Free will. Something I've been pondering.. Actually you can't predict everything no matter how much data you gather. Quantum fluctuations are truly random. The most basic particles of matter have an inhe Free will Something I've been pondering Actually you can't predict everything no matter how much data gather Quantum fluctuations are truly random The most basic particles of have an inhe
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> hey anon, wanna give your opinion?
asd
User avatar #6 - traveltech
Reply +14 123456789123345869
(02/22/2013) [-]
Actually you can't predict everything no matter how much data you gather. Quantum fluctuations are truly random. The most basic particles of matter have an inherent randomness, at least as far as we understand them.
User avatar #24 to #6 - quantumlegend
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/22/2013) [-]
True, however this does not grant us free will, as those occurrences are still out of our control.
#45 to #6 - penguinthegreat
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/22/2013) [-]
maybe if we understood them better we would come to a conclusion that they aren't random
User avatar #74 to #45 - allamericandude
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/22/2013) [-]
That's what Einstein thought. He believed that we simply didn't know enough of the parameters to make the right predictions (and there are a core group of physicists who are still holding on to this belief). But it turns out experimentally that quantum mechanics really is inherently random.

Of course, that theory is still at the mercy of new evidence, but the tests done so far have all come to the same conclusion.
User avatar #125 to #74 - legionx
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/28/2013) [-]
this is really shown by the properties of electrons, you cant tell where they are going but not where they are or you can tell where they are but not where they're going; and the theoretical box in which the cat could be dead or alive but you don't know because the box is closed
User avatar #127 to #125 - allamericandude
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/28/2013) [-]
Not just electrons, all of the subatomic particles behave this way--quarks, gluons, photons, and so forth. Even entire atoms in some cases.
User avatar #126 to #125 - legionx
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/28/2013) [-]
typo- CAN tell where they are going but not where they are
User avatar #62 to #45 - traveltech
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/22/2013) [-]
Maybe, but we can't assume that
#60 - Coolstorybroseph
Reply +7 123456789123345869
(02/22/2013) [-]
But can you see why kids love Cinnamon Toast Crunch?
#66 to #60 - sixroller **User deleted account**
+1 123456789123345869
has deleted their comment [-]
User avatar #91 - ichooseslowpoke
Reply +6 123456789123345869
(02/22/2013) [-]
But do you know why kids love the taste of Cinnamon Toast Crunch?!?
#84 - myhumps
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(02/22/2013) [-]
So by that logic, if an asian person can calculate every single aspect of your brain, they can read your mind?
User avatar #87 to #84 - tdogmeds
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/22/2013) [-]
More like an asian computer.
User avatar #105 to #84 - justinsane
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/23/2013) [-]
that's part of the point, yes
User avatar #26 - killingsin
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(02/22/2013) [-]
And then quantum mechanics come along and just ruin everything with it's dammed randomness.
#73 - infinitereaper
Reply +4 123456789123345869
(02/22/2013) [-]
Yeah, sure, assuming our perception of reality isn't inherently flawed and entirely correct to to begin with.

Measurability, our human definition that is-may be incorrect as to the reality. See, we are limited by these bodies would generate understanding as an afterthought. The true nature of truth and universe is likely far behind our completely pathetic concepts. For it is our concepts that are derived from brains that the universe or reality doesn't necessary have to have designed in a way that makes them capable of understanding the world it exists in... so to speak.

Basically, all of this logic is bound by the human machine which is probably flawed. Thus flawed logic and flawed conclusions. Meaning most of this jargon is nothing but speculation that is very likely incorrect.

TL;DR Stupid post.
#83 to #73 - ddrredneck
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(02/22/2013) [-]
for the record..... you just tried to use logic to disprove the validity of logic.... You do realize the limitations of that, correct?
User avatar #101 to #83 - infinitereaper
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/23/2013) [-]
Exactly. We can't even be sure we even have the ability to even, even when trying to even.
#80 - lavitts
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(02/22/2013) [-]
Why, Mr. Anderson? Why do you do it? Why get up? Why keep fighting? Do you believe you're fighting for something? For more than your survival? Can you tell me what it is? Do you even know? Is it freedom? Or truth? Perhaps peace? Could it be for love? Illusions, Mr. Anderson. Vagaries of perception. The temporary constructs of a feeble human intellect trying desperately to justify an existence that is without meaning or purpose. And all of them as artificial as the Matrix itself. Although, only a human mind could invent something as insipid as love. You must be able to see it, Mr. Anderson. You must know it by now. You can't win. It's pointless to keep fighting. Why, Mr. Anderson, Why? Why do you persist?
#89 to #80 - tdogmeds
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(02/22/2013) [-]
Because reasons.
#72 - milkandeggs
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(02/22/2013) [-]
Well ****.
User avatar #21 - cheesymuffins
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(02/22/2013) [-]
Uncertainty principle is based, in part, in our current abilities of measuring things. This is because all of our methods of measuring things use what I'll call 'active' forms of measurement. What I mean by that is our current forms of measurement throw something at what we're measuring, and then record what happens to what we threw, to put it crudely. Whether that be light or electrons, we throw them at things, and record what happens.
Now when I put it so crudely, you can see how the methods we use to measure things aren't ideal, because some of the things we want to measure, like single atoms or single electrons, can be measurably affected by what we're throwing.
Another part is our lack of understanding. We just haven't figured it out yet. We've essentially invented an excuse for our current lack of understanding. We don't know how to invent the tools we need to measure things without uncertainty. Eventually, we'll get it.
#12 - verycoolcat
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(02/22/2013) [-]
Quantum Mechanics Bitch!

Take everything you know about physics.... and THROW IT OUT THE WINDOW.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uncertainty_principle

User avatar #40 to #12 - GritaGris
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(02/22/2013) [-]
In no way whatsoever are Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle and determinism icompatible