perfect-physics. can this really be done, has science gone to far.. I tried to recreate and it didnt work. Also...got the paper airplane stuck in my pee hole. I'm currently on my way to the hospital. science went to far
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#6 - anon
Reply 0
(02/16/2013) [-]
wow totally fake. look at how slow the fans are going, ********. there probably wouldnt be any air at all.
#14 to #6 - masterbob
Reply 0
(02/16/2013) [-]
i hate you for this. i honestly do. you are at the top of my **** list.
#20 to #6 - semisane
Reply 0
(02/16/2013) [-]
#31 to #6 - drewsky
Reply 0
(02/16/2013) [-]
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#7 to #6 - juffs
Reply +2
(02/16/2013) [-]
I.... Please tell me you're not being serious.
#8 to #6 - warrenzthehero ONLINE
Reply +13
(02/16/2013) [-]
#19 to #8 - funnyrage
Reply 0
(02/16/2013) [-]
lets hope for the first one.
#3 - pompladouche
Reply +8
(02/15/2013) [-]
I tried to recreate and it didnt work. Also...got the paper airplane stuck in my pee hole. I'm currently on my way to the hospital.
#11 - renegadejack
Reply +4
(02/16/2013) [-]
here have another
here have another
#25 to #11 - pimpinpenguin
Reply +1
(02/16/2013) [-]
perpetual motion is possible
perpetual motion is possible
#26 to #25 - pimpinpenguin
Reply +1
(02/16/2013) [-]
and
and
#27 to #26 - pimpinpenguin
Reply +5
(02/16/2013) [-]
and
#35 to #25 - mrwalkerfour
Reply 0
(02/16/2013) [-]
thats not perpetual motion the fans are not sustaining themselves therefore a soon as they will eventually run out
#52 - zachloweth
Reply +4
(02/16/2013) [-]
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#21 - anonymoose
Reply +3
(02/16/2013) [-]
This can't be done. Look at the clouds below the left fan, there's a suspicious edge that makes the left fan look shopped in.
#23 to #21 - pocoyothegreat
Reply 0
(02/16/2013) [-]
#2 - johnpoppy
Reply +3
(02/15/2013) [-]
Damn it! Dave broke physics again.
#37 - throwspooatmonkeys
Reply +1
(02/16/2013) [-]
No. This kind of balance is nearly impossible to achieve. It may be possible with specialized equipment; position sensors, fans that employ cowling and other **** to make a laminar air flow, and a fast(ish) microcontroller working as a proportional/integral/derivative math machine, outputting signals to servos controlling cowling direction (2d) and fan speed. The original source of this video employed "invisible string", available at any magic shop.

~source~: I'm a god damned engineer.
#55 to #37 - laminar
Reply +1
(02/16/2013) [-]
tfw mentioned in a comment
#39 to #37 - oceanmist
Reply +2
(02/16/2013) [-]
Also as an engineer, I want to say you took this as complicated as it possibly needed to be. You could have just said that the drag would pull the plane to the left. Even all that equipment wouldn't stop the drag. The best engineers are always the laziest when it comes to solving problems.
#42 to #39 - throwspooatmonkeys
Reply +1
(02/16/2013) [-]
OK... OK... I'll admit it. I'm an EE, but I still know a thing or two about fluid dynamics (I has dead millwright father). You're totally in line by slapping me in the face with Occam's razor. I know I could have put my statement more simply; stuff like the original post creates not only a vacuum for my faith in human intelligence, but also my will to finish this messa......


There's a lot of us engineer folk here. S'weird...
#44 to #42 - oceanmist
Reply +1
(02/16/2013) [-]
All the good engineers are on the Internet, cause they're lazy. Also, to be fair, I failed dynamics and changed to Computer science so I didn't have to take it. I really hate math without numbers.
#45 to #44 - throwspooatmonkeys
Reply 0
(02/16/2013) [-]
It's friday, night here, so I'm allowed to be on the net, as I don't have to work in the AM. Just so ya know, fluid dynamics has a great deal of math at it's disposal to solve problems. If you've ever seen the Greek lambda symbol in an unfamiliar equation, but upside down, then.... yeah... I suck at language.

It's called vector calculus. No big whoop.
#40 to #39 - dkolega
Reply 0
(02/16/2013) [-]
you just need to tie the damn thing to the right fan

i might be an engineer in a few years
#41 to #40 - oceanmist
Reply +1
(02/16/2013) [-]
Yup. Do it fast, cheap, and with no effort and NASA will be calling
#46 to #41 - throwspooatmonkeys
Reply 0
(02/16/2013) [-]
It really wouldn't be that hard! If you know what laminar flow is and how to create it, how to direct airflow with any of the standard NACA (no, I didn't misspell that) and if you can properly implement a PID controller for this purpose, I don't see why it couldn't happen. Of course, the rig would probably have quite a few more fans, and be in an enclosure, but whatever... Anything is possible, right?

#48 to #46 - dkolega
Reply 0
(02/16/2013) [-]
dude, just tie the damn thing to the top of the right fan and it's all done
#51 to #48 - throwspooatmonkeys
Reply 0
(02/16/2013) [-]
Hmmm.... If you can design a paper plane with a single 11*8.5" sheet of paper with a single 1.5' string that will remain stable behind a fan like the the ones we saw in the gif, the I, sir, will bake a cookie in your honor, and spend no less than 4 hours creating OC dedicated to you, to be posted on FJ. I will also mail you the cookie (US or CA only)
#47 to #46 - throwspooatmonkeys
Reply 0
(02/16/2013) [-]
For the record, AC and RC jets on all space fairing rockets and most military equipment employ PID systems, so it's nothing new. In fact, PID controlled items are almost everywhere, from expensive vacuums, to... whatever... I'm tired of this ****.

#50 to #40 - throwspooatmonkeys
Reply 0
(02/16/2013) [-]
Good for you? What discipline?

I know many people that went to "engineering school" for YEARS before they found out it had nothing to do with trains.

WOOO WOOOOOOO!!!!!! (chuga chuga chuga chuga chuga chuga) WOOOO WOOOOO!!!!!
#43 to #40 - throwspooatmonkeys
Reply 0
(02/16/2013) [-]
You would also need to tie it to the left fan, or some other object perpendicular to or to the left of the normal axis. Try it if you need to. If you just tie it to the right fan, the plan would go all floopity-floppity and crash out of the air flow.
#32 - doddythechef
Reply +2
(02/16/2013) [-]
if this were to happen the plane would drop due to gravity as neither fan is causing up draft to lift the plane. the two fans would cancel eachother out   
   
but still looks cool
if this were to happen the plane would drop due to gravity as neither fan is causing up draft to lift the plane. the two fans would cancel eachother out

but still looks cool
#34 to #32 - semilunarknight
Reply +1
(02/16/2013) [-]
Yup, even further the two meeting air currents would cause random air circulation that would never allow it to remain so stable
#54 - teevee
Reply +1
(02/16/2013) [-]
GUYS, IT'S JUST A STRING.
#33 - willindor
Reply +1
(02/16/2013) [-]
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