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Grow show bro

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Submitted: 07/12/2014
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What do you think? Give us your opinion. Anonymous comments allowed.
#3 - walcorn ONLINE (07/12/2014) [-]
Thank you for the info on the potatoes.
Thank you for the info on the potatoes.
#6 to #3 - irishlawyer (07/13/2014) [-]
Here, take this
Here, take this
User avatar #37 to #3 - potatoguy (07/13/2014) [-]
Yes. Spread the seeds of my children.
#8 - mrvindix (07/13/2014) [-]
I guess I'll save this for later.
#13 - fitemeirlbro (07/13/2014) [-]
bes tuse for leeks
bes tuse for leeks
#11 - robuntu (07/13/2014) [-]
Not a popular opinion, but it's a lot more cost effective to let a few people specializing in growing food (farmers) and just pay them for vegetables. They can use economics-of-scale and farm HUGE plots of cheap land, far from cities, with huge, incredibly efficient machines. And they can devote all of their time to understanding the science that goes into planting.

You'll spend more on topsoil to get you're garden started than you would on a year's supply of carrots or whatever you want to plant.
User avatar #19 to #11 - theincorrigibleone (07/13/2014) [-]
I've got a 70x70 ft. plot I garden. You get plenty of composting materials from the grass you cut, weeds you pull, and from the leftover portions of the plants you harvest that you don't have to buy topsoil. Plus, on top of that I sell plenty of stuff at a bargain price to friends and family. They know exactly where the stuff is coming from, what I use on it (i.e. no chems or anything like that), and it's cheaper than going to a grocery store for all of it, especially the tomatoes.
It doesn't even take too much effort in the long run to run a plot like that. I'm 21 and have my girlfriend who is 20 living with me (it's a 2 acre yard with a good size farm house I got from my grandfather who I took almost sole care of). She works part time and I work full time. Once you get a lot of the plants started, especially if you use raised garden boxes, there is little to no weeding required. It's only REALLY necessary when they're young so that they don't get choked out. Once they get to a larger size, they shade out everything around them and the weeds don't even get a chance to grow. And the best part about it all is that a lot of the things you'll grow will offer up harvest either multiple times throughout the year or for rather long periods of time. The main ones that don't are watermelon and corn. They can be big space hogs and don't produce nearly as much as say squash or broccoli.
#25 to #11 - billburr (07/13/2014) [-]
It might be a little bit more cost-effective (not as much as you seem to think), but the taste and quality is so much higher. And after a couple years it's barely costing you anything anyways.
And as far as true efficiency goes, if we took into account what we're doing to the planet then we wouldn't be shipping this food all around the world in the first place. It's not like most people are buying from a farmer's market.
#28 to #25 - robuntu (07/13/2014) [-]
I'm not claiming there aren't environmental benefits.

I'm just saying, in terms of cost effectiveness, it's more expensive for individuals to grow their own food than farmers (even with the shipping costs included). Everyone seems to be ignoring the cost of the land they own - in a suburb or city a small plot of land costs a lot of money. Most people have a mortgage, but even if they don't, they did pay a large sum of money for it.

Minimum wage in the US is 7.25

Add up all the time it takes to garden, the cost of any materials used, the cost of the land your using and, for almost everyone; it would be cheaper to simply buy the food.

If you enjoy it - then sure, go for it.
If you want to help the environment - cool, go for it.
If you think it tastes better - awesome, knock you'reself out.

I'm not against growing stuff. Just that it's not cost-effective.
#41 to #28 - billburr (07/14/2014) [-]
You make a well-thought out argument and I am given no choice but to agree.
For me, the idea of food being made in you're house is just super cool. Having a couple indoor-orange trees seems almost magic to me, could you imagine having that when you were a kid?
My kid is gonna have that, he's gonna have a house where food grows
User avatar #40 to #11 - comedytrash (07/14/2014) [-]
Yeah but what are you going to do, during a long term zombie apocolypse? Think. Be safe. Be smart.
User avatar #12 to #11 - Petroleum ONLINE (07/13/2014) [-]
Some people just garden for fun, and the vegetables or fruit they get is simply a byproduct.
#14 to #12 - robuntu (07/13/2014) [-]
Yeah - which is why I said 'a lot more cost effective'.

If it's a hobby you enjoy - cool. But a lot of people think it will save them money and it rarely does.
User avatar #16 to #14 - misticalz ONLINE (07/13/2014) [-]
Or
years before you start you're garden
build up compost,
Compost you're garden area
See if clovers or alfalfa grow
wait awhile, or just get pH/Nitrogen balancer.

you're soil is now rich in what ever it is.
Don't let grass grow on it, as it will drain all the nitrogen quickly.
:^)
#18 to #16 - robuntu (07/13/2014) [-]
That's only cost effective if you ignore the cost of owning you're land and the cost of you're time.

'Hey - check out these carrots I grew. Only took me four years!'
User avatar #30 to #18 - thebaseballexpert ONLINE (07/13/2014) [-]
but it only takes 3-4 months for carrots to grow
#5 - irishlawyer (07/13/2014) [-]
***** you forgot about marigolds
They deter birds and ****
#29 - madzino (07/13/2014) [-]
i like how fj goes from pedophilia and rape jokes to guides on how to grow vegetables at home.
#15 - goseikiba (07/13/2014) [-]
Comment Picture
#35 - westonbeast (07/13/2014) [-]
I suddenly just got the strangest urge to play Harvest Moon.
User avatar #17 - obidomkenobi (07/13/2014) [-]
Thumb for you OP. I have a yard, pure concrete, no grass. So I have an old bath tub there I want to start planting in next year as well as some old pots and stuff. I want to grow some veg as well as plants, and this guide will definitely help.
User avatar #20 to #17 - theincorrigibleone (07/13/2014) [-]
Glad to see some other people getting into it. Though you'll want to do a bit more research instead of just using this.
For instance, get in contact with you're local extension office for info on what grows well in you're area based on local soil makeup and weather patterns. www.csrees.usda.gov/Extension/
User avatar #21 to #20 - obidomkenobi (07/13/2014) [-]
Is that site just for the US? And I have no grass or soil in my yard. It's just pure concrete. I want some pretty colour in it. And some free vegetables.
User avatar #22 to #21 - theincorrigibleone (07/13/2014) [-]
That one specifically is just for the US. However, most developed countries should have something fairly similar if there is much cultivation at all going on in them.
User avatar #23 to #22 - obidomkenobi (07/13/2014) [-]
I'll have a look-see. I live in the urban jungle of the U.K. If it were Yorkshire or somewhere, it would have been a lot better.
User avatar #1 - beren (07/12/2014) [-]
Neat.
#4 - almightysourcerer (07/12/2014) [-]
**almightysourcerer rolled image**
#34 to #4 - celticviking (07/13/2014) [-]
pretty sure everyone needs to read that
pretty sure everyone needs to read that
#24 - splyt (07/13/2014) [-]
someone wunna post a similar image that includes growin pot? haha like i don't know i'll get thumbed to hell, but digestive end product if just ONE person wants to be cool then this will work
#26 to #24 - anon (07/13/2014) [-]
User avatar #32 to #26 - landerp (07/13/2014) [-]
I don't think this is bait, I think you just don't like weed.
#39 to #32 - splyt (07/14/2014) [-]
nor does FJ really like the people who DO like weed, or at least those who don't mind sharing
#38 - bluwizard (07/14/2014) [-]
**bluwizard rolled image** what I farm
User avatar #36 - dodomut (07/13/2014) [-]
wheres the pumpkin
#31 - xxcxpxx (07/13/2014) [-]
**xxcxpxx rolled image** i shall now go get 99 farming on runescape
#27 - anon (07/13/2014) [-]
where's fruit i want life to literally give me lemmons
#10 - metalcoldreaper (07/13/2014) [-]
Where's my potatoes.
User avatar #9 - shadylight (07/13/2014) [-]
This is actually something I will need. Since am growing stuff in my backyard. Thanks OP. Now I can realize my dream of growing my own orange dildo's in my backyard.
User avatar #7 - shadowknife (07/13/2014) [-]
cucumbers? in a patio garden? you ******* me? The one time i grew cucumbers in a plot garden they took over EVERYTHING. you put that **** on a patio an you wont have a patio anymore! it'll just be a mass of prickly leaves and prickly fruit (the cucumber itself)
#33 to #7 - anon (07/13/2014) [-]
It depends on the type of cucumber plant. Just like squash, there are vining types and then there are bush types. Bush varieties are more compact.
#2 - bitchplzzz (07/12/2014) [-]
**bitchplzzz rolls 41**
**bitchplzzz rolls 41**
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