NUKING JUPITER..... This site has more information on the matter but for those less scientifically or mathematically inclined it might be a bit boring. . Did we jupiter science Nuclear potato
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NUKING JUPITER....

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NUKING JUPITER..... This site has more information on the matter but for those less scientifically or mathematically inclined it might be a bit boring. . Did we

This site has more information on the matter but for those less scientifically or mathematically inclined it might be a bit boring.

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Did we Nuke Jupiter?
Several years ago I was reading about the Galileo unmanned spacecraft which we sent to examine
Jupiter' s moons. The Galileo space probe was plutonium powered and was still functioning when it
was decided to crash the probe into Jupiter to prevent contamination of Jupiter' s moon Europa.
As a war nerd and always fond of learning about very destructive devices...
I always knew how a plutonium nuclear bomb worked.
This made me think... did we really do that... so like any internet nerd with a weird curiosity, I googled it and
sure enough others had come to the same conclusion and some with more knowledge than me.
A Plutonium nuclear bomb would slightly resemble a soccor ball where plates powered by
an explosive force would force an extreme pressure on the plutonium creating a critical
mass and cause nuclear Fission,
In short - Extreme pressure causes plutonium atoms to split and create massive energy...
i. e. an explosion.
Now Jupiter is big....
Gravity is significantly higher due to is
massive size meaning anything that comes
into contact with Jupiter would get crushed
and since it has no 'hard surface' it would
A continue falling as it was crushed.
About now you should be putting two and two together.
Plutonium + Pressure = Nuclear Explosion
Satellite powered by plutonium + Jupiter' s atmospheric pressure = ?
one month after the satellite was plunged into
Jupiter' s hydrogen depths..... this appeared.
Because of Jupiter' s densely compacted atmosphere. An objec' t rubric" into jupiter would be slowed
but would still eventually reach a crushing depth.
JUPITER - October, 19 was
Then these pictures were taken 30 minutes after
the First black splotch discovery.
Hamm that black trailing spot wasn' t there before.....
UT an UT
Astronomer' s discounted the possibility of an impact by asteroid due to the trailing
nature of the black splotch. We had recorded impacts before and this was different.
So did we nuke Jupiter? '
Most of which in this image was taken from a website (link in desc.) just simplified, supprized,
and shortened
So the next time someone asks if
its possible to turn Jupiter into a
second sun by Nuking it. _
You know its not.
We accidentally tried it...
...
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Views: 15807
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Submitted: 06/01/2012
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What do you think? Give us your opinion. Anonymous comments allowed.
#13 - anon (06/02/2012) [-]
Though technically powered by nuclear energy, the power source for Galileo was a General Purpose Heat Source Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator, which is very unlike a bomb. It simply harnesses the energy from it's radioactive decay.

It uses Pu-238 which is not a fissile material (unlike it's brother Pu-239 which is very fissile). So irregardless of how much pressure is applied, the Pu-238 cannot begin a fission process. Thus there couldn't be any man induced nuclear bomb from Galileo.
User avatar #20 to #13 - naysaykiller (06/02/2012) [-]
Science'd.
0
#36 to #13 - deathlordgusta has deleted their comment [-]
#64 to #13 - lolwutlolwut (06/02/2012) [-]
>irregardless
>a word

pick one
User avatar #37 to #35 - deathlordgusta (06/02/2012) [-]
freaking double comment could anyone explain to me how a hydrogen bomb works? i do know how a 'regular' nuclear bomb works.
+2
#43 to #37 - valki **User deleted account** has deleted their comment [-]
#1 - danielfm (06/01/2012) [-]
boom thread? boom thread
boom thread? boom thread
#2 to #1 - verycoolcat (06/01/2012) [-]
That made laugh and in short... that basically how nuclear bombs work.
#10 to #9 - giggitygiggitygooo (06/02/2012) [-]
All I've got
All I've got
#11 to #10 - Spikeydeath (06/02/2012) [-]
this count?
this count?
#25 - lesmiserables (06/02/2012) [-]
See THIS **** is what should be on the science ******* ******* science hugochannel.
User avatar #27 - madeyegubbins (06/02/2012) [-]
ALL THESE WORLDS ARE YOURS.
EXCEPT EUROPA.
ATTEMPT NO LANDINGS THERE.
USE THEM TOGETHER USE THEM IN PEACE.
#51 to #27 - olinerocks (06/02/2012) [-]
SOMEONE ELSE THOUGHT THAT TOO
#6 - illusiveman (06/02/2012) [-]
Comment Picture
User avatar #39 - iamrexraptor (06/02/2012) [-]
what if it exploded like alderaan and we were just like "the **** did we do!"
User avatar #61 - Ryukenblaze (06/02/2012) [-]
anyone want a piece of skin off my toe?
#16 - anon (06/02/2012) [-]
Well no. Nuking it wouldn't do **** . Jupiter isn't big enough to start the fusion process. Setting it on fire wouldn't work because there's a severe lack of oxygen to keep any sort of burning going.
#22 - anon (06/02/2012) [-]
Comment Picture
#29 - anon (06/02/2012) [-]
so they nuked Jupiter just to check if it will turn into another sun? What an assholes. Wouldn't it be kinda apocalyptic. No wonder nobody wants to come in contact with humans...
User avatar #32 to #29 - thepinkestofthepie (06/02/2012) [-]
No. You are an idiot.
#4 - skooman (06/01/2012) [-]
Wouldn't it not burn also due to the lack of oxygen because of their being no atmosphere on Jupiter capable of holding it? Or am I totally Brain-Farting right now?    
Gif Unrelated
Wouldn't it not burn also due to the lack of oxygen because of their being no atmosphere on Jupiter capable of holding it? Or am I totally Brain-Farting right now?
Gif Unrelated
#5 to #4 - anon (06/01/2012) [-]
Nuke's don't need oxygen, the expanding power comes from material at the blast site which is vaporized by the excess of radiation and heat.
#12 to #4 - realyboredguy (06/02/2012) [-]
A star doesn't work by burning hydrogen, but by fusing it in it's center. Really massive objects like the sun will have a high density inside, which means it will be hotter, and will have a high pressure, the two things required for a nuclear fusion, heat, and pressure. The temperature isn't enough to fuse large amounts, but because fusion release allot of energy, it gets hotter, hotter, hotter, and.... BOOM a star. Even with oxygen, it would be impossible for the hydrogen to just burn because the temperature would be to high for a water molecule to form. We could probably create the temperature necessary for Jupiter to fuse hydrogen in it's core, with a few nukes, but we still need the pressure, and Jupiter isn't massive enough to create the pressure required to make a nuclear fusion or maintain one we would start with a h bomb. But of a h bomb to work it would need to stay intact before it blows up, but the pressure of Jupiter would crush it.
#40 - peanutbutterjuice (06/02/2012) [-]
Actually, Jupiter has a ******* HIGH amount of gravity, only the moons in it's Orbit can withstand. If ANYTHING passes through, ex. the nuke, it will crush like an ant going into the Mariana's Trench. Therefore, we didnt
#41 to #40 - anon (06/02/2012) [-]
I'm not sure you understood the content...
#42 to #41 - peanutbutterjuice (06/02/2012) [-]
Im a ******* Astronomer you **** tard. Im 32 with a degree
#44 to #42 - thexiled (06/02/2012) [-]
You are 32, supposedly have a degree in astronomy, yet you got so easily offended by a simple anonymous post and called them a **** tard like a 12 year old would? I feel bad for anyone who disproves any of your work....
#45 to #44 - peanutbutterjuice (06/02/2012) [-]
I wasnt mad, I was making him get pissed and make him **** off. PLus he's an Anon
(or i say Amon) so I want to ******* punch him. And yes, my thing I wrote is serious, and it is the truth. So, they didn't nuke Jupiter because they nuke would implode
User avatar #46 to #45 - sparkytoast (06/02/2012) [-]
If you actually read the post, it states that plutonium reacts under great pressure causing an explosion; Therefore, there would have been an explosion Mr. Astronomer.
#48 to #46 - peanutbutterjuice (06/02/2012) [-]
Yes, but, Plutonium is never stable, and cannot withstand 30000 tons of weight on it's self.
#53 to #48 - tannertheguy (06/02/2012) [-]
stop trying to argue
stop trying to argue
User avatar #50 to #48 - olinerocks (06/02/2012) [-]
thats exactly what the post is saying... it is unstable and when it reaches that great of a pressure it will be similar to the conditions in a nuclear bomb
#52 to #50 - peanutbutterjuice (06/02/2012) [-]
The casing will Implode (Mainly Steel to Iron casing) will implode without causing it. The casing protects it a bit, so if the plutonium was in there, it would do an explosion maybe the size of one medium stick of Tnt, but not do the average explosion of a nuke, becuase of Pressure

User avatar #55 to #52 - olinerocks (06/02/2012) [-]
ohhhh I see what you were trying to say now. Kind of like how an explosion underwater seems smaller than one on the surface when you use an equal amount of explosives in both
#56 to #55 - anon (06/02/2012) [-]
Ah wow, this argument actually reached a conclusion that I understand and empathize with. I need to go back and get rid of some of those red thumbs...
#58 to #52 - boredinschool (06/02/2012) [-]
All that force is simply in a more compressed state but that still doesnt change the fact plutonium detonates upon extreme pressure. You basically contradicted yourself by admitting there would be an explosion but all that energy and radioactive contamination is still there.

Jupiter would have compressed the plutonium core to the point where the neutrons would be unable to move around without touching one another causing the atoms to release their neutrons and all their energy at once.

I didnt know astronomers studied that sort of thing
User avatar #62 - fantomen (06/02/2012) [-]
not possible.
the probe was powered by a plutonium nuclear battery.
It contains WAY to little plutonium to reach critical mass, and start a fission chain-reaction.
Worst thing that could happen would be that a small amount of radioactive heavy metal rained down on Jupiter.
User avatar #60 - gregoriez ONLINE (06/02/2012) [-]
i actually understand this
User avatar #33 - deathlordgusta (06/02/2012) [-]
depends on what kind of plutonium was used.
User avatar #28 - missdaisy (06/02/2012) [-]
If we nuked it, we would all be dead. Its a gas planet and if u set it off it would just explode.
User avatar #31 to #28 - maustraper (06/02/2012) [-]
americans....
User avatar #57 to #31 - manofparody (06/02/2012) [-]
Europeans... I swear.
Also, Mexicans...
Jews..
Muslims...
**** it, you're just an ignorant racist bastard that is more stupid than the stereotypical american.
User avatar #69 to #31 - djaelxs (06/03/2012) [-]
She's from Newjersycanada, the **** ?
User avatar #38 to #28 - djaelxs (06/02/2012) [-]
Okay. I'm going to explain to you, the basic physics behind a gas giant.

Gas giants are made up of... well, gas. Right? Right. Okay, lets hope we have that established here. Now, gas giants don't go kablooey into a new sun, because they simply don't have the mass. In jupiters case, it would require 70x the mass, and ALOT more gravity in order to spark nuclear fusion (Getting two hydrogen atoms so hot that they smash together, forming helium).
You, i hope, passed grade 7 science, so you should know that "gas", doesn't necessarily mean Gasoline, it can mean just water vapor, or in Jupiters case, Hydrogen and Helium.
Now, lets talk about your case here. Now we got the base physics up in this **** , lets talk how ******* retarded you just made yourself sound here, k?
A gas giant will not blow up simply because it got a nuke put into it, it would require oxygen to create combustion. The only reason the nuclear bomb went off is because it was seriously pressurized, it was basically the same effect of putting a ******** of mento's into a 2L of Diet Coke. It got seriously pressurized while inside that gas giant, that it went boom.
You may now ask questions, dumb bitch.
User avatar #30 to #28 - shikurukato (06/02/2012) [-]
So that might be the dumbest comment on funnyjunk today.

Good day sir, I am so very glad it wasn't me.
#21 - tartar (06/02/2012) [-]
Jupiter being a gas planet, the satellite could not detonate unless impacting on a solid surface. js
#24 to #21 - rvaugh (06/02/2012) [-]
time detonation, wouldn't be that hard to figure out when it would enter Jupiter
User avatar #59 to #21 - jalbno (06/02/2012) [-]
the high gravity caused the shell of the sattelite to implode , and the high pressure cause the atoms to split anyways.
User avatar #26 to #21 - jefglv (06/02/2012) [-]
Dude, didn't you read it? High gravity? Satellite crushed? The high pressure would still split the plutonium atoms, detonating it.
User avatar #17 - I Am Monkey (06/02/2012) [-]
Why is it that NASA is so concerned with "contaminating" other planets with earth bacteria? In this case they may have been referring to the plutonium, but it's usually in reference to accidentally spreading life. What exactly would be the downside to this?
+1
#19 to #17 - speightsix **User deleted account** has deleted their comment [-]
User avatar #14 - bakinboy ONLINE (06/02/2012) [-]
it would have to be at critical mass in order to detonate and not just fizzle
#3 - anon (06/01/2012) [-]
this was a good read, actually made me think. Thank you. But more items are reuired to create a fission reaction.
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