yes...YES...YEEESSSS!. .. the thing is, I wonder if they account for the pulsars moving? I mean, the universe doesn't remained fixed, and it will get a harder to triangulate your positio
x

Comments(97):

[ 97 comments ]
What do you think? Give us your opinion. Anonymous comments allowed.
#18 - anon (05/05/2013) [-]
"turn left in 42478924789432789 meters"
User avatar #38 to #18 - pseudobob **User deleted account** (05/06/2013) [-]
There are no left turns in space.
#57 to #38 - anon (05/06/2013) [-]
Sure there are, All your ship needs to do is be an actual identifiable lateral shape. Then all you have to do is turn 180 degrees in the left direction from the pilot's vantage point, because circles till exist in space.
PAYING ATTENTION IN GEOMETRY PAYS OFF.
User avatar #66 to #57 - pseudobob **User deleted account** (05/06/2013) [-]
I mean there isn't a point to left turns in order to get to your destination. All space travel can be achieved in a straight line. Even if something needs to be avoided, you can just strafe out of the way and keep going without ever turning.

As far as geometry goes, left and right are subjective directions and don't work well on waterships, let alone on spaceships (you know, theoretically). Until personal spacecraft are feasible, all directions should use cardinal or naval distinction. Even after they exist and self-reference is no longer an issue, right and left would still be inconvenient for different reasons.
User avatar #22 to #18 - thunderkrux (05/05/2013) [-]
**** ...... I missed the turn
#109 to #22 - anon (12/21/2013) [-]
hay dude just chill..u might miss that turn here here is very funny flick u may like it
www.nthwall.com/te/videochannel/Hot-Girl-Attempts-To-Pole-Dance-Its-So-Funny/2155
User avatar #8 - ihaveakeyboard (05/05/2013) [-]
the thing is, I wonder if they account for the pulsars moving? I mean, the universe doesn't remained fixed, and it will get a ******** harder to triangulate your position when your reference points are sliding around
#67 to #8 - drshkidz (05/06/2013) [-]
"I wonder if they account for the pulsars moving?"
No, when dealing with relativity, scientists certainly don't consider things moving.
The GPS we have now is already heavily accounting for movement on a level too tiny for most people to comprehend, let alone work with.
I'm almost certain that not only are they accounting for it, it's a major factor as to why the pciture says "working on" and not "implemented already and I mean, it wasn't even that hard guys"
#99 to #67 - kingpongthedon (05/06/2013) [-]
Nope, they just found pulsars that are moving so slow, they can be approximated as static. You gotta remember, they're so far away, we can barely perceive their movement. It won't affect a triangulation system at all.
#103 to #99 - drshkidz (05/06/2013) [-]
I feel like that puts an operational limit on range, lifetime and accuracy and in no way recognize the validity of settling for a design that merely works "pretty damn well all things considered" in favor of "provably accurate to the nearest planck length."
Go figure. Lazy goddamn astrophysicists.
#104 to #103 - kingpongthedon (05/06/2013) [-]
It does, but you gotta think of it as an engineer and not a scientist. Engineers are all about taking the easy way out. And frankly, there's just no need to design a system that accurate. Once you're within a km of something, you're probably already using detection devices, like old-fashioned cameras, to do your navigating. And we've only produced one object that has left the solar system. It will be hundreds, if not thousands of years before that kind of system needs to be implemented. Right now, we just don't have the need or technology to implement a dynamic system.
#107 to #104 - drshkidz (05/06/2013) [-]
Well, no I got that, I pretty much cotton'd on to it once you pointed out they had just gone ahead and scraped by, then I put it together with the five klick maximum deviation that they had just settled for something workable in a first generation system.
But wonderful clarification anyways. It's kind of easy to forget we haven't really gotten much under our belt in the way of even system-wide travel, y'know? I'm just worried that my grandchildren's grandchildren's etc might end up in some gas giant from using bootleg 21st century positioning algorithms.
#98 to #8 - kingpongthedon (05/06/2013) [-]
As of now they don't. Currently, it's too difficult to precisely measure the speed of the pulsars. It's unnecessary too, they're just so far away that even though they're moving thousands of miles an hour, they're relatively fixed points in the sky. Anything we'll be doing anytime soon will most likely use a static model, as it's just too much work to accurately produce a dynamic model. Right now, they seem to have limited themselves to using pulsars that can be approximated as static. In the far distant future, they'll have to use a dynamic model, but the current "static" model is accurate up to 1 km anywhere in the solar system, which is more than sufficient for anything we'll ever use it for.

Here's a link to the paper if you're interested: You need to login to view this link
User avatar #9 to #8 - longbowgun (05/05/2013) [-]
This system depends on a working 3d model of the galaxy. Any model of this nature has to include movement.
#10 to #9 - ihaveakeyboard (05/05/2013) [-]
that is going to be hard as 			****		 to program... damn good of them then.   
			****		, hat is just that much more awesome   
   
.gif random, but kinda related
that is going to be hard as **** to program... damn good of them then.
**** , hat is just that much more awesome

.gif random, but kinda related
User avatar #11 to #10 - longbowgun (05/05/2013) [-]
Not if the only thing you're tracking is pulsars. There aren't that many that the model would have to track. Your pic relates: The system would not have to track all objects. But, it would be helpful so that you don't run into stuff. The speeds required for travel (even within the solar system) could make any collision deadly. You need to login to view this link
#48 to #10 - beerholder (05/06/2013) [-]
I've been looking for this gif for ages. Kind thanks good sir!
#100 to #9 - kingpongthedon (05/06/2013) [-]
It doesn't account for motion, they just found pulsars that are moving so slow, they can be approximated as static. They're just so far away that any motion they may have has no practical effect on their apparent location.
#3 - Lambda (05/05/2013) [-]
#84 to #69 - Lambda (05/06/2013) [-]
This is now a Star Trek captains thread. But we don't really have any good ones left, do we?
User avatar #41 - abstract (05/06/2013) [-]
Use it on NASA's future warp drive spacecraft

io9.com/5963263/how-nasa-will-build-its-very-first-warp-drive
#43 to #41 - katsikis (05/06/2013) [-]
**katsikis rolled a random image posted in comment #4252668 at My Little Pony fanfiction, backgrounds, songs, lyrics, and GIFs. ** whoa
**katsikis rolled a random image posted in comment #4252668 at My Little Pony fanfiction, backgrounds, songs, lyrics, and GIFs. ** whoa
User avatar #54 to #41 - guiguito (05/06/2013) [-]
OH GOD YESSSSSSSSSS
User avatar #72 to #41 - HordeyWordey (05/06/2013) [-]
Damn, *****
User avatar #81 to #41 - pedobearRAW (05/06/2013) [-]
i love science
#102 to #41 - anon (05/06/2013) [-]
That model would be really neat, except energy to bend space in front of the craft would have to move at greater then light speeds in a local frame to continuously be ahead of the craft, therefore making this very implausible
#7 - hackapelite ONLINE (05/05/2013) [-]
Comment Picture
User avatar #74 - mrgoodlove (05/06/2013) [-]
Cool, now anytime I'm traveling in space I wont get lost
#20 - ukuleleofvengeance (05/05/2013) [-]
op
op
#5 - blacktothefuture (05/05/2013) [-]
Awww yea, one step closer.
#14 to #5 - motherfuckingkenji (05/05/2013) [-]
I don't understand this reference.
I don't understand this reference.
User avatar #16 to #14 - wakazooie ONLINE (05/05/2013) [-]
new star trek movie?
User avatar #21 to #16 - motherfuckingkenji (05/05/2013) [-]
Ah, that makes sense, thank you.
I haven't even seen a trailer for it, so...
User avatar #88 - piab (05/06/2013) [-]
Is it voiced by Morgan Freeman?
User avatar #37 - blademontane ONLINE (05/06/2013) [-]
Now all we need is an actual interstellar spaceship for this to be useful. Kinda like owning an Xbox game without an Xbox
User avatar #53 to #37 - Ryukenblaze (05/06/2013) [-]
but an interstellar spacecraft without one would be kind of pointless
User avatar #71 - colegaleener (05/06/2013) [-]
sounds pointless
User avatar #86 to #71 - dracory ONLINE (05/06/2013) [-]
look at it in the long run this might allow us to travel outside our solar system and still keep track of how to get home
#68 - Thenewguygunther (05/06/2013) [-]
man it would suck to miss your exit with this


damn space cornfields
#95 - DannyDanger (05/06/2013) [-]
and here he have a picture of the USS Enterprise from Star Trek
User avatar #83 - HOLYCARP (05/06/2013) [-]
WE ALSO HAVE LEGIT LAZERS. BURN HOLES THROUGH STEEL AT 300M. Weeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee ee. Whos excited for interstellar space travel? I AM.
User avatar #91 to #83 - waffies (05/06/2013) [-]
well the interstellar part is what we're missing!!!
User avatar #106 to #91 - HOLYCARP (05/06/2013) [-]
THATS WHERE WE'RE HEADED AS A SPECIES. prolly wont be til.. 2100~ tho. OWELL STIL EXCITED.
User avatar #56 - pepemex (05/06/2013) [-]
But nothing in space is still, so how can you calculate where it is?
#61 to #56 - anon (05/06/2013) [-]
compensation
User avatar #55 - derpyhuman (05/06/2013) [-]
I guess it'd be a UPS.
User avatar #58 to #55 - masterspectre (05/06/2013) [-]
No, GPS would still work. Galactic Positioning System.
#62 to #58 - anon (05/06/2013) [-]
galactic postal service
User avatar #60 to #58 - derpyhuman (05/06/2013) [-]
Galactic would only be in a Galaxy though. Maybe Trans/Intergalactic Positioning System would work.
User avatar #46 - kyloking (05/06/2013) [-]
Wouldn't it be called UPS, universal positioning system?
User avatar #51 to #46 - Ryukenblaze (05/06/2013) [-]
well yeah..but UPS would sue..
User avatar #64 to #51 - thedarkestrogue (05/06/2013) [-]
or they could call it the Spacial Positioning System.
User avatar #42 - Accidentalninja (05/06/2013) [-]
Doesn't matter if we don't have photon torpedoes
[ 97 comments ]
Leave a comment
 Friends (0)