Glitch in Matrix. i have no idea how this works, but if someone could explain this sorcery for me that would be great... It works with the polarity of light, the polraized filter makes sure only light of one direction goes through. wikipedia that . help please explain Matrix glitch Sorcery lifehack 3d 3D glasses
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#1 - goobyman
Reply +191
(06/07/2014) [+] (16 replies)
stickied by penguinraider
It works with the polarity of light, the polraized filter makes sure only light of one direction goes through. wikipedia that ****.
#70 to #1 - guidedhand
Reply -2
(06/08/2014) [-]
Stop feeding lies. You in no way explain how the light is let through the second polarizer
#17 to #1 - sreggin
Reply -1
(06/07/2014) [-]
that doesnt explain why the second lens lets you see through both. at least you tried i guess
#68 to #17 - guidedhand
Reply 0
(06/08/2014) [-]
You are so very correct. Unless op is tricky, and the first screen is actually a half wave plate, you shouldnt be seeing anything through the camera. Thats how polarization works.
#19 to #17 - goobyman
Reply 0
(06/07/2014) [-]
what
yes it does... the first and second lens let you see through. turning the polarized filter makes you see light that is turned in that direction, the light from the monitor is going the other way and blocking it in the black lens. the second filter lets you see through as well as the first filter.
#21 to #19 - sreggin
Reply 0
(06/07/2014) [-]
nvm i thought you understood what you were talking about
#23 to #21 - goobyman
Reply +1
(06/07/2014) [-]
OH NOW I SEE WHAT YOU MEAN
the lens in front of the camera depolarizes the light (it is turned in a direction that cancels out the light from the screen) and the second filter that he holds up with his hand re-polarizes the light.
#71 to #23 - guidedhand
Reply 0
(06/08/2014) [-]
Depolarizes the light? what?. if the first polarizer's optical axis is 90 degrees to the plane of polarization of the LCD light, it would block ALL of the light trying to come through. No matter how you position the second polarizer, you wont see anything, due to there being nothing to see. I dont know what youre talking about with 'repolarizing' the light, but you clearly dont have a decent understanding of optics.
I think OP is just screwing with people in that last photo.
#22 to #21 - goobyman
Reply +1
(06/07/2014) [-]
I am..... you clearly don't know what you're saying. I don't even understand what you mean by the second lens, they're both the same lens.
#45 to #22 - mackanb
Reply +2
(06/08/2014) [-]
The light from the screen is polarized in one direction. By holding the first (closest to the screen) lens at a 45 degree angle you allow 50% of the light to get through, since the polarity follows a cos^2(x) formula. The light exiting from the first lens is polarized 45 degrees, and enters the second lens, attached to the camera, and again half of the power is lost, so a total of 25% gets through everything. But directly from the screen, nothing gets through the lens at the camera, because the difference between the polarity of the light and the polarity of the lens is 90 degrees, and cos^2(90) = 0.

In short: cos^2(45)*cos^2(45) = 0.25
cos^2(90) = 0
#60 to #1 - batchedg
Reply -1
(06/08/2014) [-]
ONLY LIGHT OF ONE DIRECTION YOU SAY???
#34 to #1 - anon
Reply 0
(06/07/2014) [-]
Comment Picture
#51 to #1 - anon
Reply 0
(06/08/2014) [-]
That's not anywhere CLOSE to right. Good job reducing the credibility of the internet even more
#2 to #1 - penguinraider [OP] ONLINE
Reply +7
(06/07/2014) [-]
and i though i found the meaning of life
and i though i found the meaning of life
#3 to #2 - goobyman
Reply +3
(06/07/2014) [-]
nay
this is old as balls, like 4 years old?
#4 to #3 - penguinraider [OP] ONLINE
Reply +2
(06/07/2014) [-]
think it's still cool tho, never seen it before
#6 to #2 - Maroon ONLINE
Reply +1
(06/07/2014) [-]
awe, your poor little mind must have been thoroughly blown. Sorry for the let down
#27 - thesimonved
Reply +84
(06/07/2014) [+] (14 replies)
stickied by penguinraider
Real ******* neato is this: Just take the polarized layer of your LCD, cut it in shape and swap it with the lenses of an old pair of sunglasses or 3D-glasses....secret monitor!

More Infos 'n' **** www.instructables.com/id/Privacy-monitor-made-from-an-old-LCD-Monitor/
#53 to #27 - frankwest
Reply 0
(06/08/2014) [-]
That computer is a Daewoo.
#54 to #27 - darthsanti
Reply 0
(06/08/2014) [-]
that's actually very useful for some secret thing
#59 to #27 - dagramcraka
Reply 0
(06/08/2014) [-]
I tried that once.. didn't work to well...
#72 to #27 - anon
Reply 0
(06/08/2014) [-]
Now I can jack off to seemingly blank screen. Sweet.
#74 to #27 - xtrem
Reply 0
(06/08/2014) [-]
one question : Does every LCD Comes with polarized layer ?
I am looking for a used LCD to do this
#76 to #74 - warioteam
Reply +1
(06/08/2014) [-]
its an essential part of LCD monitoring, yes.
#77 to #76 - xtrem
Reply 0
(06/08/2014) [-]
cool , time to find a cheap one on the internet , the shops are selling the old and used ones 14' for 60$ . asses
#83 to #27 - TheBigGummyBear ONLINE
Reply 0
(06/08/2014) [-]
Uneducated question here:

Would looking at that screen through those glasses be bad for your eyes? Or would it be just as bad as looking at your screen normally.
#87 to #83 - hairibar
Reply 0
(06/08/2014) [-]
It's completely harmless for all I know
#61 to #27 - hellomynameisbill ONLINE
Reply +5
(06/08/2014) [-]
imagine the reaction from people seeing a dude laughing his ass off to a blank white screen
#32 to #27 - pillowmeister
Reply +11
(06/07/2014) [-]
Yeah, but does it work while masturbating in a cyber café?
#97 to #32 - thesimonved
Reply +1
(06/08/2014) [-]
Why don't you find out?
#98 to #97 - pillowmeister
Reply +1
(06/08/2014) [-]
I'm asking because i OWN a café
#100 to #98 - thesimonved
Reply +1
(06/08/2014) [-]
That's pretty cool, but you're in no danger
#86 - admantris
Reply +10
(06/08/2014) [-]
stickied by penguinraider
**admantris rolled image**
#84 - rockamekishiko
Reply +1
(06/08/2014) [+] (6 replies)
stickied by penguinraider
what i want to know is why monitors have a layer of polarized glass/plastic
#93 to #84 - rzkruspe
0
has deleted their comment [-]
#94 to #84 - rzkruspe
Reply 0
(06/08/2014) [-]
The back of your screen is fully enlightened by light tubes (or LEDs). The first polarizer makes sure the light goes on only vertically.
Then the liquid crystals control the direction of the beam, before another polarizer (horizontal this time); the more horizontal the beam is, the more light will pass through the horizontal polarizer.
That last filter is the one you were talking about.
#99 to #94 - rockamekishiko
Reply 0
(06/08/2014) [-]
i mean, why do they polarize the light?
#101 to #99 - rzkruspe
Reply 0
(06/08/2014) [-]
"The more horizontal the beam becomes, the more light will pass through the second polarizer. "
Simply to control the luminosity of each cell (RVB * nb of px)
#102 to #101 - rockamekishiko
Reply 0
(06/09/2014) [-]
ahh ok. thanks
#95 to #94 - rzkruspe
Reply 0
(06/08/2014) [-]
I meant to use another image, so don't bother with vertically/horizontally
#9 - drtrousersnake
Reply +57
(06/07/2014) [-]
natural light "vibrates" in random directions. Only the light that "vibrates" in a certain direction is able to pass through a polarized lens.
#15 to #9 - anon
Reply 0
(06/07/2014) [-]
That picture makes it look like vertically vibrating light passes through a horizontal polarizing filter, which is just wrong.
#39 to #9 - wiredguy
Reply +1
(06/07/2014) [-]
also, yeah, anon is right, I should have looked closer.

here's a real life, practical analogy for what happens, just to illustrate why that picture is wrong.
#14 to #9 - wiredguy
Reply +3
(06/07/2014) [-]
light doesn't vibrate, it is a vibration

the magnetic and electric fields do the vibrating
#33 to #14 - cryingchicken
Reply +2
(06/07/2014) [-]
Stop being so pedantic, his answer was perfectly sufficient as a simple explanation. You didn't need to involve technicalities to try to make yourself seem smarter than he is.
#47 to #33 - Lilstow
Reply 0
(06/08/2014) [-]
semantics are very important in physics.
#37 to #33 - wiredguy
Reply 0
(06/07/2014) [-]
Stop being so vilifying, my reply was perfectly relevant. You didn't need to put down a perfectly polite point of accuracy to try to make yourself seem like you're a better person.
#38 to #37 - cryingchicken
Reply 0
(06/07/2014) [-]
I thought you were trying to invalidate what he said. now i feel bad
#41 to #38 - wiredguy
Reply +1
(06/08/2014) [-]
funny thing is though, the polarisation of most light is actually circular, or elliptical.   
since the electric and magnetic components to the wave are at a 90 degree offset to each other, you get a resultant polarisation like this.   
   
if you didn't already know, I mean.   
I just think this whole topic is really interesting.
funny thing is though, the polarisation of most light is actually circular, or elliptical.
since the electric and magnetic components to the wave are at a 90 degree offset to each other, you get a resultant polarisation like this.

if you didn't already know, I mean.
I just think this whole topic is really interesting.
#40 to #38 - wiredguy
Reply 0
(06/07/2014) [-]
hah, not at all, it's a pretty good summary.
I just had this funny image in my head of a vibration trying to vibrate, and I thought it'd be worth mentioning.

sorry if it came off badly <3
#57 to #14 - drtrousersnake
Reply 0
(06/08/2014) [-]
ergo the use of quotes in "vibrates"
#96 to #57 - wiredguy
Reply 0
(06/08/2014) [-]
ahhh, hm, that's good to hear

I honestly wasn't trying to be rude, it was a good comment. I'm terrible at condensing and could never have explained it that well in so few words, hahah
#12 - helpmedudes
Reply +15
(06/07/2014) [-]
I just learned about this.  So I don't know if anyone answered yet, but it has to do with the fact that light travels in waves.  These transverse (waves that move up and down while moving across space- like ocean waves and radio waves) waves move horizontally and vertically.  50% polarized lenses will block either the horizontal or the vertical and let the other 50% of light in.  Even if you have two lenses and they are both parallel to each other, they will still let through 50% of the light.  When you shift one perpendicular to the other, you cause problems.  One is blocking 50% and the other is blocking the other 50%.  This is also the difference between legally tinted windows and illegally.  Also, you must sacrifice your firstborn to use it, and bathe in the blood of the innocent.  Hope I helped.
I just learned about this. So I don't know if anyone answered yet, but it has to do with the fact that light travels in waves. These transverse (waves that move up and down while moving across space- like ocean waves and radio waves) waves move horizontally and vertically. 50% polarized lenses will block either the horizontal or the vertical and let the other 50% of light in. Even if you have two lenses and they are both parallel to each other, they will still let through 50% of the light. When you shift one perpendicular to the other, you cause problems. One is blocking 50% and the other is blocking the other 50%. This is also the difference between legally tinted windows and illegally. Also, you must sacrifice your firstborn to use it, and bathe in the blood of the innocent. Hope I helped.
#13 to #12 - helpmedudes
Reply 0
(06/07/2014) [-]
because I am a ******* retard, I did not notice the stickied comment.
#16 to #13 - electricfart ONLINE
Reply +1
(06/07/2014) [-]
But you explained transverse waves so for that I commend you
#44 to #13 - fukyu
Reply -1
(06/08/2014) [-]
admitting it is the first step.
#50 to #44 - helpmedudes
Reply +1
(06/08/2014) [-]
Thumb for you because your name reminded me of Austin Powers. And yes, yes it is.
#52 to #50 - fukyu
Reply 0
(06/08/2014) [-]
right back at ya, and believe it or not i wasn't even thinking of austin powers when i made this account, i was just pissed that all my accounts got banned for red thumbs back when that was still a possibility
#18 to #12 - sreggin
Reply 0
(06/07/2014) [-]
see 17
#11 - lolfacejimmy
Reply +8
(06/07/2014) [-]
How do 3D glasses work - Sixty Symbols
#26 to #11 - adzodeux
Reply 0
(06/07/2014) [-]
penguinraider sticky this
#55 - zomaru ONLINE
Reply +6
(06/08/2014) [-]
Everyone saying basically the same thing, but they keep arguing with each other, I'm confused.
#89 to #55 - crackedpepper
Reply 0
(06/08/2014) [-]
welcome to science. many times the nuances of what is said and how you say it can lead to different meanings.
#48 - cinematicbrix
Reply -4
(06/08/2014) [-]
It's called polarization, but I guess you haven't gotten to learn about that in 8th grade yet.
#82 to #48 - takesomemorewater
Reply 0
(06/08/2014) [-]
Well aren't you a special little snowflake.
#58 to #48 - brutallyhonest
Reply +5
(06/08/2014) [-]
Hey, you know that really specific thing about that really specific topic in a specific subject that is rarely taught specifically? If you don't know that, you're an idiot!!!!!!
#7 - szatan
Reply +4
(06/07/2014) [-]
******* witchcraft!
#25 - adzodeux
Reply +3
(06/07/2014) [-]
AS Physics, yay
#85 to #25 - garethof
Reply +1
(06/08/2014) [-]
I have the unit 2 exam tomorrow...
#92 to #85 - poonraider
Reply +1
(06/08/2014) [-]
Me too, I'm hoping it's mostly mechanics