I'm not even English.... ...but this just struck me as funny somehow.. The Japanese language has a number of different ways to write certain words. One possible American rice English heroes
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I'm not even English.... ...but this just struck me as funny somehow.. The Japanese language has a number of different ways to write certain words. One possible

...but this just struck me as funny somehow.

The Japanese language has
a number of different ways
to write certain words.
One possible way of writing
America" is:
This is a character that usually
means "rice".
When writing "England" in a
similar way, we get this:
This character roughly means
heroic".
...
+308
Views: 17300 Submitted: 04/08/2014
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[ 66 comments ]
> hey anon, wanna give your opinion?
asd
User avatar #4 - PgFalcon
Reply +54 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
Considering how important rice is to the japanese I'm flattered.
User avatar #6 to #4 - thephoenix
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
You're optimistic as ****, I'm impressed.
#1 - futeko
Reply +54 123456789123345869
(04/08/2014) [-]
Those are actually abbreviations - they just happen to mean something else by themselves:   
   
USA = Amerika = 亜米利加 = 米 (which is also the Kanji for Rice, bei)   
UK = Igirisu = 英吉利 = 英 (which is also the Kanji for Hero, ei)   
   
The reason Japanese uses the "me" kanji (米) of Amerika rather than the `a' one (亜) may be because Japanese uses 亜 as an abbreviation of Asia, from its kanji writing 亜細亜 (Ajia).    
   
(source: www.sljfaq.org/afaq/beikoku.html )
Those are actually abbreviations - they just happen to mean something else by themselves:

USA = Amerika = 亜米利加 = 米 (which is also the Kanji for Rice, bei)
UK = Igirisu = 英吉利 = 英 (which is also the Kanji for Hero, ei)

The reason Japanese uses the "me" kanji (米) of Amerika rather than the `a' one (亜) may be because Japanese uses 亜 as an abbreviation of Asia, from its kanji writing 亜細亜 (Ajia).

(source: www.sljfaq.org/afaq/beikoku.html )
#48 to #1 - crosskill
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
User avatar #5 to #1 - PgFalcon
Reply +8 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
This is what happens when your alphabet is made up entirely of whole words...
#36 to #5 - heretics
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
That's why they have the additional alphabets of hiragana and katakana.
アメリカ is the common spelling of America.
User avatar #47 to #36 - PgFalcon
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
That just adds unnecessary complexity then. Why have multiple alphabets?
#51 to #47 - heretics
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
When they learned writing from the Chinese they found it hard to apply to Japanese language without modification. So in time they made their own syllabary alphabet (hiragana) to make writing in the common language easier. Then they made katakana to be able to pronounce the words in Sanskrit scripture and other foreign languages. So it serves its purposes.
User avatar #61 to #51 - PgFalcon
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
Apparently there are over 50,000 'kanji' in the japanese language... none of them the same. Compare this to the 2 different 46 letter alphabets they have, or better yet compare it to the 26 letter alphabet of English, and you understand my concern.
User avatar #60 to #51 - PgFalcon
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
It's amazing anyone over there can read or write... But I guess in today's modern culture we're not so different, what with all the internet shorthand born of texting with dialpads and what not... but their adaption really seems like a leap backwards in efficiency since now it would take three characters to say what one character used to, albiet those three characters are much easier to write by hand than the miniature pictographs of the regular stuff.

Honestly, the Japanese are crazy. They themselves probably don't fully understand their own language.
#62 to #60 - heretics
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
They perfectly understand their language. Every language has its own characteristics that come natural to the native speaker but strike as odd to the non-native speaker. Take my language for example, taking words and putting them together into different words: Nordvästersjökustartilleriflygspaningssimulatoranläggningsmaterielunderhålls uppföljningssystemdiskussionsinläggsförberedelsearbeten.
User avatar #64 to #62 - PgFalcon
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
Maybe it's just because Japanese is such an old language that it's run across these limiting factors in the modern age. It's had to be more flexible and versatile in the last hundred years than it's had to be in the past 10,000, It simply wasn't built to easily facilitate new technologies like the internet and keyboards, and wasn't easily compatible with foreign cultures. Languages like english, spanish, french, german, italian, and even crazy languages like russian all come from the same area where their centuries of shared culture has allowed them to influence each other and evolve side by side... while Japan's isolationist culture up until the turn of hte century has meant that their language and culture never benefited from such evolutionary influences and so beads like oil on water when it comes into contact with other culturs and their languages.
User avatar #63 to #62 - PgFalcon
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
That's something just about every language does. It's how new words evolve and the language stays up to date. If it isn't stolen or adapted from some other language or culture (it it ain't broke don't change it simply because your arrogance requires your own unique word for something) then it's created. Technology usually is the best example of all that what with words like telephone, computers, internet, automotives, railways, airplanes, etc...

Which I find hilarious, because you can usually tell the country of origin of something by the language of it's name. In english we unashamedly call spaghetti by its proper italian name, as well as just about everything else foriegn from fez's to jalapenos and chicken fajitas. I don't know of many other languages that do that nearly so naturally. In japanese, for instance, you'll foreign words stick out like massive sore thumbs in the mouths of the japanese because the usually literally can't pronounce parts of the word because entire parts of said word don't exist natively in their language, such as L's. It's hard for them to integrate other languages with their own because there's such a sharp contrast... whereas languages like English seem to have zero problem with accepting just about every kind of word and adopting it into the fold as if the word had always existed in the english language.
User avatar #12 - snakefire
Reply +31 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
We nuked them so hard they think we're rice.
User avatar #19 to #12 - mrmuffins
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
Haven't laughed like that for a long time.
#28 to #12 - darthsalias
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
that comment just.... lol
that comment just.... lol
User avatar #55 to #12 - vikingesnumerouno
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
I shouldn't laugh but ******* hell did I laugh.
#20 - Ruspanic
Reply +11 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
Don't know Japanese, but in Mandarin Chinese America is 美国 meiguo, meaning "beautiful country".

mfw
User avatar #26 to #20 - ilbacondeity
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
that made me blush for some reason.
#13 - kulamia
Reply +10 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
Your name is Heroic? Good for you guys.

Our abbreviation is so god damned important it's shared with the name of their staple crop since a Japan existed.
#46 - bocatadesesos
Reply +7 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
Comment Picture
User avatar #56 to #46 - aabbccddeeffgghhii
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
That guy is the funniest ****** I have ever seen on YouTube.
#42 - xgreenmaidenx
Reply +6 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
This one is chinese, but i wanted to show you all anyway.
It's the literal translations of the chinese names of the european countries.
User avatar #57 to #42 - captnnorway
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
damn you, I wanted to post that.

I'll post the srouce anyway
twistedsifter.com/2013/08/maps-that-will-help-you-make-sense-of-the-world/
#59 to #42 - heretics
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
"Very Lucky Soldiers"
User avatar #66 to #42 - dyalibya
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
Thanks , I was looking for this one
User avatar #52 to #42 - ttubkcid
Reply +1 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
I love how everything is like some random google translated words, then there's Russia
User avatar #45 to #42 - damping
Reply +3 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
LOL at Moral-Land for Germany.
User avatar #22 - yunoknow
Reply +5 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
we just use the sound, don't flatter yourself.
User avatar #14 - evebishop
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
The character for "Rice" is very important, it is said that seven gods live in a grain of rice (because of the characters used to write the word) and for a long time rice was their most valuable crop...it meant almost everything to Japanese people
User avatar #23 to #14 - Shramin
Reply 0 123456789123345869
(04/09/2014) [-]
Kinda like the potato for Scandivegians
#2 - absolutiondreams
Reply +2 123456789123345869
(04/08/2014) [-]
I can't tell if it's ironic that the character for America looks like the Union Jack   
<-Union Jack for reference
I can't tell if it's ironic that the character for America looks like the Union Jack
<-Union Jack for reference