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#5492 - pittheus
Reply 0
(06/02/2016) [-]
Can anyone explain why E = mc2 is such a well known equation? Is it incredibly useful or just something that was previously thought impossible?
#5591 to #5492 - mublerking
Reply 0
(07/16/2016) [-]
I'd argue that, of all the relativistic principles (short of einsteins equation relating the energy momentum to the riemann curvature, thus describing how forces and matter affect the curving of spacetime, or if you prefer how the curving of spacetime results in force) that it is the most important. In its alternate form, it expresses the mass shell p^2=m^2 (this is the 4-momentum which is just p^2=E^2-p^2 where that second p is the normal momentum), which is the basis of determining whether or not a particle is virtual. The mass shells existence gives rise to many physical concepts, like the off-shellness of virtual particles, which suggests that photons can actually have a third polarization while propagating and weird things like that. It basically describes a whole lot of cool things, packed into a nice equation. Like Fgner said, it's not just it's great importance, it's also probably about the elegance in its simplicity.
#5493 to #5492 - Fgner ONLINE
Reply +2
(06/02/2016) [-]
It's well known because it's an incredibly simple equation (therefore easy for layman to remember) that had a profound impact on how we look at the world. Well, to be more accurate, the entire theories of general and special relativity did. So it's no so much that E=mc^2 has importance in of itself (though it does), it's just the easiest part to remember of one of the greatest physics breakthroughs of the century.
#5489 - yatush
Reply +1
(06/01/2016) [-]
So last summer i've been on a trip to Kamchatka, Russia. I had a trek by feet around the Tolbachik mountain, and was accompanied by a biologist and two geologists. We have found these, and I would like to ask one of you if you've got any idea what kind of Ionic compounds would be giving them this color.

thanks in advance.

If you have any cool questions about the trip, i'd love to answer them.
#5682 to #5489 - totalnotito
Reply 0
(08/26/2016) [-]
Could just be colonies of bio-luminescent bacteria
#5501 to #5489 - polarbare
Reply 0
(06/03/2016) [-]
are they solid? I'm not a geologist so I doubt I'll have much useful input, but the colour reminds me of the GFP bacteria we grow in our labs. Perhaps colonies of sulfer-bacteria?
#5497 to #5489 - zonetransferrer
Reply 0
(06/02/2016) [-]
Fe3+ maybe?
#5498 to #5497 - yatush
Reply 0
(06/02/2016) [-]
We speculated a little bit about them being radioactive, because they were giving out a glow. Though some of the with the red-ish color might be colored like that because of Fe ions, thanks.
#5499 to #5498 - zonetransferrer
Reply +1
(06/02/2016) [-]
you should use UV ligh on them and see if they emit more light
#5500 to #5499 - yatush
Reply 0
(06/02/2016) [-]
There is only one problem, they don't exist anymore, and their remains are 8900 km away
#5491 to #5489 - yatush
Reply +1
(06/01/2016) [-]
#5494 to #5491 - Fgner ONLINE
Reply 0
(06/02/2016) [-]
Damn, I wish i knew what they are, they look amazing! At first I thought I was looking at a bunch of fluorescent candles.
#5495 to #5494 - yatush
Reply +1
(06/02/2016) [-]
Yeah! After we've found these in a volcanic cave (which was in the middle of a still sort of hot lava lake, we basicly could see some red inbetween the cracks and that cave was fucking hot) we've reported these back to our friend's geologist office in Kamchatka, and it really blew up, many scientists went there to explore the fenomena, because these lasted only about a month after we found them.

the credit went to the biologist in our group, because she was the one who reported it, which is a little bit of a dick move, but our friend didn't care about it. Here is a pic of our friend's dog chasing a bear, because russia.
#5490 to #5489 - yatush
Reply +1
(06/01/2016) [-]
#5496 to #5490 - yatush
Reply 0
(06/02/2016) [-]
#5475 - mariopimpjr
Reply 0
(05/27/2016) [-]
what kind of things do scientists use to make negative energy? all i could find was laser beams passing through nonlinear optical materials or two uncharged parallel metal plates. cant find any other info than that. not even what or how they did or what machines they used
#5476 to #5475 - Fgner ONLINE
Reply 0
(05/27/2016) [-]
At that level of research, all the machines you'd find would be custom developed proprietary tech.

Enjoy the reading, though:
* en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negative_energy#Quantum_field_effects
* en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casimir_effect
* en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squeezed_coherent_state
* en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawking_radiation
#5477 to #5476 - mariopimpjr
Reply 0
(05/28/2016) [-]
so know any articles where they tell what kinds of machines?
#5478 to #5477 - Fgner ONLINE
Reply 0
(05/28/2016) [-]
Seeing as there are probably 4 or 5 of them that exist in the entire world, " all the machines you'd find would be custom developed proprietary tech."
#5479 to #5478 - mariopimpjr
Reply 0
(05/28/2016) [-]
idk what that means
#5480 to #5479 - Fgner ONLINE
Reply 0
(05/28/2016) [-]
If you can't understand that much, why are you looking into completely theoretical physics that require some of the brightest minds humanity have to offer for even a chance to discover? What I mean is that the field is theoretical, there aren't any names or brands for the machines they use - they are made by the labs, for the labs, and no one else in the world has a similar device.
#5481 to #5480 - mariopimpjr
Reply 0
(05/28/2016) [-]
so no one ever talked about how they found the results and put it online? like how they found those tiny worm holes that collapse so quickly?
#5483 to #5481 - Fgner ONLINE
Reply 0
(05/28/2016) [-]
#5482 to #5481 - Fgner ONLINE
Reply 0
(05/28/2016) [-]
Those wiki pages have citations, explore them. Some are behind research walls (you need uni access), but some are openly available. However, those "results" are 10-100 page documents describing the mathematics and physics behind the hypothesis, the testing method (which will describe what the machine does, but virtually nothing about how it does it), analysis of the results, and summation of hypothesis testing. There is absolutely no effort for them to make these materials available for layman, as every aspect about it is incomprehensible without extensive education and they've barely started research in the field.
#5484 to #5482 - mariopimpjr
Reply 0
(05/28/2016) [-]
until you get to the 1 in a million odds that a layman figures it out
#5485 to #5484 - Fgner ONLINE
Reply 0
(05/28/2016) [-]
Except the very definition of a layman: "a person without professional or specialized knowledge in a particular subject." It is, by definition, impossible for them to understand a specialist paper int he field that assumes enormous amounts of existing knowledge.

This isn't chem 101, this is enormously complicated, there's a reason we still know very little to nothing about all this stuff.
#5474 - mariopimpjr
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#5473 - zonetransferrer
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has deleted their comment [-]
#5471 - itsjustabaitbro
Reply +2
(05/18/2016) [-]
Wow guys, I learned that if you put a mentos candy in a soda bottle, it'll explode
It's so cool, you guys should try it
#5524 to #5471 - zonetransferrer
Reply 0
(06/10/2016) [-]
and if you smash those tablets into powdder, you will get faster reaction ;)
#5486 to #5471 - Fgner ONLINE
Reply 0
(05/29/2016) [-]
I learned how to make candy with bleach and ammonia once!
#5472 to #5471 - thatshadyguy
Reply 0
(05/18/2016) [-]
**thatshadyguy used "*roll 1, rpg name*"**
**thatshadyguy rolls Krywood**

Fire hydrant jew penicilin.
#5470 - mariopimpjr
Reply 0
(05/18/2016) [-]
what are some crystalline quartz?
#5487 to #5470 - lukerstein ONLINE
Reply 0
(05/29/2016) [-]
if you have a handfull of sand, then you have some crystalline quartz
#5488 to #5487 - mariopimpjr
Reply 0
(05/29/2016) [-]
One that's pretty put together, I wanted a good one
#5469 - mariopimpjr
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has deleted their comment [-]
#5467 - thailin
Reply 0
(05/17/2016) [-]
Anyone got the picture of Hitler looking at a pair of boobs, while he doesn't seem to care?
Will give thump, need it for science
#5457 - sideismss
Reply 0
(05/12/2016) [-]
how do scientists know the percentage of undiscovered species? like, if they are undiscovered, how do they know it exists?
#5458 to #5457 - bemymaster
Reply +2
(05/13/2016) [-]
They don't know. It's a great mystery really and the number has changed several times over the years, but i guess the best method they have is to make estimates based on the biodiversity of a set region, then add that numbers of species along with the estimates of other regions. New estimates from Indiana University researchers say there's 1 trillion species, where 99.999% are undiscovered.
news.indiana.edu/releases/iu/2016/05/microorganism-study.shtml
#5456 - waffenmia
Reply 0
(05/10/2016) [-]
quick question, in hydraulics. If i want power lost. do i use HA(12) or H lost( the one i got for a)
#5455 - waffenmia
0
has deleted their comment [-]
#5454 - whitechino
Reply 0
(05/10/2016) [-]
Was anybody able to see Jupiter in front of the Sun?
Were we even able to see a little dot in all that light?
#5463 to #5454 - platinumaltaria
Reply 0
(05/17/2016) [-]
From the perspective of Earth Jupiter does not pass in front of the sun.
#5453 - mariopimpjr
Reply 0
(05/04/2016) [-]
is it true that milk doesnt do anything for you health wise and you can forget about it? adam ruins everything said milk doesnt really matter and you can just get calcium from other things and that the milk companies just said it was good for you
#5502 to #5453 - polarbare
Reply 0
(06/03/2016) [-]
one of the main benefits of milk for infants is that it contains glycoproteins which are very similar to human milk glycoproteins, these help in the developing gut bacterial flora and help with immunity
#5459 to #5453 - soundofwinter
Reply +1
(05/13/2016) [-]
I did a project about it for an anthropology class and the ability to drink milk is the most selected for trait in the human genome.

Here's the "benefits of drinking" milk slide I had for the project

"Very strongly selected for trait, it’s been estimated that people with LP will produce 19% more offspring than those without it. One of the most strongly selected for genes that are present in our genome.
High Vitamin D content in milk is helpful in Northern Regions.
A source of clean “drinking water”
Supplements food supplies in times of crop failure or famine
Good source of Calcium, Protein, Vitamin A/B, and Potassium
Good for skin
Reduces symptoms of PMS
Lowers high blood pressure, lowers risk of stroke, and reduces liver's production of cholesterol
Lowers risk of certain cancers (Breast, Colon, and possibly Ovarian) "

Can give sources if you want
#5460 to #5459 - mariopimpjr
Reply 0
(05/13/2016) [-]
so adam is wrong that "we dont really need it"?
#5462 to #5460 - zonetransferrer
Reply 0
(05/14/2016) [-]
we dont need it but why bother eating 1000 things to get supplements for what we can get from one thing?
#5461 to #5460 - soundofwinter
Reply 0
(05/13/2016) [-]
We don't NEED it, but it's great for us
#5447 - bonglio
Reply 0
(05/01/2016) [-]
whats this bug
#5465 to #5447 - brownskin ONLINE
Reply 0
(05/17/2016) [-]
Maybe a Wolf Spider. Pretty much harmless. Build cool ass funnel webs tho
#5466 to #5465 - bonglio
Reply 0
(05/17/2016) [-]
ew it was on my leg
its dead now. thnx though
#5449 to #5447 - Fgner ONLINE
Reply +1
(05/01/2016) [-]
Evil.
#5451 to #5449 - bonglio
Reply 0
(05/01/2016) [-]
why are these spiders haunting my life
#5452 to #5451 - Fgner ONLINE
Reply 0
(05/01/2016) [-]
Karma getting you back for messin' with the boobs.
#5450 to #5449 - bonglio
Reply 0
(05/01/2016) [-]