or whatever, but as humans, it's in our nature to explore and learn. We won't be content with just that, we'll want to expand further and become greater, even if it means tackling issues of spacial dimensions and such. I feel, personally, that Mars isn't as good a planet for life as you seem to think. In terms of sustaining life that isn't ours, there isn't much in the way of plantation potential or water sources. There may be water under the surface for drilling and mining, but the costs to repeatedly explore Mars with equipment we send over will be astronomical. huehuehue Food sources would be scarce on Mars. What would be best is if we could make Mars the perfect self-sustainable planet, that wouldn't need shipments of resources, especially food. Mars is nowhere near how Earth is in terms of that, and it would be a mighty task indeed to make it happen.
User avatar #3312 to #3311 - simplify (11/15/2014) [-]
Dead Can Dance - Host of Seraphim Mars is, at the moment a lifeless rock, dusty rock with less than 1% of the atmosphere of earth, I am by no means saying colonization or terraformation in our day and age is along the lines "feasible". However with the grandiose size of our universe, mars seems to be withing the realms of reason to allocate the population of humans withing the next several centuries. I hate to get stuck on one subject for too long but Mars is so perfect for what we as humans look for in a planet and it is sitting within our own neck of the planetary woods. The costs and time we as a race would need to devote to a project along this scale is unfathomable, be as a species without war and isolation it is within the realms of reason. While it is not ascertainable to know when or if we will have the technology to travel from star to star within the next hundred years, we stand a fighting chance as a species to live on two of our eight planets then on just one.

Please enjoy the video, it is one of my favorites. Put it all in perspective.
User avatar #3313 to #3312 - xsnowshark (11/15/2014) [-]
www.universetoday.com/14702/what-is-mars-made-of/

As you can see, even if we could get Mars, and assuming we had the heavy lift capability to get things off of Earth and an SSO vehicle that could be used on Mars (these are both tremendous assumptions), it would be pointless to try to teraform the planet. The lack of a magnetic field would make it impossible to grow anything and people would not be able to go outside unless they wore protective suits. What we should do is resurrect the Constellation program. This would get us experience on living on an extraterrestrial body, but still leave us close enough to Earth so that if something went wrong it would not be that hard to get people back.
User avatar #3303 - thewillow (11/12/2014) [-]
What is "now" is an illusion caused by the current state of your brain relative to your environment. The universe is timeless with time being a frozen river. So all of the particles that make us up are all going to exist forever in the positions they are in space-time, but since we exist as the process stemming from the interaction of these particles, we only exist until the interaction of particles in our head ends.
User avatar #3305 to #3303 - sugoi ONLINE (11/13/2014) [-]
This is /science/ it's not for your hoity toity philosophical bullshit.
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