Alzheimer's. My memory foam pillow remembers better than this persons grandpa. My grandpa has Alzheimer' s so he has no idea who my grandma is but everyday for  alzheimers Flowers Wife tumblr sadfaec
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Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's. My memory foam pillow remembers better than this persons grandpa. My grandpa has Alzheimer' s so he has no idea who my grandma is but everyday for

My memory foam pillow remembers better than this persons grandpa

My grandpa has Alzheimer' s so he
has no idea who my grandma is but
everyday for the last three or four
months he brings her in flowers from
their garden and asks her he run
away with him and be his wife and
everyday she says she already is and
everyday the smile my grandpa gets
on his face is the mast beautiful
heartfelt thing I have ever seen.
...
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Views: 30012
Favorited: 80
Submitted: 02/28/2014
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Comments(97):

[ 97 comments ]
What do you think? Give us your opinion. Anonymous comments allowed.
User avatar #12 - sardinez (03/01/2014) [-]
how big is their ******* garden
User avatar #13 to #12 - mrgoodlove (03/01/2014) [-]
I don't know, but their regular garden is huge
User avatar #5 - doombunni (03/01/2014) [-]
My grandpa had Alzheimers and wouldn't recognize anybody when he saw them, but would instantly know who they were over the phone. It was weird
#14 to #5 - anon (03/01/2014) [-]
Hello, Grandpa?
Y-yes. Who is this?
This is, doombunni.
Ah, yes! Doombunni! How are you doing?
Did it go something like this?
User avatar #49 to #5 - Epicgetguy ONLINE (03/01/2014) [-]
I think it's when the part of the brain that controls emotions and memory is disconnected with the part of your brain that controls sight. Because it's connected to his hearing, not his sight, he's able to recognized you through hearing your voice.

It's an odd condition I forgot the name of.
User avatar #66 to #49 - nighkey (03/01/2014) [-]
*Psychology student.* Retrograde Amnesia, Alzheimers, decays most recent memory, progressively going farther and farther back. This is why they would recognize voices and not faces, because people are aging, not getting younger.
User avatar #59 to #5 - vanbarbecue (03/01/2014) [-]
Also voices may change less over the years than physical appearance. My great grandfather was the same with his Alzheimers. He would be fine talking to my mom on the phone but he never recognized her in person because in his mind he associated her image with her as a teenager
#2 - netzenk (02/28/2014) [-]
#16 - funkmasterjunk (03/01/2014) [-]
I wish i had a girlfriend to forget about!
I wish i had a girlfriend to forget about!
User avatar #40 to #16 - shellphone (03/01/2014) [-]
THIRSTY
User avatar #48 to #16 - blueberrybluejay (03/01/2014) [-]
You really don't
User avatar #60 to #16 - letting (03/01/2014) [-]
Yeah, ya know, I wish I could forget the fact that I don't have one...
User avatar #43 to #16 - febreezboi (03/01/2014) [-]
Trying to forget about girls is the most heart wrenching feeling, to sugar coat it. It's like having your heart ripped out slowly without painkillers or being put to sleep, and then having each cell of your skin ripped off slowly, and then having your raw body burnt in sulfuric acid while you're screaming bloody murder and writhing in pain.
tl;dr;tv Its not that fun.
#44 to #43 - funkmasterjunk (03/01/2014) [-]
Aaaaaaaaaaaaannndd..... This got too serious for FJ.
User avatar #76 to #43 - fuzzysixx ONLINE (03/01/2014) [-]
As weird as it may sound, i have a new strategy and it works pretty well for me. I don't try to get over her. I just let my feeling do what they will and accept what they are. They will eventually go away. Of course my story isn't so bad currently.
User avatar #46 to #43 - mrgoodlove (03/01/2014) [-]
Basically...
User avatar #33 to #16 - mutzaki ONLINE (03/01/2014) [-]
How do you know you don't?
#34 to #33 - funkmasterjunk (03/01/2014) [-]
Ahhaaaa!!...


Wait....
#20 - krayon (03/01/2014) [-]
My grandpa has Alzheimer's and my dad had to break the news to him.

Dad: "Pops, you have Alzheimer's but it's ok the family is here to help you through it"

Grandpa: "That sounds like a bad break, but hey it could be worse, at least I don't have Alzheimer's"
User avatar #39 - dracomancer (03/01/2014) [-]
My grandma was the one who put my love of cooking into me. She had immigrated to America from South Africa She wanted to open up a bakery. Unfortunately she was diagnosed with Alzheimer's before she could realize her dreams. What made me happy though was that she never forgot my name. When she started to forget how she made her own cookies I would go into the kitchen and help her. I just recently found a notebook full of all her recipes and she had a note for me. It read "Listen my little iqhawe, I must apologize for not being able to help you with you're wonderful cooking, but I started writing down all my recipes because the day will come when I forget how to make them. Don't worry little one. You'll see me again one day. I expect you to have a lot to teach me about cooking and for you to look a lot older than me." along with some other personal stuff.
User avatar #68 to #39 - mrgoodlove (03/01/2014) [-]
That was beautiful. Thanks for sharing.
User avatar #9 - nyxeos (03/01/2014) [-]
That is both incredibly sweet and depressing at the same time. My grandpa has Parkinson's, and it's getting really hard to see him go through it. The one thing that gives me some comfort is that at least he still has his mind, so he knows we're all there for him.
User avatar #90 to #9 - lionelrichie **User deleted account** (03/01/2014) [-]
My Dad has Parkinson's, he's only 54. I'm really hoping for a permanent treatment soon.
User avatar #93 to #90 - nyxeos (03/01/2014) [-]
Sorry to hear that. That's pretty early onset. With the right medication they can already really delay it. My grandpa's had it for about 10 years now give or take, and like I said below it's only just becoming really problematic. But a cure would definitely be better, or at least something that can fully stop progression.
User avatar #94 to #93 - lionelrichie **User deleted account** (03/01/2014) [-]
For my Dad its not surviving thats the issue it the quality of life, I know it'll get to a point where he will try to commit suicide and theres nothing i can do or say to change that. I hope for yours and my sake that new medication is on the way.
User avatar #95 to #94 - nyxeos (03/01/2014) [-]
I doubt my pop will make it that long, but I'm definitely still holding out for people like your dad who have some time.
User avatar #18 to #9 - callmepolyt (03/01/2014) [-]
Same here man, but i think he's starting to lose it, it's depressing as **** .
User avatar #19 to #18 - nyxeos (03/01/2014) [-]
Same here as in your grandpa also has Parkinson's?

And it is depressing. It's honestly one of my greatest fears, because I've only ever lost pets before. And while he's had it for years, and I've known about it for years, I've been able to push it out of my mind as just old age problems. Last year he called me for my birthday and started off by apologizing for his voice sounding funny because he's losing his ability to speak, and it was terrifying. I haven't seen him in a while since he lives far away, but I'll be there for my brother's wedding this summer, and I'm worried I'll just collapse crying when I see him because of how downhill he's gone since I last saw him.

And if you meant losing it as in mentally, I know that feeling too. His hip replacement doctors didn't check his Parkinson's medication/how it would interact with the pills for the surgery recovery, so we spent two days thinking he had suddenly developed dementia because he started bursting into tears that my grandmother had left him when of course she didn't. Never felt so much relief as when we found out they just had to change his meds.
User avatar #21 to #19 - callmepolyt (03/01/2014) [-]
Yeah, my grandpa has Parkinson's Disease also.

It's worse because he lives with me, I notice him forgetting things he has said, and him losing his ability to walk and talk. I like to sit and play games of chess with him to try and keep his mind strong, but I can see he's making slower decisions and such.

Parkinson's is a sad way to die.
User avatar #23 to #21 - nyxeos (03/01/2014) [-]
We've just had to move my pop into a nursing home. He can't turn himself over in bed anymore, and he's too big for my nan to keep moving him/pulling him up. I love him more than anything, and that's why as much as it would hurt, I'm hoping he'll die of something else before it really gets a chance to take hold. It's accelerated a lot recently, and I have a bad feeling within the next year or two he won't be able to move or talk much at all. It's a ******* horrible way to die.
#25 to #23 - callmepolyt (03/01/2014) [-]
Here he is, he doesnt like close up pictures or any pictures due to his condition.
#27 to #25 - nyxeos (03/01/2014) [-]
Here's my pop, back in September. Fortunately he's the kind of guy who will always smile and joke around. Another reason why I'm thankful his mental state is still in tact. It's one thing to be losing him, it'd be another to be losing someone who isn't even him anymore.
User avatar #29 to #27 - callmepolyt (03/01/2014) [-]
That's exactly how I feel! You're like a Caucasian me, i'm assuming you're white based on that picture of your Grandfather.
User avatar #30 to #29 - nyxeos (03/01/2014) [-]
lol, yes. I am. It's definitely a disease that leaves a big impact on anyone nearby.
User avatar #31 to #30 - callmepolyt (03/01/2014) [-]
Yeah, man its crazy I remember when I was kid heading to the beach every weekend with him and running and him taking me to the park down the street to play basketball. It's sad, but I knew he was gonna die, but I wasnt hoping it was gonna be this soon. How old's your pop?
User avatar #32 to #31 - nyxeos (03/01/2014) [-]
I know what you mean. He used to live nearby, and spent a number of years living with us, all before he got sick. And like I said, with him being so far away even when he did get sick it was delayed for me, since I didn't see him right away, so that image stayed.

And I'm not entirely sure actually, but I believe somewhere between about 75-78. He has lived a long life, which is another reason I'm hoping for something else to take him first. It'd be horrible to lose him, but it'll be worse if he holds on long enough that we actually lose him to Parkinson's. What about yours?
User avatar #35 to #32 - callmepolyt (03/01/2014) [-]
He's around the same age or older, I dont know. Just had a conversation with him, and he tells me he thinks he can overcome Parkinson's and he thinks he progressively getting worse.
User avatar #36 to #35 - nyxeos (03/01/2014) [-]
It is a degenerative disease, so it's not a matter of whether it gets worse but a matter of how quickly.

Anyways, while this conversation has been incredibly depressing and somewhat cathartic, I should get some sleep. If you want to talk more about it, or about anything in general, feel free to PM me. Have a good night.
User avatar #37 to #36 - callmepolyt (03/01/2014) [-]
Good night, man.
#51 - XxLawlietsBitchxX (03/01/2014) [-]
I always remember this photo when I read something like this.

User avatar #77 to #51 - iridium ONLINE (03/01/2014) [-]
Problem with that is nowadays, things break easier and people buy things without thinking them through.

both literally and figuratively.
#72 - jeej (03/01/2014) [-]
User avatar #1 - fizzor (02/28/2014) [-]
[daaaawwwing intensifies]
#11 - ihateemo (03/01/2014) [-]
The way alzheimers works is you forget your most recent memories and slowly fade back in time. This is why people remember their spouse and parents while they forget who their children are.

Everything about Alzheimers makes me sad
User avatar #57 - stealingbikes (03/01/2014) [-]
Geriatric feels
#17 - maldel (03/01/2014) [-]
Comment Picture
User avatar #8 - kyoutu (03/01/2014) [-]
I've watched family die from/with alzheimers.
Unfortunately this is not the way they go...
User avatar #64 to #62 - maestroxevous (03/01/2014) [-]
No.
User avatar #65 to #64 - deadmuerto (03/01/2014) [-]
Viagra. so YES.
#41 - bigmaeck (03/01/2014) [-]
Comment Picture
#91 - esmebuffay (03/01/2014) [-]
My grandpa's just starting to lose touch with things, just a couple months ago he was only getting confused and a little forgetful but now he's getting up in the middle of the night to make breakfast and asking why he isn't going to work, he's been retired for fifteen years or more. The night after I found out I had a dream about him, it was just he and I and I was asking him questions, just sitting quietly asking him questions about his life when he was young and various things I never cared to ask. I hope I can have that moment with him while he can still answer the questions. I'm pretty much your average teenaged grandson, I never made an effort to spend time with him or get to know him, I guess I just figured we'd have more time, I didn't know there was Alzheimer's on his side of the family. I think the worst part about Alzheimer's is that you have to lose them twice. (change she to he)
My grandpa's just starting to lose touch with things, just a couple months ago he was only getting confused and a little forgetful but now he's getting up in the middle of the night to make breakfast and asking why he isn't going to work, he's been retired for fifteen years or more. The night after I found out I had a dream about him, it was just he and I and I was asking him questions, just sitting quietly asking him questions about his life when he was young and various things I never cared to ask. I hope I can have that moment with him while he can still answer the questions. I'm pretty much your average teenaged grandson, I never made an effort to spend time with him or get to know him, I guess I just figured we'd have more time, I didn't know there was Alzheimer's on his side of the family. I think the worst part about Alzheimer's is that you have to lose them twice. (change she to he)
User avatar #92 to #91 - mrgoodlove (03/01/2014) [-]
If you feel a certain way about someone, tell them. People never get the flowers while they can still smell them.
#89 - yuukoku (03/01/2014) [-]
My grandfather had Alzheimer's before he passed away.

It started out just a little strange, but it got gradually worse. My grandmother refused to take him to a home to receive the care he needed, which the Air Force would pay for anyway because of his prior service and rank. He added to the family's stress tremendously and only really got the care he needed after he went nuts one night and attacked my grandmother. I still think about how I should have spoken up back then.

The worst part was his funeral. It was difficult to feel much of anything. I feel like he never simply died; He slowly eroded away from the brilliant, caring man he was to just an unstable, miserable mess. In a way, we were all happy that he moved on and I'm sure he's in a better place, but it just felt wrong. The whole ordeal still haunts me.
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