science. science stuff.
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Comments(104):

[ 104 comments ]
What do you think? Give us your opinion. Anonymous comments allowed.
#4 - JFINE (02/09/2013) [-]
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#19 - babyweewee (02/10/2013) [-]
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#18 - snaketail (02/10/2013) [-]
Do you?
User avatar #59 to #18 - jubnik (02/10/2013) [-]
the lift on the bottom seems unessassary
User avatar #1 - grpeephole (02/09/2013) [-]
now i know how to make a powerderless gun :3
User avatar #5 to #1 - dennisc (02/09/2013) [-]
http://scitoys.com/scitoys/scitoys/magnets/gauss.html

Don't think it will actually do much damage as a gun though, even if you make it long enough.
#28 to #5 - heisenberg (02/10/2013) [-]
This one will
http:// www.instructables. com/id/Make-poweful-a-green-railgun/
User avatar #6 - domethius (02/10/2013) [-]
Apparently, it lifts.
#62 - onezeroeight (02/10/2013) [-]
Do you even?
#61 - krayon (02/10/2013) [-]
This image has expired
#48 - powerfapping (02/10/2013) [-]
Correct me if I'm wrong, but is this just a demonstration using magnets to illustrate the conservation of momentum?
#53 to #48 - jaedi (02/10/2013) [-]
Check out the change in velocity between the incoming ball and the outgoing ball. A little bit more than conservation is at work here.
#54 to #53 - powerfapping (02/10/2013) [-]
Well look at the magnet before the ball impacts it. It accelerates towards the ball at a high speed, which in turn fires off the end ball because of the conservation of momentum.
#55 to #54 - jaedi (02/10/2013) [-]
This is true, but the ball at the end leaves with a greater speed than the input ball had, even if you include the magnetic attraction that the ball felt when it accelerated to start the chain, the leaving ball felt the same attraction as it left and still left faster.
#56 to #55 - powerfapping (02/10/2013) [-]
The key here is to look at each collision as a separate part of the system. Momentum is conserved between each individual collision. The first ball strikes the magnet and in order to conserve momentum, the end ball is fired off. Then that ball becomes the first ball and strikes the second magnet and so on. However, each ball which gets fired off has a higher initial velocity which means a greater force is enacted on the end ball to conserve momentum. Momentum is conserved in each collision even though the system gains momentum as a whole.
#57 to #56 - jaedi (02/10/2013) [-]
I feel like my physics teacher would be a little irritated with me because I mixed up kinetic energy and momentum, and so I guess the 'magic' of the increasing ball speed comes from the fact that all of the sets of magnets move backwards as it shoots along, deceptively adding up to quite a bit of momentum for the single shot.
#47 - skyrmix (02/10/2013) [-]
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#27 - ikza (02/10/2013) [-]
Do these balls even lift?   
   
   
   
Yes   
   
   
Yes they do.
Do these balls even lift?



Yes


Yes they do.
User avatar #37 to #27 - bigbeaufort ONLINE (02/10/2013) [-]
they seem to pull a bit actually...
#46 - Formus (02/10/2013) [-]
damn u science!
#66 - mummyslittlebitch (02/10/2013) [-]
This 			****		 haz science also!
This **** haz science also!
User avatar #68 to #66 - givemecoke (02/10/2013) [-]
we hook this up to an engine, it powers the engine. infinite energy. we're gonna make billions.
User avatar #80 to #68 - vexaton ONLINE (02/10/2013) [-]
How would you make it rotate? You can't make infinite energy.
User avatar #92 to #80 - kousei (02/10/2013) [-]
The only way to get "infinite" energy is through a perpetual motion system. However perpetual motion typically doesn't move too fast so the amount of energy generated by the size of the machine would be miniscule.

To give you an idea (this is not accurate but a general comparison). To power your house would take a system as big as a city (extreme example but you get the idea)
User avatar #94 to #92 - vexaton ONLINE (02/10/2013) [-]
Yes but because of potential energy in an object, and heat exchange, friction and light reflection + gravity and other magnetic forces, energy is lost all the time. By light reflection, I mean light bouncing off of the object, making it move ever so slightly every time, and finally making it stop. This might take hundreds of years, but it's still there.

There's no such thing as perpetual motion. At least not on Earth
User avatar #101 to #94 - kousei (02/10/2013) [-]
Fair point. Even further decreasing the viability of a perpetual motion source of energy.

Though a counter for the inevitable stop may be a water system. Using water pressure to push water from a low point back up to a high point. Ignoring evaporation this may actually produce perpetual motion.

DISCLAIMER: I am not a physicist, this theory is amateur and i still doubt it would be a good source of infinite energy.
User avatar #102 to #101 - vexaton ONLINE (02/10/2013) [-]
The closest we can get to infinite energy is the sun... It will last for billions of years, and we can make solar panels very very big. That's the closest I think.

I'm no phycisist, nor an engineer. This is just stuff I've picked up over the years
User avatar #83 to #68 - toguro (02/10/2013) [-]
Unfortunately that wouldn't work. I had the same ideas as a kid but it's the simple fact that energy cannot be created or destroyed - you will only gain the same or less amount of energy than you put into it.
#69 - slenderwolf (02/10/2013) [-]
I'll just leave this right here.
I'll just leave this right here.
#112 to #69 - anon (02/15/2013) [-]
UR STILL SCARING ME T.T
User avatar #72 to #69 - pixelpixel (02/10/2013) [-]
what am i doing with my life ..
#113 to #63 - anon (02/15/2013) [-]
BEST GIF EVER
#25 - anon (02/10/2013) [-]
That can even does
#9 - mattcris (02/10/2013) [-]
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