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#164 - anon
Reply 0
(10/30/2013) [-]
The cityscape is too bright, it would be much darker than that.
Go to a remote forest and find out just how dark it gets, despite all the stars.
The high buildings in those cities will have a similar effect on ground level.

And all the people talking about crime rates, funny how that works in places where there isn't many lights in night time. Crime rates are lower but that may be because people are less mentally ****** in those places as well.
#119 - sanditroll
Reply 0
(10/17/2013) [-]
I see many people arguing that seeing this kind of sky is impossible, or it's just a camera with long exposure.
Both of these are untrue, you can see this sky but not everyday, there are better days than others when you can see the galaxy and not at any time since the moon is also a light source in the night sky it will make your eyes adjust to a higher light level. The eyes need atleast 15-20 minutes to readjust their "night vision". So if you want to see this kind of sky you shouldn't have any light source in your field of view.There are instructions if you look them up when it's best to view the milky way.

This is clearly not a long exposure picture because that would make the stars into lines since the earth is moving and even a little longer exposure would smudge the sky.
#24 - commontroll
Reply 0
(10/17/2013) [-]
There's never anything for Houston...

Guess I'll just have to imagine.
#27 to #24 - nervaaurelius
Reply 0
(10/17/2013) [-]
Just drive outside of the city. We have a huge amount of countryside.
#28 to #27 - commontroll
Reply 0
(10/17/2013) [-]
And still a lot of light pollution (though not as bad as other places) plus, it'd be cool to see what it'd be like with the buildings of downtown.
#29 to #28 - nervaaurelius
Reply 0
(10/17/2013) [-]
Yeah that's true if you go out to west texas though you won't have any light pollution though depending on where you are.
#23 - riverofchex
Reply 0
(10/17/2013) [-]
...Maybe if you were looking through a friggin telescope.