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#124 - fivefingerlaugh
Reply +4
(11/27/2012) [-]
**fivefingerlaugh rolled a random image posted in comment #152 at Amazing **
#145 to #124 - dtcrawl
Reply +1
(11/27/2012) [-]
#123 - lemonsixx
Reply -9
(11/27/2012) [-]
so... she wants to see just oxygen?
#139 to #123 - mackigol
Reply 0
(11/27/2012) [-]
That would be dehydrogenation.
#127 to #123 - Wasausky
Reply -2
(11/27/2012) [-]
Oxygen = dried water.
Yes.
#135 to #127 - mooghens
Reply +1
(11/27/2012) [-]
Oxygen is an atom.
You evaporate a liquid it's got the same chemical formula as before.
When you talk about dehydration (specifically the type she is referring to i.e ala. dried milk) you are talking about the literal lack of water molecules. H2O.
#118 - HarvietheDinkle
Reply 0
(11/27/2012) [-]
The only way this could be possible if you're assuming there are impurities in the water.
#116 - fistymcbeefpunch
Reply +7
(11/27/2012) [-]
Here ya go
#114 - contradiction
Reply +1
(11/27/2012) [-]
she has an idea that she cant put into words...and when she tried it sounded ******* stupid.
#111 - ehrcaduhrca
Reply +1
(11/26/2012) [-]
Isn't lime dry water?
#113 to #111 - HarvietheDinkle
Reply +2
(11/27/2012) [-]
It's only possible because it's more than just H20.
#110 - Cyraxx
Reply +26
(11/26/2012) [-]
This may sound insane

but I want to see dehydrated water
#106 - pilotdudeman
Reply +12
(11/26/2012) [-]
........Ultimately speaking....she's been seeing dehydrated water her entire life. H2O minus the hydrogen is just Oxygen....technically speaking...she's breathing dehydrated water o.o
#130 to #106 - mooghens
Reply +4
(11/27/2012) [-]
FJ is apparently stupider than i thought.
Dehydration has nothing to do with the atoms water consists of.
Dehydration is a term for removing H20 molecules in a solution or physical body (i.e food drying for instance, as with milk)


#194 to #130 - pilotdudeman
Reply -2
(11/27/2012) [-]
Well, water just isnt water without the hydrogen molecule. It's what makes it moist and give its ability to flow...
#198 to #194 - mooghens
Reply 0
(11/27/2012) [-]
Mercury flows. Mercury is a single element that's liquid at room temperature and doesn't contain hydrogen.  All chemical compounds can are liquid at the right temperatures.   
   
Read a basic chemistry book and stop spouting ********
Mercury flows. Mercury is a single element that's liquid at room temperature and doesn't contain hydrogen. All chemical compounds can are liquid at the right temperatures.

Read a basic chemistry book and stop spouting ********

#193 to #130 - pilotdudeman
0
has deleted their comment [-]
#186 to #130 - iamscifer
Reply +1
(11/27/2012) [-]
finally somebody that's not a complete retard
#121 to #106 - Gamerboyforlife **User deleted account**
-2
has deleted their comment [-]
#126 to #121 - anon
Reply 0
(11/27/2012) [-]
rin
#129 to #126 - Gamerboyforlife **User deleted account**
0
has deleted their comment [-]
#112 to #106 - cheatmasterjunk
Reply +3
(11/27/2012) [-]
I think (think) dehydrated water means water, without the water.

Water without the hydrogen, which you're right in saying would be oxygen, could be called dehydrogenated water.

itookoneclassinhighschool.mp4
#115 to #112 - HarvietheDinkle
Reply +2
(11/27/2012) [-]
byneptune.mosaic
#117 to #115 - cheatmasterjunk
Reply 0
(11/27/2012) [-]
wegotafiletypebadassoverhere.jar
#119 to #117 - HarvietheDinkle
Reply +1
(11/27/2012) [-]
source
#109 to #106 - danytheop
Reply +1
(11/26/2012) [-]
i love that movie.
#97 - fingercramp
Reply +33
(11/26/2012) [-]
Just leave this here
#163 to #97 - bookyle
Reply 0
(11/27/2012) [-]
I think this might just be some powder that kills bacterias in the water
#92 - confusedasian
Reply +8
(11/26/2012) [-]
Comment Picture
#90 - happyPills
Reply +18
(11/26/2012) [-]
dehydrated water. de-hydrate-d water. hydrate = water.
remove water and its synonym from the the sentence and you get
I want to see the D.
#101 to #90 - mooghens
Reply +3
(11/26/2012) [-]
#89 - redclover ONLINE
Reply 0
(11/26/2012) [-]
As a joke at work we tell new people to grab dehydrated water out the back.
The goal is to see whether they notice that such a thing doesn't exist, or how long it takes them to come back front and ask for help.
#83 - kdarr
Reply +10
(11/26/2012) [-]
#134 to #83 - pukingrainbows
Reply +3
(11/27/2012) [-]
Whoever made that is lazy. Here's a touched up version.
#197 to #134 - kdarr
Reply 0
(11/27/2012) [-]
Thanks man i just found the one i have on a jimmies post, thumb for you bro :D
#80 - kightofnever
Reply +1
(11/26/2012) [-]
blond invention

water activated water
#79 - Flaminghomosapien ONLINE
Reply +2
(11/26/2012) [-]
everyone is like "oh yh thats ******* easy, look at me do science". wtf. think about it. how the **** can u have deHYDRATED water. seriously.
#76 - trolljunkusa
Reply -1
(11/26/2012) [-]
>dry ice
#77 to #76 - radiomix
Reply +2
(11/26/2012) [-]
I can't even. That's carbon dioxide.
#78 to #77 - trolljunkusa
Reply -1
(11/26/2012) [-]
It doesn't have hydrogen in it

*Boom* chemistry
#81 to #78 - radiomix
Reply 0
(11/26/2012) [-]
What? I know that, and if you knew that, why did you even say it?
#82 to #81 - trolljunkusa
Reply 0
(11/26/2012) [-]
you've probably heard more useless things in your life. Nothing to make a big deal over
#73 - keyoke
Reply -1
(11/26/2012) [-]
It's not only possible, it is ******* easy.
Take a ******** (standard scientific measurement unit) of water, and boil it until it is gone. Then you shall receive dehydrated water.

In it's dehydrated form, it would most likely appear as a white powder, however
from tap or fresh water, you would need a great amount to actually see it.
Water, is not actually just H2O, in fact it is a very thin solution of many salts and minerals (depending on where it was acquired).


This fact is used to extract many useful compounds from seawater and brine.
Lithium (for your cell batteries) is "mined" almost exclusively this way, in a small american town. Table salt is also sometimes manufactured from seawater by spreading it in huge great fields, and waiting for the sun to dry it out.
#94 to #73 - anon
Reply 0
(11/26/2012) [-]
Dude, water is just water.
Run it through an RO/DI system to remove any impurities and you have have pure water.
Pure water when boiled will leave nothing behind, There's no such thing as "dehydrated water".
#87 to #73 - buttplugmaster
Reply +1
(11/26/2012) [-]
No. Water is the compound H2O. Everything else in water is just minerals and electrolytes and stuff in water. There are three states of matter, solid, liquid, and gas. White powders or powders in general are solid. Water's solid form is ice. There is no white powder that is dehydrated water as water can't be a solid at room temperature for extended period of time.
#95 to #87 - keyoke
Reply -1
(11/26/2012) [-]
Water, as found in nature, is always a solution. As H2O is removed from this solution, the electrolytes stay behind. If you add the H2O back, you will regain your solution.

Why are you speaking of ice? The white powder is not ice, but salts, like NaCl or KCl and others. If you wish it, I will dig up my water quality lab journals from Enviromental chemistry and PM you the ICP-MS results to show you the contents of water.
#100 to #95 - buttplugmaster
Reply 0
(11/26/2012) [-]
If you acknowledge the white powder isn't water, then what is the point of your argument? Water is a compound. Despite the fact that in nature it is found in solution, the solutes are not water and removing the water and being left with the solutes does not make dehydrated water.
#102 to #100 - keyoke
Reply -1
(11/26/2012) [-]
My point is that ultrapure water, is not water, as we know it.
Have you ever tasted the stuff that comes out of a Millipore?
It is flat, and noticeably less awesome than tap water.
It lacks the solutes in question, not to mention a lot of gas, like oxygen and nitrogen.
The white powder is not water, but neither is dehydrated milk, milk.
They both lack H2O.
#104 to #102 - buttplugmaster
Reply 0
(11/26/2012) [-]
But no one spoke about dehydrating water into its solutes. You're going into semantics, as it's fairly obvious that the discussion at hand would be about water itself and not about the solutes normally found in water because water is rarely pure. And with that, I bid you good day.
#105 to #104 - buttplugmaster
Reply 0
(11/26/2012) [-]
Comment Picture
#96 to #95 - keyoke
Reply -1
(11/26/2012) [-]
If you manage to find me some 99.9999% Water, I will be very impressed :D
#103 to #96 - tonlynx
Reply +1
(11/26/2012) [-]
Litterally EVERY lab in the world have this. Demineralized water, anyone?
#107 to #103 - keyoke
Reply -1
(11/26/2012) [-]
My bad, I didn't actually check my figures, and assumed that beyond .999 % was out of the reach of the standard purifyers. It turns out that Analysis Type 1 water is acutally 99.99999 % pure. However, not even Millipore makes it more pure than that (not that there is ANY reason to to so).
#93 to #87 - mechanichore
Reply +1
(11/26/2012) [-]
Thanks I didn't wanna have to type all that out lol
#75 to #73 - sinonyx
0
has deleted their comment [-]
#70 - HerpidyDerp
Reply +5
(11/26/2012) [-]
#68 - ruzzell
Reply -1
(11/26/2012) [-]
We see and breath dehydrated water everyday, it's called oxygen.
#98 to #68 - mooghens
Reply -1
(11/26/2012) [-]
Comment Picture
#72 to #68 - keyoke
Reply 0
(11/26/2012) [-]
This is wrong on so many levels...
Read a chemistry book...
#69 to #68 - pariahlol
Reply +1
(11/26/2012) [-]
what you did there, I saw
#67 - qwermy
Reply +3
(11/26/2012) [-]
ALCOHOL-FREE VODKA